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Tag: Tennessee

The content below has been tagged with the term “Tennessee.”

Articles

  • A sign explains the hirstorical significance of the Florida torreya with a white house in the background.
    Information icon The Gregory House with propped-up torreya. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Saving the Florida torreya

    April 22, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Bristol, Florida — The Florida torreya was one of the world’s most endangered trees even before Hurricane Michael savaged the remaining wild specimens along the Apalachicola River with 100-plus mph winds in October 2018. It was also one of the most controversial trees, Exhibit A in a roiling debate over how, and where, to keep alive species facing extinction. More than 650,000 torreyas once lined the ridgelines or hugged the ravines near the Apalachicola and Flint rivers.  Learn more...

  • A bright green irrodescent fish in a small blue net.
    Information icon Barrens topminnows are small, colorful fish that live only in a few springs and creeks in central Tennessee. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed listing the fish as endangered. Photo by Emily Granstaff, USFWS.

    A boost in the Barrens

    February 27, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Barrens topminnows are small, colorful fish about four inches long, and the males are particularly showy during spawning season. Barrens darters are even smaller, and they are believed to be one of the rarest fish in North America. Cumberland pigtoes are mussels with mahogany shells and peach interiors. The fish and mussels are struggling to survive in the only place they live: the creeks and watersheds in a little part of Tennessee called the Barrens, midway between Nashville and Chattanooga.  Learn more...

  • West Tennessee refuges host first Wounded Warrior deer hunt

    December 13, 2018 | 1 minute read

    Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge in Brownsville, Tennessee, hosted 10 warriors for the refuge’s first annual Wounded Warrior hunt on Saturday, November 17. On hand to greet them were Tennessee State Senator Dolores Gresham, Brownsville Mayor Bill Rawls, and Haywood County Mayor David Livingston. Community sponsors, Insouth Bank of Brownsville and Brownsville Exchange Club, provided a dinner on Friday night and lunch on Saturday. Refuge employees put up 10 blinds and tree stands and assisted the hunters.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A small fish with brown and white spots swimming in front of small rocks.
    Information icon Trispot darter. Photo by Dick Biggins, USFWS.

    Final listing of the trispot darter, proposed 4(d) rule, proposed critical habitat

    January 30, 2019 | 12 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? Based on a review of the best available information and full status assessment, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is listing the trispot darter as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Service is also proposing a 4(d) rule and critical habitat. Check out the press release for this decision. What does it mean when a species is threatened?  Learn more...

News

  • A small, straw-yellow colored fish with brown markings
    Information icon Photo by Jeremy Shute, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Recovery plan available for endangered Cumberland darter

    June 5, 2019 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing the availability of the recovery plan for the Cumberland darter, a fish listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The darter is found in the upper Cumberland River drainage, above Cumberland Falls, in southeastern Kentucky and north central Tennessee. Its recovery plan describes actions necessary for its recovery, establishes criteria for delisting it, and estimates the time and cost for implementing necessary recovery actions.  Read the full story...

  • A small woodpecker perched on a pine tree.
    Information icon In 2018, there were 38 active clusters of endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers on this property in Alabama, thriving there under a Safe Harbor Agreement. Composite photo by Mark Bailey.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service honors Recovery Champions on Endangered Species Day

    May 16, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Endangered Species Day, May 17, 2019, is a day to celebrate efforts to recover 1,663 species on the list of federal endangered wildlife and plants protected under the Endangered Species Act.  Read the full story...

  • A bird of prey flying over a wetland.
    Information icon Everglades snail kite at Lake Kissimmee, Florida. Photo by South Florida Wetland Management District.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 36 Southeastern species

    April 11, 2019 | 6 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 36 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. They are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before June 10, 2019. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate, and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

  • A close-up shot of a small fish with a black line along it’s side and a bright red tip on it’s dorsal fin.
    Information icon Ashy darter. Photo by Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Thanks to conservation partnerships, two southeastern fish and a snail do not warrant Endangered Species Act protection

    April 3, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Following extensive scientific reviews, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that three southeastern animals do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future. Accordingly, the ashy darter, Barrens darter and Arkansas mudalia snail do not warrant Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection. For each animal, the Service brought together a team of biologists who compiled and examined all known data and research. Their peer-reviewed findings are outlined in species status assessments (SSAs), made available today.  Read the full story...

  • A small fish with brown and white spots swimming in front of small rocks.
    Information icon Trispot darter. Photo by Dick Biggins, USFWS.

    Unique fish gets endangered species protection with proposed exemptions and critical habitat

    January 30, 2019 | 6 minute read

    A small, colorful fish found in the Coosa River Basin is now federally protected. On January 29, 2018, the trispot darter was formally recognized as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is now proposing exemptions to otherwise prohibited activities under the ESA. The exemptions, included in a 4(d) rule, mark the ESA’s flexibility in allowing for certain management activities to continue because of their overall benefit to the long-term status of the listed darter.  Read the full story...

  • A small, blue and yellow fish floating above rocky substrate
    Information icon Tippecanoe darter. Photo © Robert Criswell, used with permission.

    Tiny freshwater fish does not warrant federal protection

    December 18, 2018 | 3 minute read

    After a thorough scientific review, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that populations of the Tippecanoe darter, a small freshwater fish, do not warrant federal protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). In some places, surveys suggest increasing populations, likely due to improvements in water quality. One of the smallest darters in the world, the Tippecanoe darter continues to be found across its historical range in larger streams and rivers of the Ohio River watershed in Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and West Virginia.  Read the full story...

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