skip to content

Tag: Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office.”

Wildlife

  • A brown and black mussel with growth striations sitting on a rock.
    Information icon Close-up of endangered mussel from the Ohio River. Photo by Craig Stihler, USFWS.

    Pink mucket

    The Appalachian elktoe has a thin, kidney-shaped shell, extending to about 4 inches. Juveniles generally have a yellowish-brown periostracum (outer shell surface), while the periostracum of the adults is usually dark brown to greenish-black in color.  Visit the species profile...

  • The bright purple interior of two purple cat’s paw mussels on a leaf strewn bank
    Information icon Purple cat’s paw mussels. Photo by USFWS.

    Purple cat’s paw

    The Purple cat’s paw is one of the rarest freshwater mussels and was considered to be on the brink of extinction. It was listed as endangered in 1990 when some live adults were found but were too old to reproduce.  Visit the species profile...

  • A colorful trout in hand with a smiling angler in the background.
    Beautiful rainbow trout. Photo by Cale Bruckner, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Rainbow trout

    Rainbow trout are a North American game fish that get their name from the beautiful colors that shine on their skin. Coloration of the fish varies widely in relationship to sex, habitat, and maturity.  Visit the species profile...

  • A photograph of the outside and inside of a ring pink shell next to a ruler for scale.  Shell is approximately 3 inches wide.
    Information icon Ring pink. Photo by Leroy Koch, USFWS.

    Ring pink

    The orangefoot pimpleback is a mussel found in Alabama, Illinois, Kentucky and Tennessee rivers.  Visit the species profile...

  • A close up photo of a yellow mussel shell
    Information icon Adult rough pigtoe in the Green River in Kentucky. Photo by Monte McGregor, Center Mollusk Conservation, Kentucky DFWR.

    Rough pigtoe

    The rough pigtoe is a medium sized mussel, dark to yellowish brown in color, that is native to the Ohio River system. It is found in Alabama, Indiana, Kentucky and Virginia, with experimental populations in Tennessee, and is protected as an endangered species.  Visit the species profile...

  • A leafy green plant emerging from the leaf-littered forest floor.
    Information icon Small-whorled pogonia on the forest floor. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Small-whorled pogonia

    The small-whorled pogonia is a rare orchid listed as threatened on the endangered species list.  Visit the species profile...

  • A biologist repels down a cliff face to find an endangered plant.
    Information icon The National Park Service’s Matt Cooke measures a spreading avens plant. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Spreading avens

    Spreading avens, sometimes called Appalachian avens or cliff avens, is a rare perennial herb endemic to a few scattered mountaintops in western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee.  Visit the species profile...

  • Tiny brown spider with a white egg sac on a moist forest surface
    Information icon U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Susan Cameron visited Mount Craig in July, 2019 to search for the spider. Her effort was met with success as she logged the first known occurrence of the spider on the mountain. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Spruce-fir moss spider

    The spruce-fir moss spider is one of the smallest members of the primitive suborder of spiders, Mygalomorphae, which includes tarantulas and trapdoor spiders.  Visit the species profile...

  • Two tan colored mussels with dark striations eminating from their base on rocky substrate
    Information icon Tan riffleshells, male on the left; female on the right. Public domain photo by Dick Biggins.

    Tan riffleshell

    The tan riffleshell (Epioblasma florentina walkeri) is a medium sized freshwater mussel that has been listed under the threatened and endangered species list since 1977. It is a filter feeding mollusc found within isolated populations primarily in Virginia and Tennessee.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small fish with bright blue fins and orange coloring on its back.
    Information icon Trispot darter. Photo by Pat O'Neil, Geological Survey of Alabama.

    Trispot darter

    The trispot darter has three prominent black dorsal saddles, pale undersurface, and a dark bar below the eye. Scattered dark blotches exist on the fins rays.  Visit the species profile...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn