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Tag: Wounded Warriors

The content below has been tagged with the term “Wounded Warriors.”

Articles

  • West Tennessee refuges host first Wounded Warrior deer hunt

    December 13, 2018 | 1 minute read

    Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge in Brownsville, Tennessee, hosted 10 warriors for the refuge’s first annual Wounded Warrior hunt on Saturday, November 17. On hand to greet them were Tennessee State Senator Dolores Gresham, Brownsville Mayor Bill Rawls, and Haywood County Mayor David Livingston. Community sponsors, Insouth Bank of Brownsville and Brownsville Exchange Club, provided a dinner on Friday night and lunch on Saturday. Refuge employees put up 10 blinds and tree stands and assisted the hunters.  Learn more...

  • Two dozen veterans stand in front of the visitors center at the hatchery showing off the larged striped bass they caught.
    Information icon Veterans show off their striped bass. Photo by Moria Painter, USFWS.

    Annual Wounded Warriors Fishing Event at Wolf Creek

    October 11, 2018 | 1 minute read

    Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery and the Friends of Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery hosted the seventh annual Wounded Warriors Fishing Event on September 11, 2018, for 20 American servicemen and servicewomen. The event began at 5:30 a.m. Participants received t-shirts, breakfast, and snacks before departing to Lake Cumberland for a morning of striped bass fishing. During the afternoon, the veterans enjoyed a catered barbeque lunch, a21-gun-salute provided by the local Disabled American Veterans, and a goody bag from the Friends of Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery.  Learn more...

  • Veterans carry their hog through a swamp.
    Information icon Two wounded warriors and a volunteer, accompanied by a cameraman, carry a feral pig through the swamp at Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by SOWW.

    Hog heaven

    March 28, 2018 | 3 minute read

    Feral pigs are widely considered a nuisance species. The wild hogs cause an estimated $1.5 billion in property damage every year all over the United States on both public and private lands, according to the Mississippi State University Center for Resolving Human-Wildlife Conflicts. They are an invasive species that can disrupt entire food chains. “They’re really bad for the ecosystem,” said Craig Sasser, refuge manager at Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge in South Carolina.  Learn more...

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