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Tag: Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • Biologists turn to pottery company to help imperiled East Tennessee fish

    May 19, 2009 | 3 minute read

    Biologists working to conserve the chucky madtom, an imperiled catfish known to exist only in East Tennessee’s Little Chucky Creek, have turned to a novel idea to help the fish – flowerpot saucers. The saucers were converted into artificial housing for the chucky madtom, a small fish which lives on stream bottoms. Biologists peppered the bottom of Little Chucky Creek with the shelters, much like one would put out bluebird boxes or bat houses.  Learn more...

Podcasts

  • A small semi-transluscent catfish in an aquarium.
    Chucky madtom. Photo by J.R. Shute, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Efforts to help the chucky madtom fish

    August 7, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The chucky madtom is one of Southern Appalachia’s rarest fish, found only from a single stream in a single county in Eastern Tennessee. Only 14 specimens of the fish have ever been documented, the last sighting in 2004. This comes despite regular, and sometimes exhaustive, searches by biologists. Madtoms are small catfish, and the chucky madtom, like all madtoms, lives on the stream bottom, finding shelter beneath the rocks, logs, and other debris.  Learn more...

Wildlife

  • A mussel with fringe around its opening partially burried in the sand on the river bottom.
    Information icon Appalachian elktoe in the Little River Translyvania County NC. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Appalachian elktoe

    The Appalachian elktoe has a thin, kidney-shaped shell, extending to about 4 inches. Juveniles generally have a yellowish-brown periostracum (outer shell surface), while the periostracum of the adults is usually dark brown to greenish-black in color.  Visit the species profile...

  • A bright green irrodescent fish in a small blue net.
    Information icon Barrens topminnows are small, colorful fish that live only in a few springs and creeks in central Tennessee. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed listing the fish as endangered. Photo by Emily Granstaff, USFWS.

    Barrens topminnow

    The Barrens topminnow is a small colorful fish that grows to almost four inches long. It has an upturned mouth with a flattened head and back. Fins are rounded with the unpaired fins set far back on the body.  Visit the species profile...

  • A purple/rust colored salamander walking on rocky substrate
    Information icon Non metamorphosed Berry Cave salamander. Photo © Matthew Niemiller, used with permission.

    Berry Cave salamander

    The Berry Cave salamander is a member of the Tennessee cave salamander complex and has only been documented at 11 locations in four counties in eastern Tennessee: Knox, McMinn, Meigs, and Roane counties.  Visit the species profile...

  • A leafy green plant with yellow flowers like a dandilion emerge from a rock crevace.
    Information icon Blue Ridge goldenrod. Photo © Gregory Wilson.

    Blue Ridge goldenrod

    Blue Ridge goldenrod is a rare perennial herb with yellow flowers endemic to a limited area in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina and eastern Tennessee.  Visit the species profile...

  • A tiny turtle with orange patches on the side of its throat crawls through the grass
    A young bog turtle in an Appalachian bog. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Bog turtle (southern population)

    The bog turtle is the smallest turtle in North America. It’s orange to yellow patch on either side of the neck easily distinguishes it from other turtles.  Visit the species profile...

  • A colorful green/brown and red trout covered in small red spots.
    Information icon A wildlife biologist holds a small eastern brook trout. Photo by Steve Droter, Chesapeake Bay Program.

    Brook trout

    The brook trout is a fish native to the eastern United States, and is often referred to as speckled trout, spotted trout, brookie, and squaretail. “Brookies” are considered an indicator species, because they help indicate the health or overall quality of the waters they inhabit.  Visit the species profile...

  • Brown trout

    Taxon: Freshwater fish Range: Native to Europe; introduced to North America in 1883. Status: Not listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) Brown trout are a coldwater species like most fish of the salmon family. The first brown trout eggs were imported to the U.S. from Germany in 1883. In 1884, the release of 4,900 brown-trout fry into Michigan’s Baldwin River represented the first time the species swam free in U.  Visit the species profile...

  • A biologist holding a small squirrel with yellow gloves
    Information icon A Carolina northern flying squirrel in the hands of a biologist. Photo by Sue Cameron, USFWS.

    Carolina northern flying squirrel

    The Carolina northern flying squirrel is an American endangered species found in North Carolina, Virginia and Tennessee. It is typically found at high elevations in mixed red spruce-northern hardwood and spruce-fir forests.  Visit the species profile...

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