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Tag: Tri-Colored Bat

The content below has been tagged with the term “Tri-Colored Bat.”

Articles

  • A brown, furry bat attached to the roof of a humid cave
    Information icon A tri-colored bat Fern Cave National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Michael Senn, USFWS.

    To the bat cave!

    July 25, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Paint Rock, Alabama — Nothing really distinguishes Nat Mountain from its hilly neighbors amid the southern foothills of the Appalachian Mountains. It’s not particularly tall at 1,600 feet. It offers no sweeping summertime views, except snatches of distant mountains and the curvaceous Paint Rock River. It’s home to the Fern Cave National Wildlife Refuge, but, on the surface, there’s really nothing to do here. It’s what’s below ground that tantalizes.  Learn more...

  • A brown bat attached to the roof of a cave with white fuzz around its nose
    Information icon In this 2016 photo, a tri-colored bat with evidence of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) hibernates on the wall of the Black Diamond Tunnel in the North Georgia mountains. Photo by Pete Pattavina, USFWS.

    Disease continues its fatal sweep of bats

    March 14, 2017 | 5 minute read

    The oars splashed, that slight sound magnified as it echoed off rock walls that led to a distant, black point. With each pull, the tunnel’s illuminated opening got smaller – the darkness, greater. Pete Pattavina paused in mid-paddle. He saw a cluster of creatures. They hung from the wall as the boat floated past. Each was a bat, folded in winter slumber. One day soon, they’d leave their hibernaculum in the mountains of North Georgia.  Learn more...

  • A brown bat attached to the roof of a cave with white fuzz around its nose
    Information icon In this 2016 photo, a tri-colored bat with evidence of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) hibernates on the wall of the Black Diamond Tunnel in the North Georgia mountains. Photo by Pete Pattavina, USFWS.

    Malady deadly to bats found in North Carolina

    February 9, 2011 | 4 minute read

    White-nose syndrome, the disease that has killed hundreds of thousands of bats in the Eastern United States, has been discovered in a retired Avery County mine and in a cave at Grandfather Mountain State Park, marking the arrival of the disease in North Carolina. “White-nose syndrome is confirmed in Virginia and Tennessee, so we expected we would be one of the next states to see the disease,” said Gabrielle Graeter, a biologist with the N.  Learn more...

News

  • A brown bat attached to the roof of a cave with white fuzz around its nose
    Information icon In this 2016 photo, a tri-colored bat with evidence of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) hibernates on the wall of the Black Diamond Tunnel in the North Georgia mountains. Photo by Pete Pattavina, USFWS.

    White-nose syndrome decimates North Carolina’s bats

    April 29, 2013 | 4 minute read

    Biologists with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) have determined that white-nose syndrome (WNS) continues to decimate bat populations in western North Carolina, with some infected locations showing up to a 95 percent decline in hibernating bats over the past one to two years. The disease, which has been confirmed in seven counties in western North Carolina, does not affect people. Wildlife Commission biologists surveying bat populations have documented declining bat populations by site.  Read the full story...

  • A small brown bat on the roof of a cave with a fuzzy white fungus on its nose.
    A tri-color bat in the Avery County with white-nose syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    Bat disease white-nose syndrome confirmed in South Carolina

    March 11, 2013 | 3 minute read

    The S.C. Department of Natural Resources recently received confirmation that white-nose syndrome, a disease that has killed millions of bats in eastern North American, is now officially in South Carolina. Until now, South Carolina appeared to be insulated from white-nose syndrome (WNS). However, a dead bat discovered recently at Table Rock State Park in northern Pickens County has been confirmed to have WNS, which spreads mainly through bat-to-bat contact and has not been found to infect humans or other animals.  Read the full story...

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