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Tag: Tennessee purple coneflower

The content below has been tagged with the term “Tennessee purple coneflower.”

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  • A large grey bird flying in front of a bright blue sky.
    Brown pelican. Photo by Jon. D. Anderson CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    May 19th is Endangered Species Day

    May 19, 2017 | 4 minute read

    Endangered Species Day was created by a Senate resolution in 2006 to encourage “the people of the United States to become educated about, and aware of, threats to species, success stories in species recovery, and the opportunity to promote species conservation worldwide.” It has since been celebrated in more than a dozen other countries as well. Today, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is proud to celebrate this annual day, and to honor the recovery work being done under the Endangered Species Act, (ESA) which protects endangered and threatened species and the ecosystems upon which they depend, and helps them recover.  Read the full story...

  • A bumblebee feasting on flower nectar from a purple flower.
    Bumblebee on a purple coneflower. Photo by Brent Moore, CC BY-NC 2.0

    Conservation success: Tennessee purple coneflower delisted

    August 4, 2011 | 4 minute read

    Thanks to the efforts of many partners who have worked together for more than 30 years to expand and protect this sunflower’s colonies, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is removing the Tennessee purple coneflower from the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants in 30 days, by September 2, 2011. This plant is found in the limestone barrens and cedar glades of Davidson, Rutherford, and Wilson Counties.  Read the full story...

  • A bumblebee feasting on flower nectar from a purple flower.
    Bumblebee on a purple coneflower. Photo by Brent Moore, CC BY-NC 2.0

    Tennessee purple coneflower proposed for delisting

    August 12, 2010 | 5 minute read

    The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service today proposed removing the Tennessee purple coneflower from the list of threatened and endangered species, marking the success of a decades-long cooperative conservation effort under the Endangered Species Act. The rule was published in today’s Federal Register, and the public is invited to comment on the proposal for the next 60 days until October 12, 2010. “More than 30 years of protecting and expanding Tennessee purple coneflower colonies finally brought success to the Service and its conservation partners, ” said Cindy Dohner, the Service’s Southeast Regional Director.  Read the full story...

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