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Tag: Waterfowl

The content below has been tagged with the term “Waterfowl.”

Articles

  • A man wearing an orange Tennessee NWR shirt releases a brownish grey bird, which takes flight.
    Information icon A wood duck heads skyward after banding as Bill Ross watches. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

    Banded together

    September 4, 2018 | 8 minute read

    New Johnsonville, Tennessee — They gathered in a large group, more than 100. They didn’t know it yet, but they were about to help science. That began when Clayton Ferrell into their midst and selected one Aix sponsa ­– a wood duck. He held her with his left hand. His right grasped a set of needle-nose pliers. Something flashed in the sun — a small piece of aluminum, slightly curved, with a number engraved on it.  Learn more...

  • Three men posing for a photo in camouflage after a day of waterfowl hunting.
    Information icon Lane, Mark and John Bowie at Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge in Alabama. Lane is a sixth-grader who has gone hunting with his dad and grandpa since he was 7 years old. Photo by Phil Kloer, USFWS.

    Making memories in a duck blind

    February 12, 2018 | 7 minute read

    Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge, Alabama – “Some of the best memories are made even if you don’t pull the trigger” is a saying that circulates among some hunters. At 4:30 a.m., 12-year-old Lane Bowie is scrunched in the backseat of his grandpa’s truck playing a video game on his phone, one that involves frantic thumb movements and never-ending explosions on the little screen. At about 4:30 a.  Learn more...

News

Podcasts

  • Birds splashing water as they fly off of a lake.
    Information icon Mallards taking flight. Photo by Tom Koerner, USFWS.

    Duck populations

    July 14, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Seeing redhead ducks in the local pond on my drive home from work is a little treat. Overall redheads aren’t rare ducks, but the Southern Appalachians are not a hotbed of duck activity and it’s nice to see some migrant ducks amidst the resident mallards that seem to dominate the local waterfowl scene. Duck populations have increased in overall abundance over last year, and their habitat conditions have improved, according to the U.  Learn more...

  • A dozen large, flying birds with red markings over the eye.
    Sandhill cranes at Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge in Decatur, AL. Photo by Tim Lumley, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    National Wildlife Refuge Week

    November 6, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. National Wildlife Refuge week is October 11-17. In the Southern Appalachians, where public lands are likely National Forests or National Park Service lands, it’s important to remember wildlife refuges, administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, for they are the only system of federal lands devoted to wildlife. Across the nation, there are 550 national wildlife refuges, protecting more than 150 million acres, more land than the entire national park system.  Learn more...

Waterfowl

  • A series of pink, conical gorwing vertically from green foliage
    Information icon Pennsylvania smartweed is a plant that is beneficial to waterfowl and can be found in moist-soil wetlands. Photo by Heath Hagy.

    Primary habitat resources for waterfowl on Refuges in the Southeast

    Moist-soil wetlands Managed moist-soil wetlands consist of natural vegetation dominated by plants that produce an abundance of seeds, such as grasses and sedges. These plants also provide essential nutrients for waterfowl that may not be found in other wetland types. Examples of desirable plants include wild millets, panic grasses, smartweeds, and flatsedges. Also, flooded moist-soil wetlands are home to an array of aquatic macroinvertebrates, an animal without a backbone that lives in water and can be seen without a microscope.  Learn more...

  • A hunter and his brown dog on its hind legs look out of the opening of a duck blind
    Information icon Two sportsmen enjoying a morning waterfowl hunt. Photo by Stacey Hayden, USFWS.

    Public access

    Hunting Waterfowl hunters are required to follow state and federal regulations when hunting on national wildlife refuges, including purchasing and carrying a Federal Duck Stamp. Duck Stamps are one of the most successful conservation tools ever created to protect habitat for migratory birds and help ensure abundant waterfowl populations in the future. Approximately 98% of the revenue generated by Duck Stamps goes directly to help acquire and protect wetlands. These wetlands in turn help purify water, aid in flood control, reduce soil erosion, and provide lots of other recreation opportunities.  Learn more...

  • Two ducks with bright red heads swimming
    Information icon Redhead ducks at Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Clayton Ferrell, USFWS.

    Waterfowl in the Southeast Region

    Every year as winter descends and temperatures drop, waterfowl migrate from northern breeding grounds to the southeastern United States. This journey can be hazardous and physically demanding. Just like humans taking a long road trip, ducks, geese, swans, and other waterbirds need places to rest and refuel on their journey and throughout the winter months. During the winter, almost 9 million ducks and geese can be found in the southeast.  Learn more...

  • Spines from books in an environmental science library
    Information icon Library at South Carolina Ecological Services Field Office. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

    Document library

    Waterfowl library  Learn more...

Wildlife

  • Male and female mallard ducks on a lake
    Information icon Mallards at Morris Wetland Management District in Minnesota. Photo by Alex Galt, USFWS.

    Mallard

    Taxon: Anseriformes, Anatidae Range: Mallards occur year-round throughout North America, but most individuals are migratory and breed in the northern United States and Canada and winter in the Southern United States and Mexico. Most of the breeding population occurs in the Prairie Pothole Region of the north-central United States and central Canada. Status: Not listed, low concern – In 2018, the breeding population size exceeded 10 million in the traditional and eastern survey areas of North America.  Visit the species profile...

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