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Tag: Virginia

The content below has been tagged with the term “Virginia.”

Wildlife

  • Male and female mallard ducks on a lake
    Information icon Mallards at Morris Wetland Management District in Minnesota. Photo by Alex Galt, USFWS.

    Mallard

    Taxon: Anseriformes, Anatidae Range: Mallards occur year-round throughout North America, but most individuals are migratory and breed in the northern United States and Canada and winter in the Southern United States and Mexico. Most of the breeding population occurs in the Prairie Pothole Region of the north-central United States and central Canada. Status: Not listed, low concern – In 2018, the breeding population size exceeded 10 million in the traditional and eastern survey areas of North America.  Visit the species profile...

  • Eight northern pintails including two females and six males on a cold, winter lake
    Information icon Northern pintails at Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Clayton Ferrell, USFWS.

    Northern pintail

    Taxon: Anseriformes, Anatidae Range: Northern pintail typically breed in the Prairie Pothole Region of the north-central United States, central Canada, and Alaska. They spend their winters in the southern United States and Mexico, especially along the Texas and Louisiana coasts of the Gulf of Mexico. Status: Not listed, low concern – More than 2.3 million northern pintail were estimated in the breeding population in 2018. However, substantial declines since the 1950s has resulted in restricted harvest regulations for this species.  Visit the species profile...

  • A brown and black mussel with growth striations sitting on a rock.
    Information icon Close-up of endangered mussel from the Ohio River. Photo by Craig Stihler, USFWS.

    Pink mucket

    The Appalachian elktoe has a thin, kidney-shaped shell, extending to about 4 inches. Juveniles generally have a yellowish-brown periostracum (outer shell surface), while the periostracum of the adults is usually dark brown to greenish-black in color.  Visit the species profile...

  • A leafy green plant with purple and red coloring around the edges of leaves and stems growing in the sand.
    Information icon Seabeach amaranth in North Carolina. Photo by Dale Suiter USFWS

    Seabeach amaranth

    Seabeach amaranth is a low-growing annual that occurs on sandy beaches from South Carolina to Massachusetts. Threats to this species include sea level rise, habitat modification and recreational use of beaches.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small yellow flower with red markings extends from a fern-like plant.
    Information icon Sensitive joint-vetch. Photo by dogtooth77, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.

    Sensitive joint-vetch

    Taxon: Plant Range: Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Virginia Status: Listed as threatened on May 20, 1992 Sensitive joint-vetch gets its name from its leaves, which fold slightly when touched. According to the Five Year Review completed in 2013, only 32 occurrences remain in New Jersey, Maryland, North Carolina, and Virginia, and the species is no longer found in Pennsylvania and Delaware. Sensitive joint-vetch is easily confused with the invasive weed Aeschynomene indica, and sometimes referred to erroneously as an agricultural pest.  Visit the species profile...

  • A plant sample from the Smithsonian collection. Leaves towards the root are broad, while leaves towards the end of the stalks are narrow like rosemarry.
    Information icon Small-anthered bittercress sample from the Smithsonian. Photo by the Smithsonian Institution, CC BY-NC-SA 3.0.

    Small-anthered bittercress

    Small-anthered bittercress is an erect, slender perennial herb with fibrous roots and one (or, rarely, more) simple or branched stem growing two to four decimeters tall.  Visit the species profile...

  • A leafy green plant emerging from the leaf-littered forest floor.
    Information icon Small-whorled pogonia on the forest floor. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Small-whorled pogonia

    The small-whorled pogonia is a rare orchid listed as threatened on the endangered species list.  Visit the species profile...

  • Tiny brown spider with a white egg sac on a moist forest surface
    Information icon U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Susan Cameron visited Mount Craig in July, 2019 to search for the spider. Her effort was met with success as she logged the first known occurrence of the spider on the mountain. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Spruce-fir moss spider

    The spruce-fir moss spider is one of the smallest members of the primitive suborder of spiders, Mygalomorphae, which includes tarantulas and trapdoor spiders.  Visit the species profile...

  • Bright pink conical flowers.
    Information icon Flowering swamp pink. Photo by Maja Dumat, CC BY 2.0.

    Swamp pink

    Swamp pink and it’s beautiful conical flower is only found in wetlands along streams and seepage areas in freshwater swamps.  Visit the species profile...

  • Two tan colored mussels with dark striations eminating from their base on rocky substrate
    Information icon Tan riffleshells, male on the left; female on the right. Public domain photo by Dick Biggins.

    Tan riffleshell

    The tan riffleshell (Epioblasma florentina walkeri) is a medium sized freshwater mussel that has been listed under the threatened and endangered species list since 1977. It is a filter feeding mollusc found within isolated populations primarily in Virginia and Tennessee.  Visit the species profile...

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