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Tag: Texas

The content below has been tagged with the term “Texas.”

Articles

  • A building built on steel footings ready for hurricane force winds.
    Information icon The rebuilt Grand Bay National Wildlife Refuge visitor's center built to withstand future storms.

    Service facilities built to withstand nature’s worst

    November 9, 2017 | 5 minute read

    Hurricanes are never welcome, but they can prompt changes in buildings to make them better, stronger, and more capable of handling high water and even higher winds.  Learn more...

  • A man posing for a selfie in front of the Pelican Island NWR sign.
    Information icon Jeremy Edwardson stands before a sign for Pelican Island National Wildlife Refuge. The island was turned into a national refuge for birds in 1903. Photo courtesy of Jeremy Edwardson, USFWS.

    Jeremy Edwardson, deputy project leader at the Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge Complex

    August 14, 2017 | 3 minute read

    When Jeremy Edwardson tells you he always wanted the type of job he has with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, you can take him at his word. While still only an undergraduate pursuing a Bachelor of Science in wildlife management at Tarleton State University in Stephenville, Texas, he’d already built an impressive wildlife-related resume. He was a member of the student chapter of the Wildlife Society; had served as the president of the student chapter of Ducks Unlimited; was a part-owner and the wildlife manager of a hunting outfitting business; had been a wildlife program guide at a prestigious hunting lodge; had led hunts for youths as a certified huntmaster with the Texas Youth Hunting Program; and had worked as a biological science aid as an intern at the Service’s Aransas National Wildlife Refuge.  Learn more...

  • A brown and black raptor takes flight from a tree limb
    Information icon Harris’ hawk. Photo by khyri, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Two Harris’ hawks seized in North Carolina returning home to Texas

    December 18, 2009 | 4 minute read

    A pair of Harris’ hawks, unlawfully captured in Texas and brought to North Carolina, are being treated to a plane ride back to their south Texas home today, the culmination of nearly two months of effort that included law enforcement officers, raptor biologists, and Delta Air Lines. In October, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department received a tip about the birds through their Operation Game Thief wildlife crime stoppers program.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A patterned black and gray snake blends in to the strewn, dark pine needles on the forest floor.
    Information icon Louisiana pinesnake. Photo by Michael Sealy, USFWS.

    Proposed listing of the Louisiana pinesnake under the Endangered Species Act, and the proposed 4(d) exemption rule

    October 5, 2016 | 7 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is reopening the public comment period on its October 2016 proposal to list the Louisiana pinesnake as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Service at the same time is proposing a series of exemptions to land management activities in what is called a “4(d) rule” because it refers to Section 4(d) of the ESA.  Learn more...

  • A large black bear with a small cub nestled in the upper branches of a hardwood tree.
    Information icon Louisiana black bear female with her two cubs in a tree. Photo by Clint Turnage, USDA.

    Louisiana black bear removed from the list of threatened and endangered species due to recovery

    March 10, 2016 | 11 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced on March 10, 2016, it will officially remove the Louisiana black bear (Ursus americanus luteolus) from the Lists of Threatened and Endangered Wildlife under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) due to recovery. The Service published a proposed rule to delist the bear on May 21, 2015. Why is the Service delisting the Louisiana black bear? Due to the efforts of the Service and its partners, the threats to the Louisiana black bear have been eliminated or reduced, and adequate regulatory mechanisms exist for its long-term protection.  Learn more...

News

Podcasts

  • Two reddish brown hawks perched on a fence post.
    Harris hawks. Photo by Emilio del Prado, CC BY-SA 2.0.

    Harris’ hawks return to Texas

    February 9, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. A pair of Harris’ hawks, unlawfully captured in Texas and brought to North Carolina, were recently treated to a plane ride back to their south Texas home, the culmination of nearly two months of effort by law enforcement officers, raptor biologists, and Delta Air Lines. In October, officers with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department received a tip about the birds through their wildlife crime stoppers program.  Learn more...

Wildlife

  • Three brown birds swimming on still water
    Information icon American wigeon. Photo by Mike Wintroath, AGFC.

    American wigeon

    American wigeon are a medium-sized dabbling duck, and males have a distinctive white patch on their head that historically gave them the nickname “baldpate.” This species can be aggressive when competing for food and is a highly flexible forager, equally at home stealing food from diving ducks in deep water or grazing on turf grasses in urban areas. Conservation status Low concern. Range American wigeons occur across all four North American flyways, but they are most abundant in the Pacific and Central flyways.  Visit the species profile...

  • A brown and grey duck with a black belly standing at the entrance to a large birdhouse
    Information icon Black-bellied whistling duck. Photo by Stacey Hayden, USFWS.

    Black-bellied whistling duck

    The black-bellied whistling duck is sometimes described as part goose and part duck because of its rather peculiar physical features and behaviors. Like many goose species, black-bellied whistling ducks graze on grasses in upland areas, but they also nest in tree cavities similar to wood ducks. This species is highly gregarious, adaptable to using urban areas, and highly recognizable due to its pink bill and legs. Conservation Status Low concern.  Visit the species profile...

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