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Tag: Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office.”

Wildlife

  • A prehistoric looking fish with spines down its back and sides.
    Information icon Lake sturgeon. Photo by USFWS.

    Lake sturgeon

    Taxon: Freshwater Fish Range: Freshwater systems of North America from the Hudson Bay through the Mississippi River drainages Status: Not listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Lake sturgeon is listed as threatened at the state level in 19 of the 20 states it inhabits. Lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) is a temperate fish occurring in freshwater systems of North America from the Hudson Bay through the Mississippi River drainages.  Visit the species profile...

  • A brownish yellow mussel shell with white abrasions
    Information icon Photo by Monte McGregor, Center Mollusk Conservation, Kentucky DFWR.

    Littlewing pearlymussel

    The littlewing pearlymussel is a very small mussel found in cool-water streams in the Tennessee and Cumberland River basins in Alabama, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. It is protected as an endangered species.  Visit the species profile...

  • A brown mussel with orangish brown striations
    Information icon An orangefoot pimpleback mussel. Photo by Monte McGregor, Center Mollusk Conservation, Kentucky DFWR.

    Orangefoot pimpleback

    The orangefoot pimpleback is a mussel found in Alabama, Illinois, Kentucky and Tennessee rivers.  Visit the species profile...

  • A brown and black mussel with growth striations sitting on a rock.
    Information icon Close-up of endangered mussel from the Ohio River. Photo by Craig Stihler, USFWS.

    Pink mucket

    The Appalachian elktoe has a thin, kidney-shaped shell, extending to about 4 inches. Juveniles generally have a yellowish-brown periostracum (outer shell surface), while the periostracum of the adults is usually dark brown to greenish-black in color.  Visit the species profile...

  • The bright purple interior of two purple cat’s paw mussels on a leaf strewn bank
    Information icon Purple cat’s paw mussels. Photo by USFWS.

    Purple cat’s paw

    The Purple cat’s paw is one of the rarest freshwater mussels and was considered to be on the brink of extinction. It was listed as endangered in 1990 when some live adults were found but were too old to reproduce.  Visit the species profile...

  • A colorful trout in hand with a smiling angler in the background.
    Beautiful rainbow trout. Photo by Cale Bruckner, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Rainbow trout

    Rainbow trout are a North American game fish that get their name from the beautiful colors that shine on their skin. Coloration of the fish varies widely in relationship to sex, habitat, and maturity.  Visit the species profile...

  • A photograph of the outside and inside of a ring pink shell next to a ruler for scale.  Shell is approximately 3 inches wide.
    Information icon Ring pink. Photo by Leroy Koch, USFWS.

    Ring pink

    The orangefoot pimpleback is a mussel found in Alabama, Illinois, Kentucky and Tennessee rivers.  Visit the species profile...

  • A close up photo of a yellow mussel shell
    Information icon Adult rough pigtoe in the Green River in Kentucky. Photo by Monte McGregor, Center Mollusk Conservation, Kentucky DFWR.

    Rough pigtoe

    The rough pigtoe is a medium sized mussel, dark to yellowish brown in color, that is native to the Ohio River system. It is found in Alabama, Indiana, Kentucky and Virginia, with experimental populations in Tennessee, and is protected as an endangered species.  Visit the species profile...

  • A leafy green plant emerging from the leaf-littered forest floor.
    Information icon Small-whorled pogonia on the forest floor. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Small-whorled pogonia

    The small-whorled pogonia is a rare orchid listed as threatened on the endangered species list.  Visit the species profile...

  • A biologist repels down a cliff face to find an endangered plant.
    Information icon The National Park Service’s Matt Cooke measures a spreading avens plant. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Spreading avens

    Spreading avens, sometimes called Appalachian avens or cliff avens, is a rare perennial herb endemic to a few scattered mountaintops in western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee.  Visit the species profile...

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