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Tag: St Vincent National Wildlife Refuge

The content below has been tagged with the term “St Vincent National Wildlife Refuge.”

Articles

  • A white sign that reads "Monarch Butterfly Festival, October 27th, St. Marks NWR, 850-925-6121"

    It’s monarch time

    October 24, 2018 | 5 minute readSt. Marks, Florida — And now for a small bit of good news in a part of the country where a hurricane has made nearly every tale bad: The Monarch Butterfly Festival will take place as planned. Walk, drive and — yes — fly to the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge to celebrate that colorful flutterer, Danaus plexippus. The festival is Oct. 27 at a refuge where Hurricane Michael came calling earlier this month. Learn more...

    The festival takes place Oct. 27 at the refuge, located on Apalachee Bay on the Florida Panhandle. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

  • A brown sign bent in half by high winds that reads St Vincent NWR

    Survivors of the storm

    October 22, 2018 | 6 minute readBradley Smith seeks evidence that the red wolves survived Hurricane Michael off St. Vincent NWR. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS. Apalachicola, Florida — Bradley Smith stood tall on the bow of the SeaArk 21-footer with a VHF antenna held high. It was quiet, too quiet. It had been six days since Hurricane Michael devastated the Panhandle and Smith was listening for signs of life on St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge. Learn more...

    The sand-clogged dock with St. Vincent NWR in the background. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

  • A drum-shapped buoy washed ashore with plam trees and a lighthouse in the distance

    Service makes headway in Hurricane Michael repairs

    October 17, 2018 | 5 minute readSt. Marks, Florida — The images of Hurricane Michael’s rampage across the Panhandle have been seared, by now, into the nation’s collective consciousness: the roofless homes; the mountains of debris; the long lines of anguished people; and the miles of chopped-in-half trees. The worst of the damage came courtesy of winds nearing 155 mph. Michael’s counter-clockwise punch, though, pushed water from the Gulf of Mexico deep inland, swamping small towns, barrier islands and wildlife refuges, particularly along Michael’s eastern edge. Learn more...

    A buoy washed ashore by Hurricane Michael at St. Marks NWR.

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