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Tag: Trispot Darter

The content below has been tagged with the term “Trispot Darter.”

Articles

  • A creek runs through a forest.
    Information icon Ohatchee creek, a tributary of the Coosa River in Alabama. Photo by Paul Johnson, ADCNR.

    Stalking the rare painted rocksnail

    April 12, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Calhoun County, Alabama — Biologists Nathan Whelan and Paul Johnson weren’t sure what they’d find when they launched their boat on that balmy Alabama morning. Whelan, a biologist currently serving as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s regional geneticist for the Southeast Region, was updating a scientific manuscript on the painted rocksnail, and needed the most recent information on its current range. The painted rocksnail is a rather cryptic-looking small-to-medium sized freshwater snail with yellowish-brown coloring.  Learn more...

  • Mature trees form a canopy shading the river from the sun.
    Conasauga River shaded by trees. Photo by USFWS.

    Saving an endangered southern river

    March 22, 2017 | 6 minute read

    Crandall, Georgia – The Conasauga River courses through Jimmy Petty’s corn, bean and dairy farm near the Tennessee line. The Conasauga River flows through Jimmy Petty’s farm near Crandall, Ga. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS. Petty and his brothers own seven miles of riverfront, much of it covered one recent morning in bright green winter wheat, along both sides of the Conasauga. The mountains of the Chattahoochee National Forest offer a postcard-perfect backdrop.  Learn more...

  • Service and its partners remove another dam in greater Birmingham area, improves aquatic habitat

    November 22, 2013 | 4 minute read

    Big Canoe Creek is home to some of America’s rarest aquatic species. A project sponsored by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is already dramatically improving water quality and habitat of the creek, giving those imperiled species a better chance at recovery.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A small fish with brown and white spots swimming in front of small rocks.
    Information icon Trispot darter. Photo by Dick Biggins, USFWS.

    Final listing of the trispot darter, proposed 4(d) rule, proposed critical habitat

    January 30, 2019 | 12 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? Based on a review of the best available information and full status assessment, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is listing the trispot darter as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Service is also proposing a 4(d) rule and critical habitat. Check out the press release for this decision. What does it mean when a species is threatened?  Learn more...

  • A small fish with bright blue fins and orange coloring on its back.
    Information icon Trispot darter. Photo by Pat O'Neil, Geological Survey of Alabama.

    Frequently asked questions for the proposed listing of the trispot darter

    October 3, 2017 | 9 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? Based on a review of the best available information and full status assessment, the Service is proposing to list the trispot darter as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). What does it mean when a species is threatened? A species is listed in one of two categories: endangered or threatened. An endangered species is one that is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range.  Learn more...

News

  • A small fish with brown and white spots swimming in front of small rocks.
    Information icon Trispot darter. Photo by Dick Biggins, USFWS.

    Unique fish gets endangered species protection with proposed exemptions and critical habitat

    January 30, 2019 | 6 minute read

    A small, colorful fish found in the Coosa River Basin is now federally protected. On January 29, 2018, the trispot darter was formally recognized as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is now proposing exemptions to otherwise prohibited activities under the ESA. The exemptions, included in a 4(d) rule, mark the ESA’s flexibility in allowing for certain management activities to continue because of their overall benefit to the long-term status of the listed darter.  Read the full story...

  • A small fish with bright blue fins and orange coloring on its back.
    Information icon Trispot darter. Photo by Pat O'Neil, Geological Survey of Alabama.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes protection for rare darter in Coosa River Basin

    October 3, 2017 | 4 minute read

    A unique fish that acts like a tiny salmon needs protection. The trispot darter, a small, colorful fish found in parts of the Coosa River Basin in southeastern Tennessee, northern Georgia, and northern Alabama, is disappearing. Following a scientifically rigorous review of the darter, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is proposing to list the species as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Every year this short-lived fish, which is less than two inches long, swims upstream from the larger river habitat where it usually lives so it can spawn in the vegetation of small tributaries and seeps.  Read the full story...

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