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Tag: Whooping Crane

The content below has been tagged with the term “Whooping Crane.”

Articles

  • Two large white birds flying low over a wetland coming in for a landing with a Service biologist in the foreground

    “Journey of the Whooping Crane” follows efforts to save a rare, endangered bird

    November 30, 2018 | 2 minute readIn 1940, only about 20 whooping cranes were known to exist. Today, thanks to the diligence of many partners working together in the United States and Canada, there are more than 850 cranes in North America and the population continues to increase slowly and steadily. The iconic bird is one of the success stories of the Endangered Species Act (ESA). But it remains one of the rarest animals in the world. Learn more...

    Two endangered whooping cranes coming in for a landing. Photo by Greg Pope.

  • A biologist showing off a Louisiana pinsnake.

    Family adventure day in Louisiana

    May 3, 2017 | 1 minute readOn March 11, 2017, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Louisiana Ecological Services Office and the Baton Rouge Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office participated in the Healing House’s Family Adventure Day fundraiser and community outreach event in Lafayette, Louisiana. The Healing House provides support for children grieving the loss of a loved one. The Service’s station was one of 43 activity locations that families could visit throughout Lafayette. More than 250 participants selected the Service’s activity as one of their adventures. Learn more...

    Thomas Athens (Center), David Castellanos, and Sharna Tolfree introduce Luigi, the Louisiana pinesnake, to Family Adventure Day participants. Photo by Angela Trahan, USFWS.

  • Biologists wearing white gowns head-to-toe walking through nets in a marsh holding whooping cranes.

    Whooping crane reintroduction continues in Louisiana

    May 3, 2017 | 2 minute readThe whooping crane reintroduction effort is well underway in southwestern Louisiana. Since 2011, 10-16 hatched juveniles have been released annually here into the non-essential experimental population (NEP). The original release pens are located at White Lake Wetlands Conservation Area, and in 2016 a new release area was added 19 miles to the south at Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge. The expanded release areas allow the NEP to receive more juvenile cranes for release into the wild. Learn more...

    Biologists tend to whooping cranes in one of the release pens at White Lake Wetlands Conservation Area. Photo by Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

News

  • Biologists wearing white gowns head-to-toe walking through nets in a marsh holding whooping cranes.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service considers changes to protect endangered whooping cranes

    March 7, 2018 | 2 minute readThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is working with many partners led by state wildlife agencies, conservation groups and zoos, to secure the whooping crane’s recovery. They were first classified as endangered in 1967. Once numbering as few as only 14 cranes, they now number about 700 that live both in the wild in the United States and Canada, and in captive facilities where they can safely breed. Read the full story...

    Biologists tend to whooping cranes in one of the release pens at White Lake Wetlands Conservation Area. Photo by Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

  • Two whooping cranes follow a large fan powered glider in front of a gray sky.

    Ultralight-led whooping cranes complete fall migration to St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge in Florida

    December 11, 2014 | 3 minute readST MARKS, FL - Early this morning, seven young whooping cranes following two ultralight aircraft during a two-month migration landed at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge where they will spend the winter. They traveled 63 days and 1,100 miles from Necedah National Wildlife Refuge in Wisconsin to St. Marks. “After today’s destination flight lasting 50 minutes, our seven-month-old whooping cranes touched down for the first time on their new winter home,” said Heather Ray of Operation Migration. Read the full story...

    Two whooping cranes fly over St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge following the second ultralight aircraft. Photo by Terri Calleson, USFWS.

  • Long white birds flying in formation behind a fan powered glider.

    Seven whooping cranes fly into Georgia following ultralight aircraft

    December 9, 2014 | 4 minute readSeven whooping cranes following pilots in two ultralight aircraft lifted off from Pike County, Alabama today and flew 117 miles before landing in Decatur County, Georgia. It sounds very simple, but in reality is amazingly difficult. Why? Well it seems cranes just have minds of their own. And if it’s cold, or the wind isn’t right, they don’t just automatically follow these brave pilots dressed up like whooping cranes flying ultralight aircraft. Read the full story...

    We hope for a tremendous viewing audience for this amazing spectacle! Photo by Nick Baldwin, a refuge volunteer.

  • Seven young white whooping cranes with beige heads and feathers rest in a protective net pen.

    Whooping cranes arrive in Tennessee

    November 14, 2014 | 3 minute readSeven young whooping cranes are making their way south in their first migration from Wisconsin, being led by costumed pilots in ultralight aircraft. But the weather isn’t cooperating, and after making only 52 miles in 34 days, the migration team decided to use ground transportation to move the cranes into Tennessee and more favorable migration conditions. The seven young whooping cranes started their southward journey on October 10, 2014, from the White River Marsh State Wildlife Area in Green Lake County, near Princeton, Wisconsin. Read the full story...

    Whooping cranes in Tennessee. Credit: Operation Migration.

  • Long white birds flying in formation behind a fan powered glider.

    Endangered whooping cranes arrive at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, FL on aircraft-guided flight

    January 7, 2014 | 3 minute readEight young whooping cranes that began their aircraft-led migration from the White River Marsh State Wildlife Area in Wisconsin, made it to their destination at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge in Florida. Read the full story...

    We hope for a tremendous viewing audience for this amazing spectacle! Photo by Nick Baldwin, a refuge volunteer from last years flyover.

  • Long white birds flying in formation behind a fan powered glider.

    Endangered whooping cranes make it to Florida following ultralights

    December 31, 2013 | 4 minute readEight young whooping cranes that began their aircraft-led migration on October 2, 2013, from the White River Marsh State Wildlife Area in Green Lake County, Wisconsin, today made it to Leon County, Florida. Read the full story...

    We hope for a tremendous viewing audience for this amazing spectacle! Photo by Nick Baldwin, a refuge volunteer from last years flyover.

  • Airborne ultralight with whooping cranes following.

    Endangered whooping cranes now in Georgia on aircraft-guided flight to Florida

    December 30, 2013 | 3 minute readEight young whooping cranes that began their aircraft-led migration on October 2, 2013, from the White River Marsh State Wildlife Area in Green Lake County, Wisconsin, today made it to Decatur County, Georgia. Read the full story...

    Class of 2013 by Operation Migration. Photo by Heather Ray, Operation Migration.

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