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Tag: Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • A man wearing an orange Tennessee NWR shirt releases a brownish grey bird, which takes flight.

    Banded together

    September 4, 2018 | 8 minute readNew Johnsonville, Tennessee — They gathered in a large group, more than 100. They didn’t know it yet, but they were about to help science. That began when Clayton Ferrell into their midst and selected one Aix sponsa ­– a wood duck. He held her with his left hand. His right grasped a set of needle-nose pliers. Something flashed in the sun — a small piece of aluminum, slightly curved, with a number engraved on it. Learn more...

    A wood duck heads skyward after banding as Bill Ross watches. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

  • A woman wearing a warm hat preparing to plant a tiny spruce tree seedling.

    Women lead the effort on Appalachian mountain-top forests

    May 24, 2018 | 8 minute readThe story of an ambitious effort to restore red spruce to the Southern Appalachians spearheaded by four women brought together by a commitment to the highest peaks east of the Mississippi River. Learn more...

    Sue Cameron plants a red spruce at Whigg Meadow in Tennessee. Photo by Garry Peeples, USFWS.

Faq

  • A small black bird flies over a lush green marsh

    Proposed listing for the eastern black rail

    October 5, 2018 | 12 minute readWhat action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to protect the eastern black rail, a small secretive marsh bird native to the United States, as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Partially migratory, the eastern black rail is known in as many as 36 states, plus multiple territories and countries in the Caribbean and Central and South America. It is one of four subspecies of black rail, which live in salt, brackish, and freshwater marshes. Learn more...

    Eastern black rail in flight – Texas, April 2016. Photo © Jesse Huth, used with permission, Huth Avian Services.

  • A bright green irrodescent fish in a small blue net.

    Proposed listing of the Barrens topminnow

    January 3, 2018 | 7 minute readWhat action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? We are proposing to list the Barrens topminnow as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). What does it mean when a species is listed as endangered? A species is listed in one of two categories: endangered or threatened. An endangered species is one that is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range. Learn more...

    Barrens topminnow. Photo by Emily Granstaff, USFWS.

News

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.

    Service proposes to list the eastern black rail as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    October 5, 2018 | 5 minute readThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners are working to protect a small, secretive marsh bird that is in steep decline. Some populations of the eastern black rail along the Atlantic coast have dropped by as much as 90 percent, and with a relatively small total population remaining across the eastern United States, the Service is proposing to list the subspecies as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Read the full story...

    Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

  • A small semi-transluscent catfish in an aquarium.

    Recovery plan for endangered Chucky madtom available

    September 19, 2018 | 3 minute readThe final recovery plan for the Chucky madtom, a federally listed endangered small catfish, is now available. The Chucky madtom lives in a single tributary of the Nolichucky River in East Tennessee. Threats to the species include loss of habitat, small population size, inability to offset mortality with natural reproduction, and their resulting vulnerability to natural or human-induced catastrophic events, such as droughts and pollution. This plan describes actions considered necessary for the recovery of this fish, establishes criteria for delisting the species, and estimates the time and cost for implementing the measures needed. Read the full story...

    Chucky madtom. Photo by J.R. Shute, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

  • A low growing shrub with bright purple flowers.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 35 Southeastern species

    May 7, 2018 | 5 minute readAs part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 35 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before July 6, 2018. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis. Read the full story...

    Endangered Pyne’s ground-plum. Photo by NPS.

  • A small, straw-yellow colored fish with brown markings

    Cumberland darter draft recovery plan available for review

    April 2, 2018 | 3 minute readThe Cumberland darter is a pencil-sized fish that lives in the Upper Cumberland River Basin in Kentucky and Tennessee. It is endangered and protected under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is releasing a draft recovery plan for the fish. The public is invited to submit comments concerning the draft recovery plan through June 4, 2018. The Cumberland darter lives in pools and shallow runs of streams with sand-covered river bottoms in that basin. Read the full story...

    Photo by Jeremy Shute, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

  • A bright green irrodescent fish in a small blue net.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes endangered status for Barrens topminnow

    January 3, 2018 | 4 minute readThe Barrens Plateau is home to a beautiful, iridescent fish that rarely grows longer than four inches and is found in only a few creeks and springs in four Tennessee counties. That little fish is now in trouble, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to help protect it as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Barrens topminnow has suffered from introduction of the non-native western mosquitofish, which has invaded the minnow’s habitat, outcompeting it for food and directly preying on young topminnows. Read the full story...

    Barrens topminnow. Photo by Emily Granstaff, USFWS.

  • A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.

    Bat, snail, and popular plant may need endangered species protection

    December 19, 2017 | 5 minute readMore research is needed on three species before U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials can determine whether to add them to the threatened and endangered species list. More scientific and commercial information will be compiled for the Venus flytrap, located in the Carolinas; oblong rocksnail, located in Alabama; and tricolored bat, located in 38 states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. The Service and its partners will continue to research the species’ life history, biological requirements and habitats to develop a Species Status Assessment (SSA) and 12-month finding. Read the full story...

    Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

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