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Tag: Stream Barrier

The content below has been tagged with the term “Stream Barrier.”

Articles

  • $425,000 in recovery funding to help restore wildlife habitat on Western North Carolina private lands

    November 10, 2009 | 3 minute read

    As part of the federal economic stimulus effort, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has awarded $425,000 in grants to three western North Carolina non-profits to help restore wildlife habitat on private lands. The Little Tennessee Watershed Association, Carolina Mountain Land Conservancy, and the Blue Ridge Resource Conservation and Development Council will use the funds for stream and wetland restoration projects on private lands in three of the Service’s priority areas: the Little Tennessee River watershed, the Upper French Broad River watershed, and the Upper Nolichucky River watershed — each home to federally endangered species.  Learn more...

  • Biologists work to clear the way for fish and other aquatic life

    November 28, 2007 | 3 minute read

    In an effort to help recover North Carolina’s only population of the spotfin chub, a threatened fish, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is leading a project to help open up new habitat for the fish in the Little Tennessee River basin. The spotfin chub was once thought to inhabit only the main stem of the Little Tennessee River, however a mass migration was documented in 1999, two miles up one of the river’s tributaries.  Learn more...

Conservation-Tools

  • A screencapture showing locations of barrier removals across the country.
    Information icon Each fish icon on the GeoFIN mapper represents a barrier removed from a stream across the country.

    Geospatial Fisheries Information Network (GeoFIN)

    The GeoFIN mapper is an interactive mapping tool that allows you to view barriers to fish passage across the U.S. as well as model their removal in your watershed. It also generates profiles and reports for a given geographic area and can search the USFWS fish passage barrier database.  Learn more...

News

Podcasts

  • A hand holds a tiny turtle with orange markings on either side of its neck.
    Young bog turtle in hand. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Stimulus money goes to help Appalachian wildlife

    February 2, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Money from the federal government’s stimulus package is coming to help wildlife in the Southern Appalachians. $425,000 in grants from the Fish and Wildlife Service will go to local non-profits to improve fish and wildlife habitat on private lands in western North Carolina. The Little Tennessee Watershed Association will receive $75,000 to restore aquatic organism passage along tributaries of the Little Tennessee River in Macon and Swain Counties.  Learn more...

  • A biologist holds a silver/white fish next to a large ruler for measurement
    American shad. Photo by FWC

    Santee-Cooper Accord helps move migratory fish across the Carolinas

    January 9, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The Santee River basin begins in Western North Carolina, where the headwaters of the Catawba, Broad, and Pacolet Rivers trickle down from the Eastern Continental divide. The basin includes the Congaree, Saluda, Wateree and a host of other rivers, eventually all joining to form the Santee River which empties into the ocean north of Charleston. It’s a basin whose rivers are punctuated by dams that provide electricity to Charlotte, Greenville and Columbia.  Learn more...

  • Dam removal in the Toe River Valley

    October 19, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week, we’re going to look at steps being taken to help restore the health of a pair of Western North Carolina rivers. The North Toe River flows through the town of Spruce Pine, in North Carolina’s Mitchell County. In town, the river is bordered by riverside park – a city park, with picnic tables and swings, where one can sit and enjoy the river flowing by.  Learn more...

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