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Southeastern wildlife

The species profiles below are a one-stop-shop for information about the the Service's Southeast region is responsible for protecting and/or recovering.

  • A grey and black duck with a rusty orange colored head
    Information icon A redhead duck. Photo by Clayton Ferrell, USFWS.

    Redhead

    Redheads are large diving ducks that feed by diving below the water’s surface looking for plant tubers and other foods. This species often occurs in large flocks, called rafts, especially during winter. This duck is known for its rounded, bright red head, two tone bill, and gray back. Conservation status Low concern. Although this species is hunted, harvest is tightly restricted as there are concerns over the potential effects of harvest on population sustainability.  Visit the species profile...

  • A photograph of the outside and inside of a ring pink shell next to a ruler for scale.  Shell is approximately 3 inches wide.
    Information icon Ring pink. Photo by Leroy Koch, USFWS.

    Ring pink

    The orangefoot pimpleback is a mussel found in Alabama, Illinois, Kentucky and Tennessee rivers.  Visit the species profile...

  • A close up photo of a yellow mussel shell
    Information icon Adult rough pigtoe in the Green River in Kentucky. Photo by Monte McGregor, Center Mollusk Conservation, Kentucky DFWR.

    Rough pigtoe

    The rough pigtoe is a medium sized mussel, dark to yellowish brown in color, that is native to the Ohio River system. It is found in Alabama, Indiana, Kentucky and Virginia, with experimental populations in Tennessee, and is protected as an endangered species.  Visit the species profile...

  • A grey, brown and yellow butterfly with circular patterns near the ends of it’s wings that somewhat resemble eyes
    Information icon Saint Fancis’ satyr. Photo by Melissa McGaw, NCWRC.

    Saint Francis’ satyr

    Soon after its discovery in the 1980s, scientists believed that this small, dark brown butterfly had been collected to extinction, but it was rediscovered in 1992.  Visit the species profile...

  • A leafy green plant with purple and red coloring around the edges of leaves and stems growing in the sand.
    Information icon Seabeach amaranth in North Carolina. Photo by Dale Suiter USFWS

    Seabeach amaranth

    Seabeach amaranth is a low-growing annual that occurs on sandy beaches from South Carolina to Massachusetts. Threats to this species include sea level rise, habitat modification and recreational use of beaches.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small yellow flower with red markings extends from a fern-like plant.
    Information icon Sensitive joint-vetch. Photo by dogtooth77, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.

    Sensitive joint-vetch

    Taxon: Plant Range: Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Virginia Status: Listed as threatened on May 20, 1992 Sensitive joint-vetch gets its name from its leaves, which fold slightly when touched. According to the Five Year Review completed in 2013, only 32 occurrences remain in New Jersey, Maryland, North Carolina, and Virginia, and the species is no longer found in Pennsylvania and Delaware. Sensitive joint-vetch is easily confused with the invasive weed Aeschynomene indica, and sometimes referred to erroneously as an agricultural pest.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small fish with swimming above rocky substrate. Fish is striped tail to snout brown, black and white.
    Information icon Sickle darter; Photo by Crystal Ruble, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Sickle darter

    The sickle darter is a small fish native to the upper Tennessee River drainage in North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.  Visit the species profile...

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