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Tag: Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • Enduring investments

    August 23, 2014 | 1 minute read

    During September and October of 2013, staff from the Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office enjoyed opportunities to assist botanists from the Tennessee Division of Natural Areas – Natural Heritage Program as they monitored populations of Virginia spiraea (Spiraea virginiana) in Tennessee. This species is found in the states of Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia on flood-scoured cobble and boulder bars and bedrock outcrops, shaped by streams draining the rugged terrain of Southern Appalachia.  Learn more...

  • Biologists turn to pottery company to help imperiled East Tennessee fish

    May 19, 2009 | 3 minute read

    Biologists working to conserve the chucky madtom, an imperiled catfish known to exist only in East Tennessee’s Little Chucky Creek, have turned to a novel idea to help the fish – flowerpot saucers. The saucers were converted into artificial housing for the chucky madtom, a small fish which lives on stream bottoms. Biologists peppered the bottom of Little Chucky Creek with the shelters, much like one would put out bluebird boxes or bat houses.  Learn more...

News

  • Three mussels in hand with identification numbers
    Winged mapleleaf mussels tagged for monitoring purposes can be found in the Saline river in Arkansas. Photo by Sarah Sorenson, USFWS.

    Fish and Wildlife Service announces $37.2 million in grants to boost state endangered species conservation efforts

    August 13, 2015 | 8 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced $37.2 million in grants to 20 states to support conservation planning and acquisition of vital habitat for threatened and endangered species across the nation. The grants, awarded through the Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund, will benefit numerous species, ranging from the Cahaba shiner to the red-cockaded woodpecker. Five southeasterm states received a combined total of $4,112,981 in grants - - Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, North Carolina, and Tennessee.  Read the full story...

  • A sloped, rocky stream in winter.
    Stream in Rhea, TN. Photo by Chris Morris CC BY 2.0.

    Draft recovery plan for endangered laurel dace available for review

    January 14, 2015 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is seeking public comment on the Technical/Agency Draft Recovery Plan for the laurel dace, a federally listed, endangered fish. Public comments will be accepted on this draft recovery plan until March 16, 2015. Listed as endangered in 2011, the laurel dace is a small fish native to the Tennessee River Basin in Tennessee. The dace is found in three creek systems on the Walden Ridge of the Cumberland Plateau in Bledsoe, Rhea, and Sequatchie Counties.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • A small semi-transluscent catfish in an aquarium.
    Chucky madtom. Photo by J.R. Shute, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Efforts to help the chucky madtom fish

    August 7, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The chucky madtom is one of Southern Appalachia’s rarest fish, found only from a single stream in a single county in Eastern Tennessee. Only 14 specimens of the fish have ever been documented, the last sighting in 2004. This comes despite regular, and sometimes exhaustive, searches by biologists. Madtoms are small catfish, and the chucky madtom, like all madtoms, lives on the stream bottom, finding shelter beneath the rocks, logs, and other debris.  Learn more...

Wildlife

  • A mussel with fringe around its opening partially burried in the sand on the river bottom.
    Information icon Appalachian elktoe in the Little River Translyvania County NC. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Appalachian elktoe

    The Appalachian elktoe has a thin, kidney-shaped shell, extending to about 4 inches. Juveniles generally have a yellowish-brown periostracum (outer shell surface), while the periostracum of the adults is usually dark brown to greenish-black in color.  Visit the species profile...

  • A bright green irrodescent fish in a small blue net.
    Information icon Barrens topminnows are small, colorful fish that live only in a few springs and creeks in central Tennessee. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed listing the fish as endangered. Photo by Emily Granstaff, USFWS.

    Barrens topminnow

    The Barrens topminnow is a small colorful fish that grows to almost four inches long. It has an upturned mouth with a flattened head and back. Fins are rounded with the unpaired fins set far back on the body.  Visit the species profile...

  • A purple/rust colored salamander walking on rocky substrate
    Information icon Non metamorphosed Berry Cave salamander. Photo © Matthew Niemiller, used with permission.

    Berry Cave salamander

    The Berry Cave salamander is a member of the Tennessee cave salamander complex and has only been documented at 11 locations in four counties in eastern Tennessee: Knox, McMinn, Meigs, and Roane counties.  Visit the species profile...

  • A leafy green plant with yellow flowers like a dandilion emerge from a rock crevace.
    Information icon Blue Ridge goldenrod. Photo © Gregory Wilson.

    Blue Ridge goldenrod

    Blue Ridge goldenrod is a rare perennial herb with yellow flowers endemic to a limited area in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina and eastern Tennessee.  Visit the species profile...

  • A tiny turtle with orange patches on the side of its throat crawls through the grass
    A young bog turtle in an Appalachian bog. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Bog turtle (southern population)

    The bog turtle is the smallest turtle in North America. It’s orange to yellow patch on either side of the neck easily distinguishes it from other turtles.  Visit the species profile...

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