skip to content

Southeastern wildlife

The species profiles below are a one-stop-shop for information about the the Service's Southeast region is responsible for protecting and/or recovering.

  • A small fish with bright blue fins and orange coloring on its back.
    Information icon Trispot darter. Photo by Pat O'Neil, Geological Survey of Alabama.

    Trispot darter

    The trispot darter has three prominent black dorsal saddles, pale undersurface, and a dark bar below the eye. Scattered dark blotches exist on the fins rays.  Visit the species profile...

  • Five white swans with black feet and a black beak in flight in winter
    Information icon Tundra swans on the wing at Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

    Tundra swan

    Taxon: Anseriformes, Anatidae Range: Tundra swans breed primarily in Alaska and northern Canada and winter on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the United States. The eastern population migrates southeast to coastal areas from Delaware to North Carolina, while the western population migrates south to the Pacific Northwest and several inland areas. Status: Not listed, low concern – Continental population sizes exceed 200,000, and populations appear to have been increasing since the early 1980s.  Visit the species profile...

  • A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.
    Information icon Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

    Venus flytrap

    The Venus flytrap, a small perennial herb, is one of the most widely recognized carnivorous plant species on Earth. It occupies distinct longleaf pine habitats in the Coastal Plain and Sandhills of North and South Carolina.  Visit the species profile...

  • White flowers with many stamen burst from a shrub much like a hydrangea bush
    Information icon Virginia spiraea, Walker County, Georgia. Photo © Alan Cressler, used with permission.

    Virginia spiraea

    The Virginia spiraea is found in the Appalachian Plateaus or the southern Blue Ridge Mountains in Alabama, Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina, Kentucky, and Georgia.  Visit the species profile...

  • Waccamaw silverside

    The Waccamaw silverside, also known as skipjack or glass minnow, is a small (growing to about 2.5 inches), slim, almost transparent fish with a silver lateral stripe along each side. Its body is laterally compressed, the eyes are large, and the jaw is sharply angled upward.  Visit the species profile...

  • A Florida manatee calf sticks close to its mother in shallow water
    Information icon A Florida manatee calf sticks close to its mother in shallow water. Photo: Keith Ramos, USFWS

    West Indian manatee

    Manatees are large, elongated marine mammals with paired flippers and a large round or spoon-shaped tail. They can reach lengths of over 14 feet and weights of over 3,000 pounds  Visit the species profile...

  • A plant that looks similar to grass with tiny white flowers extending from the ends.
    Information icon White irisette flowers. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    White irisette

    White irisette is a perennial herb that lives in areas with partial sun and flowers from late May through July.  Visit the species profile...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn