skip to content

Tag: White-Nose Syndrome

The content below has been tagged with the term “White-Nose Syndrome.”

Articles

  • A man in a hard hat builidng a wooden barrier inside a cave.
    Information icon Jim Honaker, a contractor, fashions a cave barrier. Photo by Kristen Bobo.

    Ozark Big-Eared Bats Receive a Little Love and a Lot of Protection

    August 11, 2021 | 2 minute read

    On a cool, rainy day in late April, a small group gathered in a remote parking lot near Lee Creek Reservoir in Van Buren, Arkansas. They were waiting for a semi-trailer truck to arrive with nearly seven tons of steel destined for a series of bat caves on private lands in northwest Arkansas. The team consisted of staff from the city of Fort Smith, Arkansas; the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission; the U.  Learn more...

  • Female biologist standing in cave, in protective white suit with headlamp, holding a small gray bat.
    Information icon Biologist attached a radio telemetry transmitter to a gray bat, Credit G. Peeples, USFWS.

    Casual sighting leads to endangered bat discovery

    May 26, 2021 | 7 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina - On May 9, 2016, biologist Chris Kelly saw a lone bat on a bridge crossing the French Broad River outside Asheville, North Carolina. Five years later, everything wildlife biologists thought they knew about endangered gray bats in this corner of the Blue Ridge Mountains has been upended. Kelly, a biologist with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, was on the bridge doing bird work. Bats aren’t her area of expertise, so she reached out to the state’s bat experts.  Learn more...

  • Biologists standing at the entrance of a cave shot from inside the cave
    Information icon Biologists at the mica mine entrance L to R Kristi Confortin, NCWRC, Sam McCoy NCWRC, Katherine Etchison, NCWRC, Sue Cameron, USFWS. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    White-nose syndrome diminishes North Carolina bat populations

    April 29, 2020 | 5 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — A short way into an abandoned mica mine in western North Carolina’s Haywood County, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Susan Cameron pointed to the chamber’s high ceiling, explaining that it’s where the majority of the mine’s hibernating bats used to find shelter. State and federal biologists search for bats-top to bottom Katherine Etchison, NCWRC, Kristi Confortin, NCWRC, Sue Cameron USFWS. The mine sits on protected land, not far from the Blue Ridge Parkway.  Learn more...

  • A small, fuzzy, brown bat baring teeth in the hands of a biologist
    Information icon Northern long-eared bat captured in Bladen County, NC. Photo by Gary Jordan, USFWS.

    Aiding the northern long-eared bat

    November 19, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Bats provide valuable ecosystem services that impact the world’s economy and our lives. They pollinate cash crops and forests, disperse seeds, produce fertilizer and control pests by devouring insects. Many bat species are in decline, however, due to habitat loss and disease, especially white-nose syndrome (WNS). The Service has been working with partners promoting conservation, research and innovation to fight back at the national level. In the eastern half of the U.  Learn more...

  • A brown, furry bat attached to the roof of a humid cave
    Information icon A tri-colored bat Fern Cave National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Michael Senn, USFWS.

    To the bat cave!

    July 25, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Paint Rock, Alabama — Nothing really distinguishes Nat Mountain from its hilly neighbors amid the southern foothills of the Appalachian Mountains. It’s not particularly tall at 1,600 feet. It offers no sweeping summertime views, except snatches of distant mountains and the curvaceous Paint Rock River. It’s home to the Fern Cave National Wildlife Refuge, but, on the surface, there’s really nothing to do here. It’s what’s below ground that tantalizes.  Learn more...

  • A bat with a fuzzy head and large round eyes clings to the handler’s gloved hand
    Information icon Robin is an Egyptian fruit bat. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

    They come out at night

    August 10, 2017 | 4 minute read

    The 2017 blitz, like those that preceded it, attempted to spread a little bat understanding – and, perhaps, some bat love. Bat experts invited the public to spend a few moments regarding a creature that’s suffered from a PR problem. Most folks just don’t understand bats, or what they do.  Learn more...

  • A brown bat attached to the roof of a cave with white fuzz around its nose
    Information icon In this 2016 photo, a tri-colored bat with evidence of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) hibernates on the wall of the Black Diamond Tunnel in the North Georgia mountains. Photo by Pete Pattavina, USFWS.

    Disease continues its fatal sweep of bats

    March 14, 2017 | 5 minute read

    The oars splashed, that slight sound magnified as it echoed off rock walls that led to a distant, black point. With each pull, the tunnel’s illuminated opening got smaller – the darkness, greater. Pete Pattavina paused in mid-paddle. He saw a cluster of creatures. They hung from the wall as the boat floated past. Each was a bat, folded in winter slumber. One day soon, they’d leave their hibernaculum in the mountains of North Georgia.  Learn more...

News

  • A brown bat attached to the roof of a cave with white fuzz around its nose
    Information icon In this 2016 photo, a tri-colored bat with evidence of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) hibernates on the wall of the Black Diamond Tunnel in the North Georgia mountains. Photo by Pete Pattavina, USFWS.

    NFWF announces more than $1.1 million in grants to help bats

    October 30, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Birmingham, Alabama — On the eve of Halloween, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) announced more than $1.1 million in grants to combat white-nose syndrome (WNS) and promote the survival of bats in North America. The grants were announced at the Ruffner Mountain Nature Center in Birmingham, Alabama, where Bat Conservation International (BCI), one of the grantees, is working with two non-toxic anti-fungal agents, ultraviolet light and polyethylene glycol, as a way to reduce the impact of WNS.  Read the full story...

  • A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.
    Information icon Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

    Bat, snail, and popular plant may need endangered species protection

    December 19, 2017 | 5 minute read

    More research is needed on three species before U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials can determine whether to add them to the threatened and endangered species list. More scientific and commercial information will be compiled for the Venus flytrap, located in the Carolinas; oblong rocksnail, located in Alabama; and tricolored bat, located in 38 states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. The Service and its partners will continue to research the species’ life history, biological requirements and habitats to develop a Species Status Assessment (SSA) and 12-month finding.  Read the full story...

  • A small brown bat on the roof of a cave with a fuzzy white fungus on its nose.
    A tri-color bat in the Avery County with white-nose syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    Fish and Wildlife Service directs money to Southeast to fight bat disease

    July 17, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Southeastern states from North Carolina to Mississippi will receive nearly $300,000 to study and fight a fatal disease sweeping bat colonies, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) announced Monday. The Service is disbursing $289,236 to 10 southeastern states to research and battle white-nose syndrome (WNS), an affliction that has decimated bats across about two-thirds of the United States. The allocation represents nearly a third of just over $1 million distributed across 37 states where the disease has turned up, the Service said.  Read the full story...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn