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Tag: Virginia Spiraea

The content below has been tagged with the term “Virginia Spiraea.”

Articles

  • Enduring investments

    August 23, 2014 | 1 minute read

    During September and October of 2013, staff from the Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office enjoyed opportunities to assist botanists from the Tennessee Division of Natural Areas – Natural Heritage Program as they monitored populations of Virginia spiraea (Spiraea virginiana) in Tennessee. This species is found in the states of Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia on flood-scoured cobble and boulder bars and bedrock outcrops, shaped by streams draining the rugged terrain of Southern Appalachia.  Learn more...

  • White flowers with many stamen burst from a shrub much like a hydrangea bush
    Information icon Virginia spiraea, Walker County, Georgia. Photo © Alan Cressler, used with permission.

    Hunt for Imperiled Plant Leads to Little Tennessee River Discovery

    June 16, 2008 | 3 minute read

    In late May, a team of biologists canoeing the Little Tennessee River discovered two new patches of the federally-protected Virginia spiraea plant growing on the river’s banks. The search was part of an effort to catalog where the rare plant is found along the river, and it also confirmed the plant’s continued presence at four spots where it was previously known to occur. “Knowing where these plants are means we know where to focus our time and energy in conserving the species,” said Dennis Desmond, search organizer and land stewardship coordinator for the Land Trust for the Little Tennessee.  Learn more...

Podcasts

  • Tall stems extending from the forest floor give way to bright white dangling flowers.
    Information icon White fringeless orchid. Photo by USFWS.

    North Carolina receives bog conservation grant

    August 24, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently announced 37.2 million dollars in grants to 20 states to support the conservation of threatened and endangered species across the nation, and a portion of that money is coming to the southern Appalachians. The North Carolina Plant Conservation Program is receiving more than $41,000 to help acquire seven Henderson County acres that are home to an endangered and a threatened plant.  Learn more...

  • Biologists look at clippings of an endangered plant
    Mary Frazer and Dennis Herman looking at Virginia spiraea. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Biologists search for rare plant along the Little Tennessee River

    November 16, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week, we’ll look at an effort to track an imperiled plant known from the banks of the Little Tennessee River. In late May, a team of biologists canoeing the Little Tennessee River discovered two new patches of the federally-protected Virginia spiraea plant growing on the river’s banks. Virginia spiraea was listed as threatened by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 1990, and today it’s found in seven states across Appalachia from West Virginia to Georgia, including seven counties in North Carolina.  Learn more...

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