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Tag: Wildlife Trafficking

The content below has been tagged with the term “Wildlife Trafficking.”

Articles

  • Four released birds spread their wings and take flight towards the blue sky.
    Information icon Migratory birds take to the skies after being uncaged at Everglades National Park. The birds had been seized as part of Operation Ornery Birds. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Taking flight to freedom

    April 17, 2018 | 6 minute read

    About 130 birds were released April 14 into Florida’s River of Grass by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials and partners at Everglades National Park headquarters near Homestead, Florida. The birds had been bought by undercover agents from illegal trappers and traffickers, and seized in a series of arrests in the days leading up to the release.  Learn more...

News

  • Owner of Arecibo aquarium business pleads guilty to two federal Lacey Act felonies for illicit trafficking of protected corals

    August 23, 2017 | 4 minute read

    Aristides Sanchez, a resident of Arecibo, Puerto Rico, pleaded guilty today to two felony violations of the federal Lacey Act for collecting, purchasing, falsely labeling, and shipping protected marine invertebrate species as part of an effort to subvert Puerto Rican law designed to protect corals and other reef species, the Department of Justice announced. Sanchez was the owner of the Arecibo-based saltwater aquarium business, Wonders of the Reef Aquarium. A large part of the business was devoted to the sale of native Puerto Rican marine species that are popular in the saltwater aquarium trade.  Read the full story...

  • Four rhino horns on a desk next to a podium with the US Fish and Wildlife logo.
    Rhino horns can sell for up to 35k per pound. These are about 3-5 pounds. Photo by USFWS.

    Owners of safari company indicted for illegal rhino hunts

    October 23, 2014 | 6 minute read

    The owners of Out of Africa Adventurous Safaris were charged with conspiracy to sell illegal rhinoceros hunts in South Africa in order to defraud American hunters, money laundering and secretly trafficking in rhino horns, announced Sam Hirsch Acting Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department’s Environment and Natural Resources Division; George L. Beck, Jr., U.S. Attorney for the Middle District of Alabama; and Dan Ashe, Director of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.  Read the full story...

  • Brightly colored aquarium coral and decorations.
    Combo rock containing product illegally collected or sold from the Florida Keys. Photo by USFWS.

    Idaho aquarium sentenced for illegal trafficking of marine life

    April 15, 2014 | 4 minute read

    Wifredo A. Ferrer, United States Attorney for the Southern District of Florida, Tracy Dunn, Acting Special Agent in Charge, NOAA Fisheries Office of Law Enforcement, and Edward Grace, Deputy Assistant Director, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Office of Law Enforcement, announce that Idaho Aquarium, Inc. (IAI), located in Boise, Idaho, was sentenced today in Key West for conspiring to harvest, transport, and sell spotted eagle rays and lemon sharks, knowing the marine life were taken, possessed, transported, sold, and intended to be sold in violation of the laws and regulations of the State of Florida, contrary to the federal Lacey Act, Title 16, United States Code, Sections 3372(a)(2)(A), and 3373(d)(1) and (2), all in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 371.  Read the full story...

  • A small alligator standing on sandy soil.
    Baby alligator relaxing on a beach. Photo by Molly Martin, USFWS.

    Michigan aquarium employee sentenced for illegal trafficking of marine life

    April 15, 2014 | 3 minute read

    Wifredo A. Ferrer, United States Attorney for the Southern District of Florida, Tracy Dunn, Acting Special Agent in Charge, NOAA Fisheries Office of Law Enforcement, and Edward Grace, Deputy Assistant Director, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Office of Law Enforcement, announce that Joseph Franko, 35, of Romulus, Michigan, was sentenced today in Key West for conspiring to purchase, transport, harvest and sell sea fans, ornamental tropical fish and alligators, knowing the wildlife was taken, possessed, transported, sold, and intended to be sold in violation of the laws and regulations of the State of Florida, in violation of Title 16, United States Code, Sections 3372(a)(2)(A), 3372(a)(4), and 3373(d)(1) and (2), all in violation of Title 18,United States Code, Section 371.  Read the full story...

  • A red and black patterned reptile with protruding scales.
    Gila monster. Photo by OZinOH CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Scottsboro man sentenced for trafficking protected reptiles

    October 12, 2012 | 2 minute read

    BIRMINGHAM, AL - A Scottsboro man was sentenced Tuesday for the illegal possession, transportation and sale of protected reptiles in violation of the Lacey Act, announced U.S. Attorney Joyce White Vance and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Special Agent in Charge for the Southeast Region Luis J. Santiago. Chief U.S. District Judge Sharon Lovelace Blackburn sentenced David Langella, 43, to three years’ probation for conspiring to violate the Lacey Act and violating the Lacey Act.  Read the full story...

  • The head of a large boa constrictor being handled by a biologist.
    Boa constrictor. Photo by FWC.

    Snake smuggler busted in Orlando

    August 24, 2012 | 2 minute read

    On August 23, 2012, Mateus Dal Maso, Jr. pled guilty to attempting to export 27 snakes from the Orlando International Airport, Florida. He was sentenced to one year of supervised release when within the geographical confines of the United States (must report to probation within 72 hours of arrival), two days incarceration with two days served, a $25 fee, and a fine of $6,000. Dal Maso had purchased the 27 snakes – one Ball Python, seven Boa Constrictors, and 19 various color morph corn snakes – at the National Reptile Breeders Expo in Daytona Beach, Florida, held Aug 17-19, 2012.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • A huge bin of crushed ivory pieces.
    Crushing our ivory sends a message to ivory traffickers and their customers that the United States will not tolerate this illegal trade. Photo by Kate Miyamoto, USFWS.

    Turn in poachers

    February 22, 2016 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Poaching isn’t just about the illegal harvest of elephant tusks and rhino horns – it can be a serious issue here in the southern Appalachians, impacting game animals, hurting the chances of recovering endangered species, and affecting our ability to continue harvesting traditional forest products like ginseng. The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission has a new program to help cut animal poaching by rewarding members of the public who report suspicious activity or provide knowledge related to wildlife poaching that results in a conviction.  Learn more...

  • A tiny turtle with orange patches on the side of its throat crawls through the grass
    A young bog turtle in an Appalachian bog. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Tracking bog turtles

    June 1, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. I’ve often talked about southern Appalachian Mountain bogs, their rarity, and the rareness of many of the plants and animals found in them. There’s a bog south of Asheville that’s a bittersweet place. Despite development in its vicinity, it still hangs on, and in fact people in the community recognize its importance. What makes it a sad place is it used to be home to one of the best bog turtle populations in the southeast.  Learn more...

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Southern Appalachian poaching

    January 30, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. It seems this winter has seen a flurry of activity in the capture and prosecution of wildlife smugglers. In mid-December a German man was arrested for smuggling hundreds of live tarantulas, including protected species, into the United States through the U.S. mail. In late December two smugglers plead guilty to breaking federal law in connection to their attempt to smuggle Cuban pigeon eggs into the country, running the risk of bringing avian disease into the United States.  Learn more...

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