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Southeastern wildlife

The species profiles below are a one-stop-shop for information about the the Service's Southeast region is responsible for protecting and/or recovering.

  • A grey, brown and yellow butterfly with circular patterns near the ends of it’s wings that somewhat resemble eyes
    Information icon Saint Fancis’ satyr. Photo by Melissa McGaw, NCWRC.

    Saint Francis’ satyr

    Soon after its discovery in the 1980s, scientists believed that this small, dark brown butterfly had been collected to extinction, but it was rediscovered in 1992.  Visit the species profile...

  • A leafy green plant with purple and red coloring around the edges of leaves and stems growing in the sand.
    Information icon Seabeach amaranth in North Carolina. Photo by Dale Suiter USFWS

    Seabeach amaranth

    Seabeach amaranth is a low-growing annual that occurs on sandy beaches from South Carolina to Massachusetts. Threats to this species include sea level rise, habitat modification and recreational use of beaches.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small yellow flower with red markings extends from a fern-like plant.
    Information icon Sensitive joint-vetch. Photo by dogtooth77, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.

    Sensitive joint-vetch

    Taxon: Plant Range: Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Virginia Status: Listed as threatened on May 20, 1992 Sensitive joint-vetch gets its name from its leaves, which fold slightly when touched. According to the Five Year Review completed in 2013, only 32 occurrences remain in New Jersey, Maryland, North Carolina, and Virginia, and the species is no longer found in Pennsylvania and Delaware. Sensitive joint-vetch is easily confused with the invasive weed Aeschynomene indica, and sometimes referred to erroneously as an agricultural pest.  Visit the species profile...

  • A biologist holding a yellow/brown fish on a river bank in front of a dam
    North Carolina Biologist with Sicklefin redhorse. Photo: Mark Cantrell, USFWS.

    Sicklefin redhorse

    The sicklefin redhorse, a freshwater fish, can grow to 25 inches long. It has a sickle-shaped back fin that is olive-colored, sometimes partly red. Its body is also olive, with a coppery or brassy sheen; its lower fins are primarily dusky to dark, often tinted yellow or orange and pale edged; the tail fin is mostly red.  Visit the species profile...

  • A crayfish with brown and white splotches and narrow claws with deep red tips
    Information icon Slenderclaw crayfish (Cambarus cracens). Photo © Guenter Schuster.

    Slenderclaw crayfish

    The slenderclaw crayfish is a relatively small crayfish, ranging from 1 to 1 ½ inches in size. The colors range from olive green to rusty brown.  Visit the species profile...

  • A plant sample from the Smithsonian collection. Leaves towards the root are broad, while leaves towards the end of the stalks are narrow like rosemarry.
    Information icon Small-anthered bittercress sample from the Smithsonian. Photo by the Smithsonian Institution, CC BY-NC-SA 3.0.

    Small-anthered bittercress

    Small-anthered bittercress is an erect, slender perennial herb with fibrous roots and one (or, rarely, more) simple or branched stem growing two to four decimeters tall.  Visit the species profile...

  • A leafy green plant emerging from the leaf-littered forest floor.
    Information icon Small-whorled pogonia on the forest floor. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Small-whorled pogonia

    The small-whorled pogonia is a rare orchid listed as threatened on the endangered species list.  Visit the species profile...

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