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Tag: Welaka National Fish Hatchery

The content below has been tagged with the term “Welaka National Fish Hatchery.”

Articles

  • A deep black snake coiled up on sandy soil with young longleaf pine seedlings in the background
    Information icon An Eastern indigo snake on sandy soil associated with the longleaf pine ecosystem. Photo © Houston Chandler, the Orianne Society (Used with permission).

    22 Eastern Indigo Snakes just released in annual effort to return America’s longest snake to North Florida

    May 8, 2020 | 8 minute read

    Tallahassee, Florida — In an enthusiastic launch of year four of the 10-year effort to return the essential, native, non-venomous apex predator to the region, 22 eastern indigo snakes have just been released in northern Florida. This collaborative program continues the annual release of snakes, listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act and raised specifically for recovery of the species, to The Nature Conservancy’s Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve (ABRP) in Bristol.  Learn more...

  • A small spotted frog in a petri dish with wet vegetation.
    Information icon Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery has been raising gopher frogs for three years, a departure from its traditional responsibilities of propagating fish. Photo by USFWS.

    A good year at the hatcheries

    February 5, 2020 | 5 minute read

    The results are in from another year of propagating snakes and birds and tortoises. The verdict? Allan Brown, help us out. “Good,” said Brown, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (Service) Assistant Regional Director of Fish and Aquatic Conservation. “Actually, better than that. It was great.” Brown oversees a Service office that increasingly focuses on more than just fish. Hatcheries across the region are raising an array of creatures — indigo snakes, Florida grasshopper sparrows and mussels of various stripes, to name a few — in addition to taking care of traditional duties: propagating fish.  Learn more...

  • A green toad with dark spots in a biologist’s gloved hand
    Information icon Biologists at the Saratoga National Fish Hatchery in Wyoming hopped at the chance to raise the endangered Wyoming toad. Photo by USFWS.

    They’re growing what?

    November 6, 2019 | 9 minute read

    In Virginia and South Carolina hatcheries, biologists keep a close eye on shad and striped bass while taking time to focus on something that will never wear scales: mussels. And down in Florida, hatchery scientists charged with making sure rivers and streams are stocked with catfish and bass are singing the praises of a tiny bird they’re raising outside their labs. The Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery is growing alligator snapping turtles to boost that species’ population.  Learn more...

  • A deep black snake coiled up on sandy soil with young longleaf pine seedlings in the background
    Information icon An Eastern indigo snake on sandy soil associated with the longleaf pine ecosystem. Photo © Houston Chandler, the Orianne Society (Used with permission).

    Snakes in a bag

    May 25, 2018 | 8 minute read

    Andalusia, Alabama — A gaggle of biologists, zookeepers, college students and government officials traipsed through the Deep South longleaf pine forest one recent, gorgeous spring morning carefully clutching white pillowcases. They were looking for holes. More specifically, gopher tortoise burrows into which they could deposit their precious cargo of Eastern indigo snakes, aka “Emperors of the Forest.” Southern Alabama including Conecuh National Forest. Map by Roy Hewitt, USFWS.  Learn more...

News

  • A man in a green shirt kneels down into tall grass to release a long black snake.
    Information icon David Printiss of TNC releases an eastern indigo snake into a gopher tortoise burrow during a 2018 release. Photo by Tim Donovan, FWC.

    Good news for America’s longest snake! 15 eastern indigo snakes just released in year three of the North Florida recovery effort

    June 11, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Tallahassee, Florida — Fifteen eastern indigo snakes, listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, have just been released in northern Florida as part of a continuing collaborative plan to return the important, native, non-venomous apex predator to the region. This effort marks the third year in a row that snakes raised specifically for recovery of the species have been released at The Nature Conservancy’s Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve (ABRP) in Bristol.  Read the full story...

  • A small woodpecker perched on a pine tree.
    Information icon In 2018, there were 38 active clusters of endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers on this property in Alabama, thriving there under a Safe Harbor Agreement. Composite photo by Mark Bailey.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service honors Recovery Champions on Endangered Species Day

    May 16, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Endangered Species Day, May 17, 2019, is a day to celebrate efforts to recover 1,663 species on the list of federal endangered wildlife and plants protected under the Endangered Species Act.  Read the full story...

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