skip to content

Tag: Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • Tiny fish swim out of a plastic bag aand into a stream
    Information icon Barrens topminnows being released into Short Springs. Photo, Erin Johnson, USFWS.

    Barrens topminnows released into Short Springs

    August 22, 2019 | 1 minute read

    This spring, 67 Barrens topminnows were released into Short Springs located near Tullahoma, Tennessee. These Barrens topminnows were spawned at Conservation Fisheries Inc. (CFI). The Tennessee Aquarium and CFI provide Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery with the topminnows when they reach about 10-12 millimeters in length for grow-out. Cultured fish are released at about 25 millimeters, and Wolf Creek typically makes one or two releases during the year. The program is coordinated with the Cookeville, Tennessee, Ecological Services Field Office.  Learn more...

  • A brown, furry bat attached to the roof of a humid cave
    Information icon A tri-colored bat Fern Cave National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Michael Senn, USFWS.

    To the bat cave!

    July 25, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Paint Rock, Alabama — Nothing really distinguishes Nat Mountain from its hilly neighbors amid the southern foothills of the Appalachian Mountains. It’s not particularly tall at 1,600 feet. It offers no sweeping summertime views, except snatches of distant mountains and the curvaceous Paint Rock River. It’s home to the Fern Cave National Wildlife Refuge, but, on the surface, there’s really nothing to do here. It’s what’s below ground that tantalizes.  Learn more...

Faq

  • Tiny fish swim out of a plastic bag aand into a stream
    Information icon Barrens topminnows being released into Short Springs. Photo, Erin Johnson, USFWS.

    Final listing of Barrens topminnow as endangered under Endangered Species Act

    October 18, 2019 | 3 minute read

    What is the Barrens topminnow? The Barrens topminnow is a small, colorful fish that reaches up to four inches in length native only to Tennessee. Barrens topminnows have upturned mouths, flattened heads and backs, and rounded fins with dorsal and anal fins set far back on the body. Males are very showy during the spawning season, with bodies displaying bright, iridescent background colors of greens, blues and reddish orange spots, and their fins colored yellow.  Learn more...

News

  • Two black and white birds on the edge of a body of water.
    Information icon Interior least tern. Photo by USFWS.

    Recovery of America’s smallest tern prompts proposal to delist

    October 23, 2019 | 5 minute read

    When the interior least tern was listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1985, there were fewer than 2,000 birds and only a few dozen nesting sites scattered across a once-expansive range that covered America’s Great Plains and Lower Mississippi Valley. Today there are more than 18,000 interior least terns at more than 480 nesting sites in 18 states, thanks to decades of innovative conservation efforts and diverse partnerships among local, state and federal stakeholders.  Read the full story...

  • A bright green irrodescent fish in a small blue net.
    Information icon Barrens topminnows are small, colorful fish that live only in a few springs and creeks in central Tennessee. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed listing the fish as endangered. Photo by Emily Granstaff, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service finalizes rule to protect fish unique to Tennessee under Endangered Species Act

    October 18, 2019 | 2 minute read

    The Barrens topminnow, a beautiful, iridescent fish found only in four Tennessee counties, was listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act today. The final listing follows a rigorous review of the best available science and information that determined it is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range. The topminnow was once found at 18 sites on Tennessee’s Barrens Plateau, but recent surveys indicate it is down to just five sites.  Read the full story...

  • A black, grey and yellow snake with a rounded head.
    Information icon Southern hognose snake. Photo by Pierson Hill, FWC.

    Service determines six Southeastern species do not warrant Endangered Species Act protections

    October 7, 2019 | 6 minute read

    Based on reviews of the best available science, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has found that the Florida clamshell orchid, Ocala vetch, yellow anisetree, redlips darter, Berry Cave salamander and southern hognose snake do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future. Protection of these species on existing conservation lands and new survey data helped inform the reviews, and as such, the Service determined that none of the species warrant protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Read the full story...

  • A light brown snake with darker black and brown markings on a green vine.
    Puerto Rican boa. Photo by Jan Paul Zegarra.

    Service announces recovery plan revisions for 43 species, to assist in measuring progress and addressing threats

    August 5, 2019 | 5 minute read

    As part of an agency-wide effort to advance the recovery of our nation’s most imperiled species, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has made publicly available draft revisions for 21 recovery plans that provide a recovery roadmap for 43 federally protected species. This batch of recovery plan revisions is part of the Department of the Interior’s Agency Priority Performance Goals. The effort calls for all recovery plans to include quantitative criteria on what constitutes recovery by September 2019.  Read the full story...

  • A long stemmed plant with bright yellow flowers.
    Information icon Shorts bladderpod. Photo by John MacGregor, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.

    Draft recovery plan for Short’s bladderpod available

    July 16, 2019 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is releasing a draft recovery plan for the Short’s bladderpod, a bright yellow flowering plant in the mustard family. The plant, which stands about two feet tall, is only found in Indiana, Kentucky, and Tennessee. It exists near rivers on steep and rocky wooded slopes. Federally listed as endangered on August 1, 2014, the plant is state-listed in each of the three states where it exists.  Read the full story...

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Information icon Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 53 Southeastern species

    June 20, 2019 | 9 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 53 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before August, 19, 2019. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

  • A small, straw-yellow colored fish with brown markings
    Information icon Photo by Jeremy Shute, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Recovery plan available for endangered Cumberland darter

    June 5, 2019 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing the availability of the recovery plan for the Cumberland darter, a fish listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The darter is found in the upper Cumberland River drainage, above Cumberland Falls, in southeastern Kentucky and north central Tennessee. Its recovery plan describes actions necessary for its recovery, establishes criteria for delisting it, and estimates the time and cost for implementing necessary recovery actions.  Read the full story...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn