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Tag: Whooping Crane

The content below has been tagged with the term “Whooping Crane.”

News

  • Airborne ultralight with whooping cranes following.
    Information icon Class of 2013 by Operation Migration. Photo by Heather Ray, Operation Migration.

    Endangered whooping cranes now in Alabama on aircraft-guided flight to Florida

    December 12, 2013 | 5 minute read

    Eight young whooping cranes that began their aircraft-led migration on October 2, 2013 from the White River Marsh State Wildlife Area in Green Lake County, Wisconsin, today made it to Winston County, Alabama.  Read the full story...
  • Two large, white, Whooping cranes flying in for a landing on a small pond.
    Two juvenile Whooping cranes released from their holding pen fly around on Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge, Decatur, AL. Photo by Bill Gates, USFWS.

    Ultralight-led whooping cranes released at Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge

    February 10, 2012 | 3 minute read

    The nine whooping cranes led by ultralight aircraft have been released from a holding pen at Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge after Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership biologists attached marking bands and transmitters to help track their movements. “So far the cranes are foraging and hanging around close to the pen and moving into the flooded fields,” said Bill Gates, Biologist at Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge, near Decatur and Huntsville, Ala. “We plan to leave the gate to the pen open, so if they need to come back here they can.  Read the full story...
  • A plush adult whooping crane with food attached to its plastic tongue feeds a small, beige chick.
    A whooping crane chick fed by a biologist in a rearing costume that mimics an adult crane.

    Wild whooping crane chicks hatch at Necedah National Wildlife Refuge in central Wisconsin

    May 13, 2011 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Necedah National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) and the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership (WCEP) are celebrating another success in efforts to reintroduce a wild migratory whooping crane population in eastern North America. Three whooping crane chicks hatched this week at Necedah NWR in central Wisconsin. The first chick to hatch this season was the offspring of wild whooping crane W1-06. W1-06 was hatched and raised in 2006 on Necedah NWR and is the first wild offspring from the eastern whooping crane reintroduction project started more than a decade ago.  Read the full story...
  • Four young whooping cranes look for food on a muddy bank.
    Juvenile Whooping Cranes Forage on Wheeler NWR. Photo by Bill Gates, USFWS.

    Second whooping crane found dead at Weiss Lake, Alabama

    February 18, 2011 | 4 minute read

    Federal investigators have discovered the remains of a second whooping crane at Weiss Lake on the Alabama-Georgia border. The second crane, identified as #22-10, a crane released last year in Wisconsin in the company of other older cranes, was found less than a quarter-mile from whooping crane #12-04. Investigators believe #12-04 was shot sometime before January 28, and consider the deaths linked. Laboratory results are still pending. A hefty reward now stands at $23,250, a combined total contributed by 18 non-governmental organizations, federal agencies, and private individuals for additional information on the deaths of the two whooping cranes leading to successful prosecution of the perpetrator(s).  Read the full story...
  • Four young whooping cranes with bands on their legs rest in a net enclosure.
    Juvenile Whooping Cranes in their holding pen at Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge, Decatur, AL. Photo by USFWS.

    Ultralight migration leads 20 endangered whooping cranes over the skies of Alabama

    December 17, 2010 | 4 minute read

    Twenty juvenile whooping cranes reached Franklin County, Alabama, on December 17, 2009, on their ultralight-guided migration from Necedah National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in central Wisconsin to Chassahowitzka and St. Marks National Wildlife Refuges along Floridas Gulf Coast. These majestic birds, the tallest in North America, left Necedah refuge on October 23, following Operation Migration’s four ultralight aircraft. Alabama is one of the seven states the ultralight-guided migration will fly over before reaching Florida.  Read the full story...
  • Four young whooping cranes look for food on a muddy bank.
    Juvenile Whooping Cranes Forage on Wheeler NWR. Photo by Bill Gates, USFWS.

    Ultralight migration leads 20 endangered whooping cranes into Georgia

    January 7, 2010 | 6 minute read

    Twenty juvenile whooping cranes and several chilly pilots in ultralights reached Decatur County, Georgia, today on their ultralight-guided migration from Necedah National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in central Wisconsin to Chassahowitzka and St. Marks National Wildlife Refuges along Floridas Gulf Coast. “Successfully restoring a population of a migratory species is a huge challenge and this pioneering effort is demonstrating the need for long-term commitment,” said Mike Harris, Nongame Conservation Section chief with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources.  Read the full story...
  • A bright white lighthouse emerges over calm water and a mix of palm and oak trees.
    Lighthouse at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Steve Hillebrand, USFWS.

    Ultralight-led whooping cranes arrive at final wintering destination in Florida

    January 2, 2010 | 5 minute read

    Ten endangered whooping cranes arrived yesterday on their wintering grounds at the Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Citrus County, Florida. The other 10 “Class of 2009” ultralight-led cranes reached their final wintering destination at St. Marks NWR in Wakulla County, Florida on January 13. These 20 cranes are the ninth group to be guided by ultralight aircraft more than 1,200 miles from Necedah NWR in central Wisconsin to the Gulf coast of Florida.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • Two bright white birds with red patches on their face and long slender legs standing in the a dormant grassy field.
    Information icon Whooping cranes. Photo by D. Serverson, USFWS.

    Whooping cranes in Western North Carolina

    January 25, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Whooping cranes are one of the rarest animals in the world, with only between 525 and 550 remaining. Of those, two recently touched down in Western North Carolina. Biologists recently confirmed the presence of a pair of whooping cranes in Clay County, North Carolina, marking the first time the birds have been documented wintering in Western North Carolina. The two birds in Western North Carolina are part of an experimental eastern flock of birds which biologists are trying to establish that would migrate between the upper Midwest and the southeast.  Learn more...
  • Two bright white birds with red patches on their face and long slender legs standing in the a dormant grassy field.
    Information icon Whooping cranes. Photo by D. Serverson, USFWS.

    Whooping crane deaths

    January 17, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature I recently spoke about a flock of critically endangered whooping cranes flying across a corner of the Southern Appalachians on their way from Wisconsin to Florida. Things were going well for the small group of birds, except for one who was hampered by a leg injury, but still had a long and healthy life ahead of him as a breeding, education, or research bird.  Learn more...
  • Two bright white birds with red patches on their face and long slender legs standing in the a dormant grassy field.
    Information icon Whooping cranes. Photo by D. Serverson, USFWS.

    Whooping cranes headed south

    January 3, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Ten of the world’s most endangered birds recently flew across the Southern Appalachians, led by a trio of ultra-light aircraft. The birds were the 10th group of whooping cranes to be escorted from Wisconsin in an ongoing effort to establish a new flock of migrating whooping cranes. For years all of the migrating wild cranes were part of a flock that flew between Wisconsin and Texas, however several years ago a project came together to establish an eastern flock of the cranes, flying between Wisconsin and Florida.  Learn more...

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