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Tag: Wetland

The content below has been tagged with the term “Wetland.”

Articles

Podcasts

  • A biologist takes notes in a notebook under an overcast sky.
    Sue Cameron takes notes near Jackson Park. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Saving, and improving, a Hendersonville wetland

    September 22, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. With all the attention given to development impacts in the mountains, this morning we’re going to look at how a development in Hendersonville, North Carolina will actually improve the situation for wildlife and bird watchers. There aren’t a lot of wetlands in the mountains. Our topography generally dictates that water quickly flows downhill to flatter lands, instead of pooling up and creating wetlands.  Learn more...

Waterfowl

  • Two ducks with bright red heads swimming
    Information icon Redhead ducks at Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Clayton Ferrell, USFWS.

    Waterfowl in the Southeast Region

    Every year as winter descends and temperatures drop, waterfowl migrate from northern breeding grounds to the southeastern United States. This journey can be hazardous and physically demanding. Just like humans taking a long road trip, ducks, geese, swans, and other waterbirds need places to rest and refuel on their journey and throughout the winter months. During the winter, almost 9 million ducks and geese can be found in the southeast.  Learn more...

  • A series of pink, conical gorwing vertically from green foliage
    Information icon Pennsylvania smartweed is a plant that is beneficial to waterfowl and can be found in moist-soil wetlands. Photo by Heath Hagy.

    Primary habitat resources for waterfowl on Refuges in the Southeast

    Moist-soil wetlands Managed moist-soil wetlands consist of natural vegetation dominated by plants that produce an abundance of seeds, such as grasses and sedges. These plants also provide essential nutrients for waterfowl that may not be found in other wetland types. Examples of desirable plants include wild millets, panic grasses, smartweeds, and flatsedges. Also, flooded moist-soil wetlands are home to an array of aquatic macroinvertebrates, an animal without a backbone that lives in water and can be seen without a microscope.  Learn more...

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