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Southeastern wildlife

The species profiles below are a one-stop-shop for information about the the Service's Southeast region is responsible for protecting and/or recovering.

  • A biologist holding a yellow/brown fish on a river bank in front of a dam
    North Carolina Biologist with Sicklefin redhorse. Photo: Mark Cantrell, USFWS.

    Sicklefin redhorse

    The sicklefin redhorse, a freshwater fish, can grow to 25 inches long. It has a sickle-shaped back fin that is olive-colored, sometimes partly red. Its body is also olive, with a coppery or brassy sheen; its lower fins are primarily dusky to dark, often tinted yellow or orange and pale edged; the tail fin is mostly red.  Visit the species profile...

  • A crayfish with brown and white splotches and narrow claws with deep red tips
    Information icon Slenderclaw crayfish (Cambarus cracens). Photo © Guenter Schuster.

    Slenderclaw crayfish

    The slenderclaw crayfish is a relatively small crayfish, ranging from 1 to 1 ½ inches in size. The colors range from olive green to rusty brown.  Visit the species profile...

  • A plant sample from the Smithsonian collection. Leaves towards the root are broad, while leaves towards the end of the stalks are narrow like rosemarry.
    Information icon Small-anthered bittercress sample from the Smithsonian. Photo by the Smithsonian Institution, CC BY-NC-SA 3.0.

    Small-anthered bittercress

    Small-anthered bittercress is an erect, slender perennial herb with fibrous roots and one (or, rarely, more) simple or branched stem growing two to four decimeters tall.  Visit the species profile...

  • A leafy green plant emerging from the leaf-littered forest floor.
    Information icon Small-whorled pogonia on the forest floor. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Small-whorled pogonia

    The small-whorled pogonia is a rare orchid listed as threatened on the endangered species list.  Visit the species profile...

  • Two cone shaped flowers with pink petals in the foreground with several similar specimens blurred in the background
    Information icon Smooth coneflower at a power-line right of way in Granville County, NC. Photo by Caroline S. Krom, USFWS.

    Smooth Coneflower

    Smooth coneflower is a perennial herb and is a composite, a cluster of flowers grouped together to form a single flower-like structure that will live for more than two years.  Visit the species profile...

  • A black, grey and yellow snake with a rounded head.
    Information icon Southern hognose snake. Photo by Pierson Hill, FWC.

    Southern hognose snake

    Taxon: Reptile Range: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina Status: At-risk species, petitioned for listing on July 11, 2012; 90-day-finding that petitioned action may be warranted First described by Carl Linneaus in 1766 from a specimen received from Charleston, South Carolina, the southern hognose snake is the smallest of the five species of hognose snakes native to North America. All belonging to the genus Heterodon, there is the eastern hognose snake (H.  Visit the species profile...

  • A biologist repels down a cliff face to find an endangered plant.
    Information icon The National Park Service’s Matt Cooke measures a spreading avens plant. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Spreading avens

    Spreading avens, sometimes called Appalachian avens or cliff avens, is a rare perennial herb endemic to a few scattered mountaintops in western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee.  Visit the species profile...

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