skip to content
A sleepy looing alligator resting on fallen leaves.
Information icon An American alligator at Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery. Photo © Trent Mitchell.

Wildlife

  • A colorful green/brown and red trout covered in small red spots.
    Information icon A wildlife biologist holds a small eastern brook trout. Photo by Steve Droter, Chesapeake Bay Program.

    Brook trout

    The brook trout is a fish native to the eastern United States, and is often referred to as speckled trout, spotted trout, brookie, and squaretail. “Brookies” are considered an indicator species, because they help indicate the health or overall quality of the waters they inhabit.  Visit the species profile...

  • Brown trout

    Taxon: Freshwater fish Range: Native to Europe; introduced to North America in 1883. Status: Not listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) Brown trout are a coldwater species like most fish of the salmon family. The first brown trout eggs were imported to the U.S. from Germany in 1883. In 1884, the release of 4,900 brown-trout fry into Michigan’s Baldwin River represented the first time the species swam free in U.  Visit the species profile...

  • A prehistoric looking fish with spines down its back and sides.
    Information icon Lake sturgeon. Photo by USFWS.

    Lake sturgeon

    Taxon: Freshwater Fish Range: Freshwater systems of North America from the Hudson Bay through the Mississippi River drainages Status: Not listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Lake sturgeon is listed as threatened at the state level in 19 of the 20 states it inhabits. Lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) is a temperate fish occurring in freshwater systems of North America from the Hudson Bay through the Mississippi River drainages.  Visit the species profile...

  • A colorful trout in hand with a smiling angler in the background.
    Beautiful rainbow trout. Photo by Cale Bruckner, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Rainbow trout

    Rainbow trout are a North American game fish that get their name from the beautiful colors that shine on their skin. Coloration of the fish varies widely in relationship to sex, habitat, and maturity.  Visit the species profile...

  • A biologist holding a yellow/brown fish on a river bank in front of a dam
    North Carolina Biologist with Sicklefin redhorse. Photo: Mark Cantrell, USFWS.

    Sicklefin redhorse

    The sicklefin redhorse, a freshwater fish, can grow to 25 inches long. It has a sickle-shaped back fin that is olive-colored, sometimes partly red. Its body is also olive, with a coppery or brassy sheen; its lower fins are primarily dusky to dark, often tinted yellow or orange and pale edged; the tail fin is mostly red.  Visit the species profile...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn