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Tag: Toe River

The content below has been tagged with the term “Toe River.”

Podcasts

  • A woman helps three girls identify invertebrates in a net.
    Angie Rodgers of the N.C. Natural Heritage Program helps a group of girls check their net for macroinvertebrates. . Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Toe River Valley Festival

    October 17, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The first toe in the cold water of Yancey County’s South Toe River usually brings shrieks among many fifth-graders, but the excitement of getting to wade the river during school keeps them going. They were enjoying the third-annual Toe River Valley Festival, a four-day educational event that brings nearly every 5th grade student in North Carolina’s Yancey County to the South Toe River, while Mitchell County students head to the North Toe River in Spruce Pine.  Learn more...

  • Dozens of kayakers out on the water.
    Mountain Heritage High School students enjoy a paddle down the North Toe River.. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Paddling the South Toe River

    September 5, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. We put our boats in Yancey County’s South Toe River at a small sandy beach amidst the abutments of the highway 19 bridge. We paddled from there to the river’s confluence with the North Toe River, a trip of several hours, through one of the most remote sections of river in Western North Carolina. There’s going to be a wastewater treatment plant built along this stretch of river.  Learn more...

  • A piece of heavy machinery deconstructs a small dam.
    A trackhoe begins the work of demolishing Dillsboro Dam. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Stream barriers in the Upper Nolichucky River system

    May 30, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. While improvements in water quality can literally mean life or death for fish populations, there is another facet to the story of creating vibrant, bountiful, healthy rivers. What if a fish had miles and miles of cool, clear, clean river to enjoy, but couldn’t get to it? It’s an issue faced across the Southern Appalachians as poorly designed, installed, or maintained bridges and culverts can block passage by fish, crayfish, and other aquatic life.  Learn more...

  • A dozen children check out small insects that were collected in the river.
    Students gathered around the macroinvertebrate table. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Getting kids in the water

    November 10, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Most of the kids entered the water with eager anticipation, net in hand, happily getting their shoes and shorts wet while adult not only looked on, but encouraged them to explore the river. It was the second annual Toe River Valley Festival, an event that brought nearly every 5th grader in North Carolina’s Yancey and Mitchell County’s out into a river in their community.  Learn more...

  • A dozen children check out small insects that were collected in the river.
    Students gathered around the macroinvertebrate table. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Six graders get chance to explore their river

    June 29, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Each year, late in the spring, I get an invitation from the 6th grade teachers at East Yancey Middle School to join their students at Black Mountain Campground, just downhill from Mount Mitchell. The students don waders, grab a net and we wade the South Toe River, looking for crayfish, mayflies, and other creepy crawlies living in the stream. Officially tasked with identifying the animals they find and determining what their presence says about the quality of the stream, I feel certain that what the kids took home wasn’t an understanding of the water quality requirements of a stonefly, but memories of the day they went to school and were allowed to get wet and explore a river.  Learn more...

  • Regional Director honors Appalachian conservationists

    June 22, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature A decrepit dam on the North Toe River has been removed thanks to their efforts. A railroad trestle that collapsed into the Toe River has been removed thanks to their efforts. Hundreds of school children get to experience rivers first hand thanks to their efforts. Numerous private landowners have improved wildlife habitat on their land thanks to their efforts.  Learn more...

  • A dragonfly emerging from a protective shell attached to a blade of grass
    Dragonfly emerging from a nymph stage. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Aquatic macroinvertebrates

    October 30, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. “This is not the same animal I saw flying around this morning, is it?” asked one teacher, standing knee-deep in the South Toe River, looking at an insect crawling around an ice cube tray. The animal in question was a dragonfly. Nearly all of us have seen a dragonfly, but what most of us probably don’t know is that large flying insect lived the early part of its life looking entirely different and crawling along the bottom of a stream or pond.  Learn more...

  • Spruce Pine dam finally comes down

    September 18, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript A little bit of river history was recently made in Western North Carolina as a decrepit dam was removed from the North Toe River in Mitchell County. The dam was built in 1918, but it has been abandoned since the 1940s or 50s. It was partially dynamited in 1960 to clear accumulated silt. What remains are massive slabs of concrete and scattered pieces of the dam’s inner workings.  Learn more...

  • Train wreck on the North Toe River

    August 14, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. It’s the telephone call a biologist never wants to get – the chemical spill, the fish kill, the accident that makes you stop everything else. The most recent was a train wreck along the North Toe River in Mitchell County. Fortunately no one was hurt. The train, carrying ethanol and propane among other things, derailed on the banks of the North Toe River, home to the endangered Appalachian elktoe mussel.  Learn more...

  • Three women in wet suits snorkeling in a shallow river.
    Oconaluftee River snorkelers. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Endangered Species Day 2008

    December 6, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week we’re going to look at the recent Endangered Species Day celebration and the ongoing challenge to protect endangered species in the Southern Appalachians. There weren’t a lot of takers for snorkeling. It was the North Toe River, on Mitchell/Yancey County line and ten students from the local high school’s Eco-Club were in the river with Fish and Wildlife Service biologists, looking for mussels.  Learn more...

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