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Tag: Venus Flytrap

The content below has been tagged with the term “Venus Flytrap.”

Articles

  • A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.
    Information icon Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

    Buyer beware: Do not buy poached Venus flytrap plants

    June 17, 2020 | 4 minute read

    Venus flytrap is North Carolina’s official carnivorous plant. Throughout the world, it is recognized as an iconic insect-eating plant and is a popular potted plant that has captured our imaginations. The Venus flytrap is endemic to North and South Carolina, but it has been introduced to a few other states. Unfortunately, in the wild, populations continue to decline. The North Carolina Plant Conservation Program lists the Venus flytrap as a species of Special Concern-Vulnerable in North Carolina, and poaching of this plant became a felony in 2014.  Learn more...

  • Boy scouts walk in a line through a young stand of pine trees.
    Information icon The Cape Fear Council of the Boy Scouts of America has been helping restore longleaf pine at a camp in North Carolina. Photo by Jacob Jay.

    Planting for the future

    January 8, 2020 | 5 minute read

    Reveille sounds. Long lines of uniformed Boy Scouts circle the flagpole. Pledges and singing follow. Out beyond this morning ritual, stately young longleaf pine trees proudly peek over swaying grasses. The Cape Fear Council of the Boy Scouts of America is restoring the longleaf pine ecosystem and awakening its rich history at Camp Bowers in eastern North Carolina. They are contributing to the goal of the America’s Longleaf Initiative to bring back an ecosystem that once spanned from Virginia to Texas, and in North Carolina supports unique wildlife such as the Venus flytrap, which is considered at risk in the wild.  Learn more...

News

  • A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.
    Information icon Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

    Bat, snail, and popular plant may need endangered species protection

    December 19, 2017 | 5 minute read

    More research is needed on three species before U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials can determine whether to add them to the threatened and endangered species list. More scientific and commercial information will be compiled for the Venus flytrap, located in the Carolinas; oblong rocksnail, located in Alabama; and tricolored bat, located in 38 states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. The Service and its partners will continue to research the species’ life history, biological requirements and habitats to develop a Species Status Assessment (SSA) and 12-month finding.  Read the full story...

  • A spiny flower with thin, bright purple petals.
    Information icon Smooth Purple Coneflower, Echinacea laevigata. Photo by Suzanne Cadwell, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    2016 National and Regional Recovery Champions

    May 19, 2017 | 8 minute read

    On Endangered Species Day, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region celebrates the contributions and achievements of our nationally recognized Recovery Champions and regionally recognized Recovery Champions. These dedicated individuals have devoted themselves to recovering endangered and threatened animals and plants, and the Service is grateful for their hard work. 2016 National Recovery Champions Chris Lucash, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Chris Lucash in the field monitoring for red wolves.  Read the full story...

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