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Tag: Virginia

The content below has been tagged with the term “Virginia.”

Articles

  • A green toad with dark spots in a biologist’s gloved hand
    Information icon Biologists at the Saratoga National Fish Hatchery in Wyoming hopped at the chance to raise the endangered Wyoming toad. Photo by USFWS.

    They’re growing what?

    November 6, 2019 | 9 minute read

    In Virginia and South Carolina hatcheries, biologists keep a close eye on shad and striped bass while taking time to focus on something that will never wear scales: mussels. And down in Florida, hatchery scientists charged with making sure rivers and streams are stocked with catfish and bass are singing the praises of a tiny bird they’re raising outside their labs. The Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery is growing alligator snapping turtles to boost that species’ population.  Learn more...

  • A small bird in hand with white patches on its wing and a red patch behind its eye
    Information icon A male red-cockaded woodpecker showing off the red feathers behind its head called a cockade. Photo © Robert B. Clontz, The Nature Conservancy.

    Joining forces

    August 27, 2019 | 7 minute read

    Fort Stewart, Georgia — As military partnerships go, this has to be one of the oddest, and strongest. The fighting men and women of the 3rd Infantry Division train alongside… red-cockaded woodpeckers. Ft. Stewart just west of Savannah and north of Hinesville, GA. Map by Roy Hewitt, USFWS. Soldiers maneuver the eastern edge of the army base under a canopy of longleaf pine where the iconic woodpeckers make their home.  Learn more...

  • Pink flowers with petals in a conical shape and a deep red stigma.
    Information icon Heather Alley near an experimental population she planted for her master thesis. Photo courtesy of Heather Alley.

    With help from many partners, the endangered smooth coneflower fights to come back

    August 16, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Droopy and slender pink petals give it a daisy-like appearance. Delicate, yet fierce, with a tall and spiked-domed center, it thrives in places that aren’t exactly dainty. Along power line rights-of-way, roadsides, dry slopes, and other disturbed places, the smooth coneflower fights to defend its turf. Left unchecked, trees and shrubs can opportunistically overpower the open prairie-like spaces that wildflowers call home. The smooth coneflower is an endangered wild plant in the aster family.  Learn more...

  • A pine forest with trees snapped in half by high winds and a bent speed limit sign
    Information icon Tyndall Air Force Base pine forests were scissored by Hurricane Michael. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    After Hurricane Michael

    November 29, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Camilla, Georgia — Hurricane Michael barreled across prime Southern timber territory, damaging five million acres of pines and hardwoods and destroying nearly $1.7 billion worth of marketable trees. Habitat for many of the region’s at-risk species — red-cockaded woodpeckers, gopher tortoises, eastern indigo snakes — was sundered. Red-cockaded woodpecker in flight. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service. Now, six weeks after Michael killed more than 45 people in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia, forest owners salvage timber, clear stands and pray for a market rebound.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A group of about a dozen small triangular shellfish in shallow water.
    Information icon Yellow lance in the Tar River in North Carolina. Photo by Sarah McRae, USFWS.

    Proposed critical habitat and draft economic analysis for yellow lance mussel

    February 5, 2020 | 8 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to designate 319 river miles of critical habitat for the yellow lance mussel in 11 units within Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina. What is critical habitat? Critical habitat is defined by the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as the specific geographic areas that contain features essential to the conservation of an endangered or threatened species and that may require special management and protection.  Learn more...

News

  • A group of about a dozen small triangular shellfish in shallow water.
    Information icon Yellow lance in the Tar River in North Carolina. Photo by Sarah McRae, USFWS.

    Service proposes critical habitat for yellow lance mussel

    February 5, 2020 | 4 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to designate critical habitat for the yellow lance freshwater mussel within Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina, including 154 river miles of habitat that overlap with other federally protected mussels and fish. Only areas currently occupied by the mussel, listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 2018, are included in the proposal. A draft economic analysis on the impacts of this action indicates minimal costs for stakeholders and private landowners.  Read the full story...

  • A lobster-shaped and colored crayfish with tinges of rust and blue.
    Information icon Big Sandy crayfish. Photo by Zachary Loughman, West Liberty University.

    Agency identifies habitat essential for the conservation of two rare crayfishes, seeks public comment

    January 27, 2020 | 3 minute read

    The Big Sandy and Guyandotte River crayfishes have disappeared from many of the streams they once occupied in Kentucky, Virginia and West Virginia, leading the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to protect both species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 2016. The agency has now completed the next step required by the ESA: identifying areas of habitat that are essential for the species’ conservation. Critical habitat helps focus conservation efforts where they are most needed, particularly those of federal agencies.  Read the full story...

  • A small yellow breasted bird with grey feathers.
    Information icon Kirtland’s warblers nest exclusively in jack pine stands. Photo by Joel Trick, USFWS.

    Partners celebrate successful recovery of beloved songbird

    October 8, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Bird enthusiasts from around the world travel to northern Michigan in hopes of catching sight of a Kirtland’s warbler, a small songbird once poised on the brink of extinction. Now the species is thriving thanks to decades of effort by a diverse group of dedicated partners. Due to the species’ remarkable recovery, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced that it no longer warrants protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Read the full story...

  • A bird of prey flying over a wetland.
    Information icon Everglades snail kite at Lake Kissimmee, Florida. Photo by South Florida Wetland Management District.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 36 Southeastern species

    April 11, 2019 | 6 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 36 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. They are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before June 10, 2019. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate, and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

  • A close-up shot of a small fish with a black line along it’s side and a bright red tip on it’s dorsal fin.
    Information icon Ashy darter. Photo by Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Thanks to conservation partnerships, two southeastern fish and a snail do not warrant Endangered Species Act protection

    April 3, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Following extensive scientific reviews, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that three southeastern animals do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future. Accordingly, the ashy darter, Barrens darter and Arkansas mudalia snail do not warrant Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection. For each animal, the Service brought together a team of biologists who compiled and examined all known data and research. Their peer-reviewed findings are outlined in species status assessments (SSAs), made available today.  Read the full story...

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