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Southeastern wildlife

The species profiles below are a one-stop-shop for information about the the Service's Southeast region is responsible for protecting and/or recovering.

  • Two cone shaped flowers with pink petals in the foreground with several similar specimens blurred in the background
    Information icon Smooth coneflower at a power-line right of way in Granville County, NC. Photo by Caroline S. Krom, USFWS.

    Smooth Coneflower

    Smooth coneflower is a perennial herb and is a composite, a cluster of flowers grouped together to form a single flower-like structure that will live for more than two years.  Visit the species profile...

  • A black, grey and yellow snake with a rounded head.
    Information icon Southern hognose snake. Photo by Pierson Hill, FWC.

    Southern hognose snake

    Taxon: Reptile Range: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina Status: At-risk species, petitioned for listing on July 11, 2012; 90-day-finding that petitioned action may be warranted First described by Carl Linneaus in 1766 from a specimen received from Charleston, South Carolina, the southern hognose snake is the smallest of the five species of hognose snakes native to North America. All belonging to the genus Heterodon, there is the eastern hognose snake (H.  Visit the species profile...

  • A biologist repels down a cliff face to find an endangered plant.
    Information icon The National Park Service’s Matt Cooke measures a spreading avens plant. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Spreading avens

    Spreading avens, sometimes called Appalachian avens or cliff avens, is a rare perennial herb endemic to a few scattered mountaintops in western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small, brown and yellow fish with iridescent scales around its gills
    Information icon A female spring pygmy sunfish. Photo by Matt Laschet.

    Spring pygmy sunfish

    Taxon: Fish Range: Currently occurs in two spring systems in Limestone and Madison County, Alabama. Status: Listed as threatened on October 2nd, 2013 The spring pygmy sunfish is a spring associated fish that is endemic to springs in northern Alabama. It was historically known to occur in springs in North Alabama along the Tennessee River in Limestone and Lauderdale counties. The spring pygmy sunfish was first discovered in Cave Spring in Lauderdale County, Alabama in 1937.  Visit the species profile...

  • Tiny brown spider with a white egg sac on a moist forest surface
    Information icon U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Susan Cameron visited Mount Craig in July, 2019 to search for the spider. Her effort was met with success as she logged the first known occurrence of the spider on the mountain. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Spruce-fir moss spider

    The spruce-fir moss spider is one of the smallest members of the primitive suborder of spiders, Mygalomorphae, which includes tarantulas and trapdoor spiders.  Visit the species profile...

  • Two dark gray mussels with striations on a red towel next to a ruler for scale.
    Information icon Suwannee moccasinshells. Photo by USFWS.

    Suwannee moccasinshell

    The Suwannee moccasinshell is a small freshwater mussel that rarely exceeds 2 inches in length found only in the Suwannee River Basin in Florida and Georgia.  Visit the species profile...

  • Bright pink conical flowers.
    Information icon Flowering swamp pink. Photo by Maja Dumat, CC BY 2.0.

    Swamp pink

    Swamp pink and it’s beautiful conical flower is only found in wetlands along streams and seepage areas in freshwater swamps.  Visit the species profile...

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