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Tag: St Marks National Wildlife Refuge

The content below has been tagged with the term “St Marks National Wildlife Refuge.”

Articles

  • Two large white birds flying low over a wetland coming in for a landing with a Service biologist in the foreground

    “Journey of the Whooping Crane” follows efforts to save a rare, endangered bird

    November 30, 2018 | 2 minute readIn 1940, only about 20 whooping cranes were known to exist. Today, thanks to the diligence of many partners working together in the United States and Canada, there are more than 850 cranes in North America and the population continues to increase slowly and steadily. The iconic bird is one of the success stories of the Endangered Species Act (ESA). But it remains one of the rarest animals in the world. Learn more...

    Two endangered whooping cranes coming in for a landing. Photo by Greg Pope.

  • Biologist assess damage to a forest after a hurricane

    Test flight for red-cockaded woodpeckers

    November 21, 2018 | 3 minute readJoshua Havird lifted his quadcopter drone from its case as if he was handling a carton of eggs. The assistant fire management officer from St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge was on hand at the neighboring Apalachicola National Forest in the wake of Hurricane Michael. The Apalachicola, the only national forest on Florida’s panhandle and about 20 miles to the east of Mexico Beach, was hit hard on its western flank. Learn more...

    Joshua Havird (blue shirt) and Joel Casto (plaid shirt) assess RCW clusters. Photo by Michael Keys, USFS.

  • A white sign that reads "Monarch Butterfly Festival, October 27th, St. Marks NWR, 850-925-6121"

    It’s monarch time

    October 24, 2018 | 5 minute readSt. Marks, Florida — And now for a small bit of good news in a part of the country where a hurricane has made nearly every tale bad: The Monarch Butterfly Festival will take place as planned. Walk, drive and — yes — fly to the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge to celebrate that colorful flutterer, Danaus plexippus. The festival is Oct. 27 at a refuge where Hurricane Michael came calling earlier this month. Learn more...

    The festival takes place Oct. 27 at the refuge, located on Apalachee Bay on the Florida Panhandle. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

  • A brown sign bent in half by high winds that reads St Vincent NWR

    Survivors of the storm

    October 22, 2018 | 6 minute readBradley Smith seeks evidence that the red wolves survived Hurricane Michael off St. Vincent NWR. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS. Apalachicola, Florida — Bradley Smith stood tall on the bow of the SeaArk 21-footer with a VHF antenna held high. It was quiet, too quiet. It had been six days since Hurricane Michael devastated the Panhandle and Smith was listening for signs of life on St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge. Learn more...

    The sand-clogged dock with St. Vincent NWR in the background. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

  • A drum-shapped buoy washed ashore with plam trees and a lighthouse in the distance

    Service makes headway in Hurricane Michael repairs

    October 17, 2018 | 5 minute readSt. Marks, Florida — The images of Hurricane Michael’s rampage across the Panhandle have been seared, by now, into the nation’s collective consciousness: the roofless homes; the mountains of debris; the long lines of anguished people; and the miles of chopped-in-half trees. The worst of the damage came courtesy of winds nearing 155 mph. Michael’s counter-clockwise punch, though, pushed water from the Gulf of Mexico deep inland, swamping small towns, barrier islands and wildlife refuges, particularly along Michael’s eastern edge. Learn more...

    A buoy washed ashore by Hurricane Michael at St. Marks NWR.

  • A shining example

    June 4, 2018 | 7 minute readAtlanta, Georgia — Sam Shine, for years, quietly bought up North Florida property and set about conserving it. A successful Midwestern manufacturer, Shine made a number of under-the-radar land deals that received little notice outside the Panhandle conservation community. Until now. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service just received 6,200 acres of ecologically critical pine lands and headwaters adjoining the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Shine is donating the land to the Service — a gift — not merely selling of a chunk at a good price or establishing a conservation easement. Learn more...

  • A man in protective gear uses a chainsaw to cut a fallen tree.

    ‘Lots of new help here,’ as recovery picks up and residents begin returning

    September 16, 2017 | 5 minute readBig Pine Key, Florida – Hurricane Irma hammered the Florida Keys a week ago Sunday and the recovery has been a whirl of progress and promise. Learn more...

    Fallen tree at National Key Deer Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

Podcasts

  • Two bright white birds with red patches on their face and long slender legs standing in the a dormant grassy field.

    Whooping cranes headed south

    January 3, 2011 | 2 minute readTranscript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Ten of the world’s most endangered birds recently flew across the Southern Appalachians, led by a trio of ultra-light aircraft. The birds were the 10th group of whooping cranes to be escorted from Wisconsin in an ongoing effort to establish a new flock of migrating whooping cranes. For years all of the migrating wild cranes were part of a flock that flew between Wisconsin and Texas, however several years ago a project came together to establish an eastern flock of the cranes, flying between Wisconsin and Florida. Learn more...

    Whooping cranes. Photo by D. Serverson, USFWS.

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