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Southeastern insects

The species profiles below are a one-stop-shop for information about the insects the Service's Southeast region is responsible for protecting and/or recovering.

  • Shot from above: a small bee that resembles a yellow jacket perched on a yellow flower with a sand beach below.
    Information icon Gulf Coast solitary bee. Photo by Center for Biological Diversity.

    Gulf Coast solitary bee

    The Gulf Coast solitary bee is a rare inhabitant of the sandy barrier islands and landward dunes along the Gulf of Mexico extending from Horn Island, Mississippi eastward to St. Andrew’s Bay in northwest Florida.  Visit the species profile...

  • An iridescent insect with many small hairs on its belly standing on leaf litter and sandy soil
    Miami tiger beetle. Photo by Jonathan Mays, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

    Miami tiger beetle

    The Miami tiger beetle, found exclusively in pine rockland habitat in Miami-Dade County, Florida, has a shiny green exterior and protected under the Endangered Species Act as endangered.  Visit the species profile...

  • An orange, black and cream colored butterfly perched on a yellow flowering plant
    Information icon Puerto Rican harlequin butterfly. Photo by Jan Zegarra, USFWS.

    Puerto Rican harlequin butterfly

    One of four species of Atlantea butterflies that inhabit the Greater Antilles, only the Puerto Rican harlequin butterfly occurs in Puerto Rico. With a small population size, no more than 50 butterflies have ever been recorded in a single survey.  Visit the species profile...

  • A grey, brown and yellow butterfly with circular patterns near the ends of it’s wings that somewhat resemble eyes
    Information icon Saint Fancis’ satyr. Photo by Melissa McGaw, NCWRC.

    Saint Francis’ satyr

    Soon after its discovery in the 1980s, scientists believed that this small, dark brown butterfly had been collected to extinction, but it was rediscovered in 1992.  Visit the species profile...

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