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Tag: Virginia

The content below has been tagged with the term “Virginia.”

Podcasts

  • A fuzzy bat bearing its teeth with white fungus covering its face.
    Information icon Little brown bat from Avery County with White Nose Syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    Southern Appalachians face white nose syndrome

    July 10, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. White nose syndrome, an affliction of unknown origin that is fatal to bats, has been confirmed in two Virginia counties, the first cases in the Southern Appalachians. First documented in New York in 2006, WNS has killed tens of thousands of bats as it spread north and south. The affliction takes its name from the white-tufts of fungus that often grow on the muzzles of infected bats, however, it’s unknown if this fungus is the cause of the problem or merely taking advantage of a diseased and weakened bat.  Learn more...

  • A prehistoric looking fish with spines down its back and sides.
    Information icon Lake sturgeon. Photo by USFWS.

    New report looks at the state of American fish

    December 20, 2008 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week, we’ll look at the state of fish populations, both in the Southern Appalachians and across the nation. The slender chub is a tiny fish known only from the Clinch, Powell, and Holston Rivers of eastern Tennessee and southwest Virginia. It hasn’t been seen in the wild since 2002, despite searches by some of the best fish biologists in the region.  Learn more...

Wildlife

  • Seven small brownish-yellow mussels held in open hands by a biologist.
    Information icon Atlantic pigtoes ready for release. Photo by USFWS.

    Atlantic pigtoe

    The Atlantic pigtoe is a small freshwater clam found in Virginia, North Carolina, and historically in South Carolina and Georgia.  Visit the species profile...

  • A tiny turtle with orange patches on the side of its throat crawls through the grass
    A young bog turtle in an Appalachian bog. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Bog turtle (southern population)

    The bog turtle is the smallest turtle in North America. It’s orange to yellow patch on either side of the neck easily distinguishes it from other turtles.  Visit the species profile...

  • A biologist holding a small squirrel with yellow gloves
    Information icon A Carolina northern flying squirrel in the hands of a biologist. Photo by Sue Cameron, USFWS.

    Carolina northern flying squirrel

    The Carolina northern flying squirrel is an American endangered species found in North Carolina, Virginia and Tennessee. It is typically found at high elevations in mixed red spruce-northern hardwood and spruce-fir forests.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small black mussel with brownish yellow striations extends a small white appendage from its shell
    Information icon Cumberland bean juveniles reared at the Center for Mollusk Conservation in Frankfort, Kentucky. Photo by Monte McGregor, Center Mollusk Conservation, Kentucky DFWR.

    Cumberland bean

    The Cumberland bean is a small mussel found in Alabama, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. It is protected as an endangered species and can be found in river systems within the Cumberland River and Tennessee River drainages.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Eastern black rail

    Black rails are the smallest rails in North America. One of four recognized subspecies of black rail, the eastern black rail is perhaps the most secretive. This small inhabitant of shallow salt and freshwater marshes is rarely seen and has a distinctive “kick-ee-doo” call that is often heard at night.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small, slimy, green salamander in hand.
    Eastern hellbender. Photo by Will Parson, Chesapeake Bay Program, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Eastern hellbender

    This large amphibian can be found crawling around the bottoms of clear, silt-free mountain streams. They are generally nocturnal, spending most of the day under rocks on the stream floor, emerging at night to hunt crayfish.  Visit the species profile...

  • Three brownish yellow mussels the smallest of which has a small white protrusion which the mussel uses to attach to a rock.
    Information icon Photo by Monte McGregor, Center Mollusk Conservation, Kentucky DFWR.

    Fanshell

    The fanshell is a green and yellow, medium sized mussel found in various rivers in Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia. It is protected as an endangered species.  Visit the species profile...

  • A brownish yellow mussel shell with white abrasions
    Information icon Photo by Monte McGregor, Center Mollusk Conservation, Kentucky DFWR.

    Littlewing pearlymussel

    The littlewing pearlymussel is a very small mussel found in cool-water streams in the Tennessee and Cumberland River basins in Alabama, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. It is protected as an endangered species.  Visit the species profile...

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