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Tag: Virginia

The content below has been tagged with the term “Virginia.”

Articles

  • A brown sign bent in half by high winds that reads St Vincent NWR
    Information icon The sand-clogged dock with St. Vincent NWR in the background. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Survivors of the storm

    October 22, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Bradley Smith seeks evidence that the red wolves survived Hurricane Michael off St. Vincent NWR. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS. Apalachicola, Florida — Bradley Smith stood tall on the bow of the SeaArk 21-footer with a VHF antenna held high. It was quiet, too quiet. It had been six days since Hurricane Michael devastated the Panhandle and Smith was listening for signs of life on St.  Learn more...

  • A fallen street sign blown over by high winds reads Mercedes Ave.
    Information icon Hurricane Michael bent the sign for Mercedes Ave. in half. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    The Battle for Mercedes Avenue

    October 14, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Panama City, Florida — The battle for Mercedes Avenue was joined. On one side stood an army of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service sawyers, swampers and heavy-equipment operators. On the other, a seemingly impenetrable forest of hurricane-downed pines and oaks blocking the street and keeping locals, utilities and ambulances from getting through. The Service’s sawyers readying to attack a tree. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS. Hurricane Michael had ripped across the Panhandle destroying houses, businesses and this city’s once-lovely tree canopy with equally reckless abandon.  Learn more...

  • A bowling alley with one wall and part of the roof blown off.
    Information icon A bowling alley on US 98 in the wake of Hurricane Michael. Photo by Dan Chapman.

    Service task forces start assisting in Hurricane Michael recovery

    October 13, 2018 | 5 minute read

    Panama City, Florida – The sawyers and engineers, swampers and commanders arrived in the dark Thursday unable to fully grasp what Hurricane Michael had wrought. But there was no mistaking the devastation when the two-dozen U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service workers woke Friday in this Panhandle town no longer recognizable. Virtually every tree for miles was down or damaged. Roofs disappeared from homes and businesses along U.S. 98 only to be found a block away.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A small black bird flies over a lush green marsh
    Information icon Eastern black rail in flight – Texas, April 2016. Photo © Jesse Huth, used with permission, Huth Avian Services.

    Proposed listing for the eastern black rail

    October 5, 2018 | 12 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to protect the eastern black rail, a small secretive marsh bird native to the United States, as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Partially migratory, the eastern black rail is known in as many as 36 states, plus multiple territories and countries in the Caribbean and Central and South America. It is one of four subspecies of black rail, which live in salt, brackish, and freshwater marshes.  Learn more...

  • A group of about a dozen small triangular shellfish in shallow water.
    Information icon Yellow lance in the Tar River in North Carolina. Photo by Sarah McRae, USFWS.

    Final rule to list the yellow lance mussel as threatened

    April 2, 2018 | 5 minute read

    How does the final listing rule differ from the proposed listing rule? In preparing this final rule, we reviewed and fully considered 22 public comments on the proposed rule. This final rule incorporates minor changes to our proposed listing based on the comments we received. The Species Status Assessment report report was updated based on comments and some additional information provided; many small, non-substantive changes and corrections were made throughout the document including ensuring consistency of colors on maps, providing details about data sources, updating references in threats section, and minor clarifications.  Learn more...

News

  • Seven small brownish-yellow mussels held in open hands by a biologist.
    Information icon Atlantic pigtoes ready for release. Photo by USFWS.

    Fish and Wildlife Service proposes threatened status for declining mussel

    October 10, 2018 | 5 minute read

    The Atlantic pigtoe, a freshwater mussel native to waters from Virginia to Georgia, has lost more than half of its historical range, and remaining populations may not be sustainable over time. To help this species and its habitat, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to extend protection for it as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Service also has identified areas that are essential for conservation of this freshwater mussel and proposes to designate 539 river miles in 16 units as critical habitat.  Read the full story...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Service proposes to list the eastern black rail as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    October 5, 2018 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners are working to protect a small, secretive marsh bird that is in steep decline. Some populations of the eastern black rail along the Atlantic coast have dropped by as much as 90 percent, and with a relatively small total population remaining across the eastern United States, the Service is proposing to list the subspecies as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Read the full story...

  • A huge circular cloud formation covering a huge portion of the visible earth as seen from space.
    Information icon Hurricane Florence is pictured from the International Space Station as a category 1 storm as it was making landfall near Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. Photo by NASA.

    Waters rise as storm crawls

    September 15, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Tropical Storm Florence, no longer a hurricane, continues moving slowly across the Carolinas, dumping historic amounts of rainfall on areas already under water. After making landfall Friday morning on the North Carolina coast, the storm is now headed toward Columbia, South Carolina, said meteorologist Denver Ingram. He briefed officials Saturday with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), who have been monitoring the storm from the Service’s Atlanta regional offices.  Read the full story...

  • A circular cloud seen from space.
    Information icon Hurricane Florence from the International Space Station. Photo by Astronaut Ricky Arnold, NASA.

    Service prepares for Hurricane Florence impact in Carolinas

    September 11, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Hurricane Florence has the Carolinas in her sights. The Category 4 storm, with winds of up to 130 miles per hour, is expected to hit the North Carolina coast north of Wilmington late Thursday night, bringing a storm surge of 4-12 feet, according to Kevin Scasny, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) meteorologist. Florence has the potential to cause “catastrophic damage,” Scasny said Tuesday morning on a planning conference call conducted by the Service.  Read the full story...

  • A group of about a dozen small triangular shellfish in shallow water.
    Information icon Yellow lance in the Tar River in North Carolina. Photo by Sarah McRae, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lists the yellow lance mussel as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    April 2, 2018 | 3 minute read

    Today, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced that the yellow lance mussel will be listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) following a rigorous evaluation of the best available science. Partnerships with state wildlife agencies and others have already been established to work toward improving habitat conditions for the mussel, which is one of nature’s most diligent water filterers. Yellow lance current range.  Read the full story...

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