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Tag: Threatened Species

The content below has been tagged with the term “Threatened Species.”

Articles

  • A wooden sign nailed to a tree in the woods that reads.
    Information icon Signs marking a longleaf pine stand on Dr. John Bembrys farm in Hawkinsville, Georgia. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Would wood work?

    July 14, 2021 | 8 minute read

    Hawkinsville, Georgia – Dr. John Bembry roams his 2,200-acre tree farm pointing out the ecological wonders bestowed by “the good Lord.” Here, he says, is an age-old longleaf pine stand towering over wiregrass and gallberry scrub. There’s a gopher tortoise whose sandy burrow provides shelter for hundreds of creatures. And that cypress-kneed swamp – Bembry prefers “mill pond” – is filled with bass, bream, catfish and white perch. “I’ve always had a very strong environmental ethic.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A small fish with a tan underbelly and brown markings.
    Information icon Pearl darter. Photo credit USFWS.

    Proposed Critical Habitat for the Pearl Darter in Mississippi: Frequently Asked Questions

    July 12, 2021 | 7 minute read

    What is the pearl darter? The pearl darter (Percina aurora) is a small (2 to 2.5 inches long) snub-nosed fish found in pools or deep runs of flowing streams and rivers. It is a bottom dwelling species generally found over sand, gravel, or bedrock in slow to moderate currents. Where does it occur?  Native to the Pascagoula River system of Mississippi and the Pearl River system of Mississippi and Louisiana, pearl darters continue to survive in the Pascagoula River system but have not been seen in the Pearl River system for more than 40 years.  Learn more...

  • A tiny white flower bloom amongst green large leaves.
    Information icon Palo de rosa in bloom. Photo by Omar Monsegur, USFWS.

    Frequently Asked Questions: Proposal to Reclassify Palo de Rosa From Endangered to Threatened

    What is palo de rosa? Palo de rosa is the common name of Ottochulzia rhodoxylon, an evergreen tree that may reach up to 49 feet (15 m) in height and 16 inches (40 cm) in diameter. Its common name comes from its pink colored wood. Palo de rosa also has smooth, dark gray branches and bisexual flowers arranged singly or in clusters at the leaf bases. The fruit is about one inch long and almost one inch wide, smooth and has a thin covering that turns dark purple when ripe.  Learn more...

  • A tiny white flower bloom amongst green large leaves.
    Information icon Palo de rosa in bloom; Photo credit – Omar Monsegur, USFWS.

    Propuesta para re-clasificar el árbol de palo de rosa de en peligro de extinción a amenazado

    ¿Qué es palo de rosa? Palo de rosa es el nombre común de Ottoschulzia rhodoxylon, un árbol perenne que puede alcanzar hasta 49 pies (15 m) de altura y 16 pulgadas (40 cm) de diámetro. Su nombre común proviene de su madera de color rosa. El palo de rosa tiene ramas lisas de color gris oscuro y flores bisexuales dispuestas individualmente o en grupos en las bases de las hojas.  Learn more...

News

  • A tiny white flower bloom amongst green large leaves.
    Information icon Palo de rosa in bloom; Photo credit – Omar Monsegur, USFWS.

    El Servicio Federal de Pesca y Vida Silvestre propone reclasificar a palo de rosa de especie en peligro de extinción a amenazada: Preguntas Frecuentes

    July 19, 2021 | 5 minute read

    Gracias a los exitosos esfuerzos de colaboradores locales el árbol de palo de rosa está en camino hacia la recuperación. Este árbol perenne, cuyo nombre en español describe su madera de color rosa y el cual ocurre en Puerto Rico y República Dominicana, ha mostrado mejoras sustanciales desde que fue incluido como una especie en peligro de extinción bajo la Ley Federal de Especies en Peligro (ESA, por sus siglas en inglés) en 1990.  Read the full story...

  • A parrot mid-flight with vibrant green feathers, with blue feathering on the tip of the wings. And red feathers above the beak
    Information icon Puerto Rican Parrot in flight. Photo by Jan Paul Zegarra, Biologist, USFWS

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Conducts Five-year Status Reviews of 37 Southeastern Species

    July 13, 2021 | 3 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 37 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are primarily found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico, but are also known to occur in Delaware, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, Texas, and Virginia. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before September 13, 2021.  Read the full story...

  • A tiny white flower bloom amongst green large leaves.
    Information icon Palo de rosa in bloom; Photo credit – Omar Monsegur, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Proposes to Reclassify Palo de Rosa from Endangered to Threatened

    July 13, 2021 | 4 minute read

    Thanks to successful efforts by local and federal partners, the palo de rosa tree is on the path to recovery. The evergreen tree whose Spanish name describes its pink-colored wood, located in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic, has shown substantial improvements since it was listed as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1990. Based on a review of the best available scientific and commercial information, the U.  Read the full story...

  • Tiny yellow fish with brown speckling.
    Information icon Pearl darter. Photo credit: M. Wagner, USFWS.

    Service Proposes Critical Habitat for Threatened Pearl Darter in Mississippi

    July 12, 2021 | 5 minute read

    Today, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to designate critical habitat for the pearl darter, a small fish native to the Pascagoula River system of Mississippi and the Pearl River system of Mississippi and Louisiana. Pearl darters continue to survive in the Pascagoula River system but have not been seen in the Pearl River system for more than 40 years. “The protection of the pearl darter in 2017 under the Endangered Species Act paved the way for us to work together with our conservation partners in Mississippi on recovering the species,” said Leopoldo Miranda-Castro, the Service’s Regional Director.  Read the full story...

Wildlife

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