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Tag: White-Nose Syndrome

The content below has been tagged with the term “White-Nose Syndrome.”

Articles

  • A bat with a fuzzy head and large round eyes clings to the handler’s gloved hand
    Information icon Robin is an Egyptian fruit bat. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

    They come out at night

    August 10, 2017 | 4 minute read

    The 2017 blitz, like those that preceded it, attempted to spread a little bat understanding – and, perhaps, some bat love. Bat experts invited the public to spend a few moments regarding a creature that’s suffered from a PR problem. Most folks just don’t understand bats, or what they do.  Learn more...

  • A brown bat attached to the roof of a cave with white fuzz around its nose
    Information icon In this 2016 photo, a tri-colored bat with evidence of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) hibernates on the wall of the Black Diamond Tunnel in the North Georgia mountains. Photo by Pete Pattavina, USFWS.

    Disease continues its fatal sweep of bats

    March 14, 2017 | 5 minute read

    The oars splashed, that slight sound magnified as it echoed off rock walls that led to a distant, black point. With each pull, the tunnel’s illuminated opening got smaller – the darkness, greater. Pete Pattavina paused in mid-paddle. He saw a cluster of creatures. They hung from the wall as the boat floated past. Each was a bat, folded in winter slumber. One day soon, they’d leave their hibernaculum in the mountains of North Georgia.  Learn more...

News

  • A brown bat attached to the roof of a cave with white fuzz around its nose
    Information icon In this 2016 photo, a tri-colored bat with evidence of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) hibernates on the wall of the Black Diamond Tunnel in the North Georgia mountains. Photo by Pete Pattavina, USFWS.

    NFWF announces more than $1.1 million in grants to help bats

    October 30, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Birmingham, Alabama — On the eve of Halloween, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) announced more than $1.1 million in grants to combat white-nose syndrome (WNS) and promote the survival of bats in North America. The grants were announced at the Ruffner Mountain Nature Center in Birmingham, Alabama, where Bat Conservation International (BCI), one of the grantees, is working with two non-toxic anti-fungal agents, ultraviolet light and polyethylene glycol, as a way to reduce the impact of WNS.  Read the full story...

  • A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.
    Information icon Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

    Bat, snail, and popular plant may need endangered species protection

    December 19, 2017 | 5 minute read

    More research is needed on three species before U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials can determine whether to add them to the threatened and endangered species list. More scientific and commercial information will be compiled for the Venus flytrap, located in the Carolinas; oblong rocksnail, located in Alabama; and tricolored bat, located in 38 states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. The Service and its partners will continue to research the species’ life history, biological requirements and habitats to develop a Species Status Assessment (SSA) and 12-month finding.  Read the full story...

  • A small brown bat on the roof of a cave with a fuzzy white fungus on its nose.
    A tri-color bat in the Avery County with white-nose syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    Fish and Wildlife Service directs money to Southeast to fight bat disease

    July 17, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Southeastern states from North Carolina to Mississippi will receive nearly $300,000 to study and fight a fatal disease sweeping bat colonies, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) announced Monday. The Service is disbursing $289,236 to 10 southeastern states to research and battle white-nose syndrome (WNS), an affliction that has decimated bats across about two-thirds of the United States. The allocation represents nearly a third of just over $1 million distributed across 37 states where the disease has turned up, the Service said.  Read the full story...

  • A small brown bat on the roof of a cave with a fuzzy white fungus on its nose.
    A tri-color bat in the Avery County with white-nose syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    Service awards grants to 35 states, District of Columbia for work on deadly bat disease

    July 1, 2015 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced grant awards totaling just under $1 million to 35 states and the District of Columbia for white-nose syndrome (WNS) projects. State natural resource agencies will use the funds to support research, monitor bat populations and prepare for and respond to WNS, a disease that afflicts bats. “White-nose syndrome has now been confirmed in 26 states and five Canadian provinces,” said Dr. Jeremy Coleman, the Service’s national WNS coordinator.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • A small brown bat on the roof of a cave with a fuzzy white fungus on its nose.
    Information icon A tri-color bat in the Avery County with white-nose syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    Bat monitoring protocol

    November 9, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature Monitoring, or regularly going out and counting plants or animals following an established protocol, provides biologists with key information on the distribution of plants and animals and the well-being of individual populations. Though well-developed, nation-wide monitoring programs are in place for birds and other animals, until now there hasn’t been a similar program for North American bats. Earlier this year, the Forest Service published guidelines for participating in NABat, the first step in establishing a monitoring program for North American bats, and in doing so, provide natural resource managers the information they need to manage bat populations effectively, detect early warning signs of population declines, and estimate extinction risks.  Learn more...

  • A small brown bat on the roof of a cave with a fuzzy white fungus on its nose.
    Information icon A tri-color bat in the Avery County with white-nose syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park closure for bats

    September 28, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature Great Smoky Mountains National Park officials announced the closure of the Whiteoak Sink area effective now through March 31, 2016 to limit human disturbance to bat hibernation sites and help hikers avoid interactions with bats. Park biologists have reported dramatic declines of cave-dwelling bat populations throughout the park, thought to be due to white-nose syndrome. Infected bats are marked by a white fungal growth on their noses, wings, and tail membrane.  Learn more...

  • A shiny green insect burrowed into a tree.
    Emerald ashe borer. Photo by USDA.

    Emerald ash borer control

    September 21, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. On a recent camping trip to Great Smoky Mountains National Park, it bore remembering that the park only allows outside firewood that is certified as being heated to the point that undesirable insects hitching a ride on the wood would be killed. One of the undesirable insects that is already in the park is the emerald ash borer. This Asian insect was first detected in the United States in Michigan in 2002 and has killed tens of millions of ash trees across the U.  Learn more...

  • Three furry bats hang from the wet ceiling of a cave.
    Trio of tri-colored bats. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Forest Service caves closed

    July 21, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. As the fatal bat disease white nose syndrome continues to spread, leaving millions of dead bats in its wake, land managers continue working to check its spread. In an effort to prevent the human spread of the disease by clothes or equipment, most federal and state caves have been closed to the public, and the Regional Forester for the Southern Region of the U.  Learn more...

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