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Tag: Virginia Big-Eared Bat

The content below has been tagged with the term “Virginia Big-Eared Bat.”

Articles

  • Eight fuzzy brown bats with large ears gathered in a small cluster on the roof of a cave.
    Information icon Small cluster of Virginia big-eared bats. Photo by Dave Riggs, CC BY-SA 2.0.

    Big-eared bat mystery solved in North Carolina

    March 21, 2019 | 6 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — A proposed highway widening project in 2010 led to the solution of a wildlife mystery, plus additional protection of North Carolina’s only endangered Virginia big-eared bat population. The Virginia big-eared bat was placed on the federal endangered species list in 1979. Found mainly in Virginia, West Virginia, and Kentucky, there is one population in North Carolina. In the early 1980s, scientists discovered two hibernation sites for that North Carolina population, a pair of caves at Grandfather Mountain.  Learn more...

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    A unique mountain refuge protects endangered wetlands and the wildlife within

    August 24, 2017 | 8 minute read

    East Flat Rock, North Carolina – It’s not much to look at really. Nothing about this all-too-familiar stretch of Southern blacktop indicates that a rare, beautiful and endangered flower thrives just beyond the railroad tracks. There’s a convenience store, a small engine repair shop, a few modest homes. General Electric makes lights at a factory up the road. Bat Fork Creek meanders nearby. Below the tracks, though, in an Appalachian mountain bog, bunched arrowheads rise from soggy ground.  Learn more...

  • Two woman in a dark cave wearing head-to-toe coverings.
    Information icon Sue Cameron, USFWS (left), Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC (right) checking a mine wall for bats. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Biologists work to solve bat mystery in Western North Carolina mountains

    February 12, 2013 | 4 minute read

    In North Carolina, endangered Virginia big-eared bats are known from only two caves at Grandfather Mountain, where they hibernate. What has puzzled biologists for years is where these bats go in the summer to give birth. This spring a massive effort aims to answer that question. About 12,000 Virginia big-eared bats are known to exist in four states and 400 of those hibernate in the Grandfather Mountain caves. This species typically hibernates in one place, and with warmer weather, the two sexes each migrate to different locations for the summer, with the females departing to give birth and rear their young in a maternity colony.  Learn more...

News

  • A brown bat attached to the roof of a cave with white fuzz around its nose
    Information icon In this 2016 photo, a tri-colored bat with evidence of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) hibernates on the wall of the Black Diamond Tunnel in the North Georgia mountains. Photo by Pete Pattavina, USFWS.

    White-nose syndrome decimates North Carolina’s bats

    April 29, 2013 | 4 minute read

    Biologists with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) have determined that white-nose syndrome (WNS) continues to decimate bat populations in western North Carolina, with some infected locations showing up to a 95 percent decline in hibernating bats over the past one to two years. The disease, which has been confirmed in seven counties in western North Carolina, does not affect people. Wildlife Commission biologists surveying bat populations have documented declining bat populations by site.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • Dozens of brown bats with long ears attached to the roof of a cave in a cluster.
    Cluster of Virginia big-eared bats (Corynorhinus townsendii virginianus). Photo by Dave Riggs, CC BY-SA 2.0.

    North Carolina’s endangered bats

    September 10, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. 2013 marks the 40th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act, an anniversary we’re marking by taking a closer look at some of the endangered species of the Southern Appalachians. In the eastern United States, it’s hard to talk about bat conservation without mentioning white nose syndrome – the bat disease that’s decimating many species as it spreads from the New York area where it was first discovered.  Learn more...

  • Dozens of brown bats with long ears attached to the roof of a cave in a cluster.
    Information icon Cluster of Virginia big-eared bats (Corynorhinus townsendii virginianus). Photo by Dave Riggs, CC BY-SA 2.0.

    Searching for bat maternity colonies

    January 2, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. What happened to the Lost Colony at Roanoke? Where is the Lost Dutchman Mine? Did Lee Harvey Oswalt act alone? Where do Grandfather Mountain’s female bats go in the summer? Tremendous mysteries all. The caves of Grandfather Mountain serve as a hibernation site, or hibernaculum, for a group of endangered Virginia big-eared bats. What biologists are clueless about is where these bats go when it warms up.  Learn more...

  • Dozens of brown bats with long ears attached to the roof of a cave in a cluster.
    Information icon Cluster of Virginia big-eared bats (Corynorhinus townsendii virginianus). Photo by Dave Riggs, CC BY-SA 2.0.

    Grants go to help the struggle against White Nose Syndrome

    January 12, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Winter is approaching - a season that has become a time of apprehension among wildlife biologists. White nose syndrome, a mysterious affliction responsible for the deaths of more than a million bats, is most lethal during this time, and the collective hibernation of bats means winter presents the greatest opportunity for spreading the malady. In response to the threat of white nose syndrome, the Fish and Wildlife Service recently announced $800,000 in grants to fund six research projects that will provide insight into this mysterious, menacing threat, and help ensure the survival of some of our rarest bats.  Learn more...

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