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Tag: Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Tennessee Ecological Services Field Office.”

Faq

  • Two small white birds with yellow beaks and black marking on head on the beach
    Information icon Interior least terns. Photo by USFWS

    Removal of interior least tern from the list of endangered and threatened wildlife - Questions and answers

    January 11, 2021 | 6 minute read

    What is an interior least tern? Least terns are the smallest members of the tern family. Terns are generally considered seabirds, but several species are also found along rivers, lakes, or other wetlands. The interior least tern is a migratory bird species, nesting along freshwater habitats of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers and their major tributaries and overwintering in the Caribbean and South America. Least terns feed primarily on small fish.  Learn more...

  • A blackish/navy blue bird with bright red eyes and white markings on its wings
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo by Christy Hand, SCDNR.

    Eastern black rail - final 4(d) rule

    October 7, 2020 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), has broad authority to issue regulations for the conservation of threatened species. The ESA provides a specific list of prohibitions for endangered species under section 9, but does not automatically provide these same prohibitions to threatened species. Section 4(d) of the ESA allows the Service to establish prohibitions or exceptions to prohibitions for threatened species. The intent of any 4(d) rule is to provide for the conservation of a threatened species by allowing regulatory flexibility under the ESA.  Learn more...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Eastern black rail final listing as a threatened species

    October 7, 2020 | 14 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is finalizing a rule to protect the eastern black rail, a small secretive marsh bird native to the United States, as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Partially migratory, the eastern black rail is historically known to exist in 35 states east of the Rocky Mountains, Puerto Rico, Canada, Brazil and several countries in the Caribbean and Central America.  Learn more...

  • Two outstretched hands holding a light red colored crayfish by the claws
    Information icon Nashville crayfish. Photo by Phil Kloer, USFWS.

    Reopening public comment period for the proposed delisting of Nashville crayfish

    September 22, 2020 | 5 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? In November 2019, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), published a proposed rule to remove the Nashville crayfish from the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife, and announced a 60-day public comment period on the proposed rule, which ended January 27, 2020. The Service is now reopening the public comment period on the proposed rule for an additional 30 days, to allow all interested parties additional time to comment on the proposed rule.  Learn more...

  • Two outstretched hands holding a light red colored crayfish by the claws
    Information icon Nashville crayfish. Photo by Phil Kloer, USFWS.

    Proposed delisting of Nashville crayfish

    November 25, 2019 | 4 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to delist the Nashville crayfish. This determination is based on the best available scientific and commercial data, which indicate that the threats to the species have been eliminated or reduced to the point that the species has recovered and no longer meets the definition of an endangered or a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Learn more...

News

  • Two small white birds with yellow beaks and black marking on head on the beach
    Information icon Interior least terns. Photo by USFWS

    Trump Administration celebrates recovery of America’s smallest tern

    January 11, 2021 | 6 minute read

    After more than three decades of conservation partnerships inspired by the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is celebrating the delisting of the interior least tern due to recovery. According to the best available science, the diverse efforts of local, state and federal stakeholders across the interior least tern’s 18-state range have helped ensure populations are healthy, stable and increasing into the foreseeable future. The tern will continue to be protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.  Read the full story...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Service finalizes listing the eastern black rail as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    October 7, 2020 | 4 minute read

    The eastern black rail, a small, secretive marsh bird historically known to exist in 35 states east of the Rocky Mountains, Puerto Rico, Canada, Brazil, and several countries in the Caribbean and Central America, will be listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The final listing includes a rule that will help ensure beneficial conservation actions continue, while minimizing impacts to landowners and other stakeholders. Critical habitat designation for the eastern black rail was deemed not prudent.  Read the full story...

  • Two outstretched hands holding a light red colored crayfish by the claws
    Information icon Nashville crayfish. Photo by Phil Kloer, USFWS.

    Service reopens public comment period for proposed delisting of Nashville crayfish

    September 22, 2020 | 4 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is reopening the public comment period on the proposed delisting of the Nashville crayfish from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) due to recovery. The comment period reopening will provide an additional 30 days for all interested parties to comment on the proposed rule and participate in an information meeting and a separate public hearing. Comments previously submitted need not be resubmitted and will be fully considered in preparation of the final rule.  Read the full story...

  • Two outstretched hands holding a light red colored crayfish by the claws
    Information icon Nashville crayfish. Photo by Phil Kloer, USFWS.

    Nashville crayfish proposed delisting is a hometown success story

    November 25, 2019 | 3 minute read

    The Nashville crayfish lives in only one place in the world: the Mill Creek watershed in metropolitan Nashville. Despite the urban setting, the crayfish is doing just fine. So much so that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to delist it under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), following a science-based status review. The review found that populations are healthy, stable and robust and that it no longer meets the definition of an endangered or a threatened species under the ESA.  Read the full story...

  • Two black and white birds on the edge of a body of water.
    Information icon Interior least tern. Photo by USFWS.

    Recovery of America’s smallest tern prompts proposal to delist

    October 23, 2019 | 5 minute read

    When the interior least tern was listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1985, there were fewer than 2,000 birds and only a few dozen nesting sites scattered across a once-expansive range that covered America’s Great Plains and Lower Mississippi Valley. Today there are more than 18,000 interior least terns at more than 480 nesting sites in 18 states, thanks to decades of innovative conservation efforts and diverse partnerships among local, state and federal stakeholders.  Read the full story...

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