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Southeastern birds

The species profiles below are a one-stop-shop for information about the birds the Service's Southeast region is responsible for protecting and/or recovering.

  • A small, black and white bird flies over ocean waters.

    Black-capped petrel

    Taxon: Bird Range: North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and the Caribbean Status: Proposed for listing as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act The black-capped petrel is a seabird found in North America and the Caribbean, and is known by several common names: “black-capped petrel,” “capped petrel,” and “West Indian petrel” in North America and on English-speaking islands. In the Greater and Lesser Antilles, the bird is known as “diablotín” (little devil). Visit the species profile...

    Black-capped petrel off the coast of Cape Hatteras, NC. Photo © Brian Patteson, seabirding.com, used with permission.

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.

    Eastern black rail

    Black rails are the smallest rails in North America. One of four recognized subspecies of black rail, the eastern black rail is perhaps the most secretive. This small inhabitant of shallow salt and freshwater marshes is rarely seen and has a distinctive "kick-ee-doo" call that is often heard at night. Visit the species profile...

    Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

  • A white breasted bird with blueish grey feathers.

    Elfin-woods warbler

    The elfin-woods warbler was discovered in 1968. In 2016, the elfin-woods warbler was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act with a Section 4(d) rule providing exemptions for certain agriculture and forestry activities that may benefit the species. Visit the species profile...

    Elfin-woods warbler. Photo by Mike Morel.

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