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Tag: West Virginia

The content below has been tagged with the term “West Virginia.”

Faq

  • A small black bird flies over a lush green marsh
    Information icon Eastern black rail in flight – Texas, April 2016. Photo © Jesse Huth, used with permission, Huth Avian Services.

    Proposed listing for the eastern black rail

    October 5, 2018 | 12 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to protect the eastern black rail, a small secretive marsh bird native to the United States, as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Partially migratory, the eastern black rail is known in as many as 36 states, plus multiple territories and countries in the Caribbean and Central and South America. It is one of four subspecies of black rail, which live in salt, brackish, and freshwater marshes.  Learn more...

  • A lobster-shaped crayfish held by a biologist
    Big Sandy crayfish. Photo by Zachary Loughman, West Liberty University.

    Endangered Species Act protects two Appalachian crayfish

    April 6, 2016 | 7 minute read

    Following a review of the best available science, peer review and public comment, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has protected the Guyandotte River crayfish as endangered and the Big Sandy crayfish as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. What are the ranges of the Guyandotte River and Big Sandy crayfish? Occurrence data, historical habitat characteristics, and information from species experts indicate that the Big Sandy crayfish’s historical range likely included streams throughout the upper Big Sandy River basin, which covers 10 counties in Kentucky, Virginia, and West Virginia.  Learn more...

News

  • A small, blue and yellow fish floating above rocky substrate
    Information icon Tippecanoe darter. Photo © Robert Criswell, used with permission.

    Tiny freshwater fish does not warrant federal protection

    December 18, 2018 | 3 minute read

    After a thorough scientific review, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that populations of the Tippecanoe darter, a small freshwater fish, do not warrant federal protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). In some places, surveys suggest increasing populations, likely due to improvements in water quality. One of the smallest darters in the world, the Tippecanoe darter continues to be found across its historical range in larger streams and rivers of the Ohio River watershed in Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and West Virginia.  Read the full story...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Service proposes to list the eastern black rail as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    October 5, 2018 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners are working to protect a small, secretive marsh bird that is in steep decline. Some populations of the eastern black rail along the Atlantic coast have dropped by as much as 90 percent, and with a relatively small total population remaining across the eastern United States, the Service is proposing to list the subspecies as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Read the full story...

  • A huge circular cloud formation covering a huge portion of the visible earth as seen from space.
    Information icon Hurricane Florence is pictured from the International Space Station as a category 1 storm as it was making landfall near Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. Photo by NASA.

    Waters rise as storm crawls

    September 15, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Tropical Storm Florence, no longer a hurricane, continues moving slowly across the Carolinas, dumping historic amounts of rainfall on areas already under water. After making landfall Friday morning on the North Carolina coast, the storm is now headed toward Columbia, South Carolina, said meteorologist Denver Ingram. He briefed officials Saturday with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), who have been monitoring the storm from the Service’s Atlanta regional offices.  Read the full story...

  • A lobster-shaped crayfish held by a biologist
    Big Sandy crayfish. Photo by Zachary Loughman, West Liberty University.

    Endangered Species Act protections finalized for two Appalachian crayfishes in Kentucky, Virginia and West Virginia

    April 6, 2016 | 4 minute read

    Just months after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s April 2015 proposal to protect the Big Sandy crayfish and Guyandotte River crayfish as endangered, the agency sent a crayfish expert into the central Appalachians to look for more. The goal: to determine if the outlook for the two creatures was better than previous data indicated. After combing hundreds of likely sites in the Big Sandy and Guyandotte River watersheds in Virginia, West Virginia, and Kentucky, the survey team from West Liberty University had mixed results.  Read the full story...

  • A lobster-shaped and colored crayfish with tinges of rust and blue.
    Big Sandy crayfish. Photo by Zachary Loughman, West Liberty University.

    Crayfish survey reports available for public review

    December 14, 2015 | 3 minute read

    New survey reports for the Guyandotte River and Big Sandy crayfishes are now available for public review, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today. In light of these survey reports and to allow for additional public involvement, the agency has re-opened the comment period for 30 days until January 14, 2016. The Service used the best available information to propose in April 2015 to protect both species as endangered.  Read the full story...

Wildlife

  • A colorful green/brown and red trout covered in small red spots.
    Information icon A wildlife biologist holds a small eastern brook trout. Photo by Steve Droter, Chesapeake Bay Program.

    Brook trout

    The brook trout is a fish native to the eastern United States, and is often referred to as speckled trout, spotted trout, brookie, and squaretail. “Brookies” are considered an indicator species, because they help indicate the health or overall quality of the waters they inhabit.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Eastern black rail

    Black rails are the smallest rails in North America. One of four recognized subspecies of black rail, the eastern black rail is perhaps the most secretive. This small inhabitant of shallow salt and freshwater marshes is rarely seen and has a distinctive “kick-ee-doo” call that is often heard at night.  Visit the species profile...

  • Three brownish yellow mussels the smallest of which has a small white protrusion which the mussel uses to attach to a rock.
    Information icon Photo by Monte McGregor, Center Mollusk Conservation, Kentucky DFWR.

    Fanshell

    The fanshell is a green and yellow, medium sized mussel found in various rivers in Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia. It is protected as an endangered species.  Visit the species profile...

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