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Tag: Voluntary Conservation

The content below has been tagged with the term “Voluntary Conservation.”

Articles

A man standing in front of a large pine tree trunk

Safe harbor for woodpeckers

January 29, 2018 | 8 minute readNewton, Georgia – They’d probably spent 20 minutes touring the forest when the agent and potential buyer stopped. The client took it all in – the southwest Georgia sky, a blue that got only deeper as it reached to heaven; and, closer to earth, the longleaf pines, their brilliant green needles prickling that lovely sky. That was enough for Charley Tarver. He turned to the agent. Charley Tarver bought a plantation in southwest Georgia 18 years ago and has turned it into a habitat for the red cockaded woodpecker, or RCW. Learn more...

Tarver, who grew up in Alabama, is a longleaf fan. His property, 200 miles south of Atlanta, is named Longleaf Plantation. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

Two biologists check on the health of a sedated Louisiana black bear

David Soileau: bringing the Louisiana black bear back from the brink

March 10, 2016 | 2 minute readThe Louisiana black bear recovery work of people like biologist/land conservation specialist David Soileau has been so successful that sightings of the species is no longer such an uncommon occurrence. Learn more...

The Service’s David Soileau (right) examines a tranquilized Louisiana Black Bear as part of an effort to study the recovery of the species’ population. Photo by USFWS.

Conservationists from the Natural Resources Conservation Service gather around the hood of a truck to investigate paperwork

Easement program a win-win for landowners and black bears

March 10, 2016 | 2 minute readThe rapid expansion of agriculture in the state of Louisiana was one of the factors pushing the Louisiana black bear to the edge of extinction. USDA’s Kevin Norton plays a key role in ensuring the bear has habitat while farmers benefit from restoring and conserving their land. Learn more...

As the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service’s State Conservationist for Louisiana, Kevin Norton (center) has partnered with many people, to the benefit of the Louisiana black bear.

A biologist taking a health assessment for a tranquilized bear

U.S. Department of Agriculture’s wildlife services plays key role in Louisiana black bear recovery

March 10, 2016 | 2 minute readBack in the old days – in the early 90’s – when the Louisiana black bear was first listed under the Endangered Species Act, the Black Bear Conservation Committee (BBCC) was formed and USDA’s Wildlife Services was a key component. “We suggested to the first chair of the group that in order for recovery to succeed, they had to address the human/bear conflicts that would arise – both immediate and future conflicts – as a result of increasing numbers of bears,” said Dwight LeBlanc, Louisiana Wildlife Services state director. Learn more...

Dwight LeBlanc with bear named “Liberty.” The bear was eating watermelons and corn and overturning beehives near Woodville, Wilkinson County, MS. Photo courtesy of Dwight LeBlanc.

Endangered-Species-Act

A brownish-yellow salamander sanding on a mossy rock with large round eyes.

At-Risk Species Conservation

The Endangered Species Act provides a variety of ways for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and our partners to conserve and recover species while reducing regulatory burden. Learn more...

The Pigeon Mountain salamander is no longer at-risk of needing federal protection. Photo by John P. Clare, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

A small gopher tortoise with tan shell standing on sandy grass covered soil.

Voluntary Conservation Tools

If you or someone you know would like to manage property to conserve wildlife and natural resources we’re here to help! Learn more...

Gopher tortoise. Photo by Randy Browning, USFWS.

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