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Tag: Wildlife Observation

The content below has been tagged with the term “Wildlife Observation.”

Articles

  • A marsh at low tide exposes a mud flat with sparse pine trees in the distance.
    Information icon Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Nanciann Regalado, USFWS.

    Coastal Alabama refuge adds land

    April 26, 2019 | 3 minute read

    A jewel of an ecosystem just grew by more than 350 football fields, thanks to a partnership between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and several partners. The land in question: the Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge, a roughly 7,000-acre tract near Gulf Shores, Alabama. It’s called the Little Point Clear Unit — two parcels comprising 470 acres, enough land to accommodate 355 football games. It became a formal part of the refuge April 26.  Learn more...

  • Eight volunteers, half women, half men, pose in front of the welcome sign at Bayou Teche NWR
    Information icon AmeriCorps NCCC crew at Bayou Teche National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

    Bayou Teche boardwalk trail open for adventure thanks to volunteers

    January 30, 2019 | 2 minute read

    As the cypress and tupelo trees along the bayou began to turn their fall yellow and russet colors, an AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC) team arrived in Southeast Louisiana. This traveling crew of eight young adults, aged 18 to 25, were excited to gain leadership and job skills while making a difference at Bayou Teche refuge. Their stewardship mission for three weeks was to repair an interpretive boardwalk that winds through a wetland area.  Learn more...

  • 2018 Family Adventure Day in Louisiana

    May 31, 2018 | 2 minute read

    On March 10, 2018, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office and the Baton Rouge Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office participated in the Healing House’s Family Adventure Day fundraiser and community outreach event in Lafayette, Louisiana  Learn more...

  • Dozens gather for a ribbon cutting ceremony.
    Information icon Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge staff members Jereme Phillips and Brittany Petersen mark the reopening of the Jeff Friend Trail with help from the Blue Goose, the mascot of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Photo by Nanciann Regalado, USFWS.

    Bon Secour trail reopening underscores priority of access to public lands

    March 15, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge in Gulf Shores is not only one of the largest undeveloped parcels of land on the Alabama coast, it’s also one of the few places where you can go from the primary dunes along the Gulf of Mexico to a maritime forest and uplands. “It’s like a snapshot of what the Gulf coast was like hundreds and thousands of years ago,” says Jereme Phillips, the refuge manager.  Learn more...

Charleston

  • A kayaker navigates her boat through a flooded forest.
    Information icon Kayaking through Sparkleberry Swamp. Photo by USFWS.

    Outdoor recreation

    Our nation has one of the world’s largest networks of protected public lands set aside for the enjoyment of the American people. This vast network supports a healthy outdoor recreation industry, providing millions of jobs across the U.S. and generating billions of dollars for the economy. These jobs and revenue in turn help support local communities and fund conservation efforts. So whether you are hunting, fishing, or hiking, you’re not just renewing your spirit and improving your health, you’re also contributing to the future of conserving and enhancing our natural heritage for future generations.  Learn more...

News

  • An alligator swims through shallow water with only its eyes above water.
    Information icon American alligator at Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Lisa Jacobs, CC BY-ND 2.0.

    Closure of Lee Road boat ramps to bank fishing due to visitors feeding alligators

    September 26, 2018 | 2 minute read

    A number of nuisance and aggressive alligators have recently been observed at the Lee Road Boat Ramp on the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. Most alligators are, by nature, nervous of human activity and will usually avoid close contact with people. However, if alligators are fed by people, some will lose their natural fear and will begin to approach when they see people. These alligators can be very dangerous and are termed “nuisance gators”.  Read the full story...

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