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Tag: Texas

The content below has been tagged with the term “Texas.”

Articles

  • A green toad with dark spots in a biologist’s gloved hand
    Information icon Biologists at the Saratoga National Fish Hatchery in Wyoming hopped at the chance to raise the endangered Wyoming toad. Photo by USFWS.

    They’re growing what?

    November 6, 2019 | 9 minute read

    In Virginia and South Carolina hatcheries, biologists keep a close eye on shad and striped bass while taking time to focus on something that will never wear scales: mussels. And down in Florida, hatchery scientists charged with making sure rivers and streams are stocked with catfish and bass are singing the praises of a tiny bird they’re raising outside their labs. The Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery is growing alligator snapping turtles to boost that species’ population.  Learn more...

  • A small bird in hand with white patches on its wing and a red patch behind its eye
    Information icon A male red-cockaded woodpecker showing off the red feathers behind its head called a cockade. Photo © Robert B. Clontz, The Nature Conservancy.

    Joining forces

    August 27, 2019 | 7 minute read

    Fort Stewart, Georgia — As military partnerships go, this has to be one of the oddest, and strongest. The fighting men and women of the 3rd Infantry Division train alongside… red-cockaded woodpeckers. Ft. Stewart just west of Savannah and north of Hinesville, GA. Map by Roy Hewitt, USFWS. Soldiers maneuver the eastern edge of the army base under a canopy of longleaf pine where the iconic woodpeckers make their home.  Learn more...

  • A deep red, wooden baseball bat commemorating the opening of Fayetteville’s new baseball stadium
    Information icon A baseball bat commemorating the City of Fayetteville, North Carolina’s bew baseball stadium groundbreaking - August 21, 2017. Photo by the City of Fayetteville.

    Endangered woodpecker is baseball’s newest mascot

    November 13, 2018 | 3 minute read

    Minor League Baseball has a new mascot, a new team: the Fayetteville Woodpeckers. The team, based in Fayetteville, North Carolina, has adopted the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker to adorn team caps, shirts and other items. Note the bat; that bird’s been busy. Photo courtesy of the Fayetteville Woodpeckers. Take a look at the all-new mascot for the all-new Fayetteville Woodpeckers Minor League Baseball team. Note the fierce gleam in the eye, topped by a scarlet crest.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A patterned black and gray snake blends in to the strewn, dark pine needles on the forest floor.
    Information icon Louisiana pinesnake. Photo by Michael Sealy, USFWS.

    Louisiana pinesnake final 4(d) rule

    February 26, 2020 | 6 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) taking? The Service is finalizing a rule under section 4(d) of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) for the Louisiana pinesnake, a reptile from Louisiana and Texas. This rule will reduce regulatory burdens while providing for the pinesnake’s conservation. What is a Louisiana pinesnake and where can they be found? Reaching up to about five feet long, Louisiana pinesnakes are non-venomous and secretive in nature, spending much of their time underground in burrows of its pocket gopher prey  Learn more...

  • A black beetle with orange markings on its back, the ends of its antenae and its fore legs
    Information icon American burying beetle. Photo by Mark Dumont, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    American burying beetle Endangered Species Act downlisting proposal and 4(d) rule

    May 1, 2019 | 13 minute read

    What is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposing? The Service is proposing to downlist the American burying beetle from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). This proposal is based on a thorough review of the best available science and information, including the recently completed Species Status Assessment (SSA), indicating the beetle is not presently in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range.  Learn more...

  • A small black bird flies over a lush green marsh
    Information icon Eastern black rail in flight – Texas, April 2016. Photo © Jesse Huth, used with permission, Huth Avian Services.

    Proposed listing for the eastern black rail

    October 5, 2018 | 12 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to protect the eastern black rail, a small secretive marsh bird native to the United States, as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Partially migratory, the eastern black rail is known in as many as 36 states, plus multiple territories and countries in the Caribbean and Central and South America. It is one of four subspecies of black rail, which live in salt, brackish, and freshwater marshes.  Learn more...

News

  • A patterned black and gray snake blends in to the strewn, dark pine needles on the forest floor.
    Information icon Louisiana pinesnake. Photo by Michael Sealy, USFWS.

    Service finalizes 4(d) rule to aid conservation of Louisiana pinesnake and support landowner efforts

    February 26, 2020 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has finalized a special 4(d) rule for the Louisiana pinesnake, tailoring conservation protections for the snake while ensuring greater regulatory certainty for landowners. The Louisiana pinesnake was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 2018 and landowners play a critical role in its conservation and recovery. “Conservation agencies, non-profit groups and the timber industry are all taking steps to reverse the decline of the Louisiana pinesnake and its habitat,” said Leopoldo Miranda, Service regional director for the South Atlantic Gulf and Mississippi Basin.  Read the full story...

  • Two black and white birds on the edge of a body of water.
    Information icon Interior least tern. Photo by USFWS.

    Recovery of America’s smallest tern prompts proposal to delist

    October 23, 2019 | 5 minute read

    When the interior least tern was listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1985, there were fewer than 2,000 birds and only a few dozen nesting sites scattered across a once-expansive range that covered America’s Great Plains and Lower Mississippi Valley. Today there are more than 18,000 interior least terns at more than 480 nesting sites in 18 states, thanks to decades of innovative conservation efforts and diverse partnerships among local, state and federal stakeholders.  Read the full story...

  • A black beetle with orange markings on its back, the ends of its antenae and its fore legs
    Information icon American burying beetle. Photo by Mark Dumont, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Conservation partnerships lead to proposed downlisting of American burying beetle

    May 1, 2019 | 5 minute read

    The American burying beetle, one of nature’s most unique creatures, appears to be more plentiful, thanks in part to the efforts of a wide array of partners across its range. Following the beetle’s listing in 1989 as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and stakeholders implemented conservation and recovery efforts, and now the Service is proposing to downlist it from endangered to threatened.  Read the full story...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Service proposes to list the eastern black rail as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    October 5, 2018 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners are working to protect a small, secretive marsh bird that is in steep decline. Some populations of the eastern black rail along the Atlantic coast have dropped by as much as 90 percent, and with a relatively small total population remaining across the eastern United States, the Service is proposing to list the subspecies as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Read the full story...

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