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Tag: St Marks National Wildlife Refuge

The content below has been tagged with the term “St Marks National Wildlife Refuge.”

Articles

  • An island with tree snags and shrubs covered in snowy egrits and brown pelicans
    Information icon Snowy egrits and brown pelicans on Smith Island. Photo by Joe Reinman, USFWS.

    Bird rookery now protected as part of St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge

    August 20, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Shell Point, Florida — St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge celebrated the acquisition of Smith Island by the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge at the refuge’s pavilion overlooking beautiful Apalachee Bay. It was an auspicious day, with pelicans sailing in front of participants as if to add their approval of the event. This small island, 20 acres or so, is about 90 percent saltmarsh, with the remainder containing a handful of small trees and bushes.  Learn more...

  • A bright white lighthouse surrounded by oak and palm trees.
    Information icon The restored lighthouse at St. Mark's NWR. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Beacon at the refuge

    June 27, 2019 | 6 minute read

    St. Marks, Florida — The lighthouse was abandoned, battered by hurricanes and infested with rats. Termites feasted on plywood floors. Rainwater seeped into the cupola and ran down interior walls. Wooden steps, inside and out, rotted away. The lighthouse at St. Marks NWR. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS. The U.S. Coast Guard relinquished control of the lighthouse and keeper’s quarters to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 2013.  Learn more...

  • A bright pink bird with large wings with black feathers flying across a blue sky
    Information icon Pinky The Flamingo turned up at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge in Florida after Hurricane Michael. Photo © Karen Willes, Friends of St. Marks Wildlife Refuge.

    Pinky in paradise

    May 2, 2019 | 4 minute read

    St. Marks, Florida — Hurricane Michael careened through the Gulf of Mexico last fall sucking up all manner of flotsam and jetsam before scattering the unwelcome mess across the Panhandle. Yet there was one airborne interloper that was embraced heartily by the storm-tossed masses below. Pinky The Flamingo.  Learn more...

  • Two large white birds flying low over a wetland coming in for a landing with a Service biologist in the foreground
    Information icon Two endangered whooping cranes coming in for a landing. Photo by Greg Pope.

    “Journey of the Whooping Crane” follows efforts to save a rare, endangered bird

    November 30, 2018 | 2 minute read

    In 1940, only about 20 whooping cranes were known to exist. Today, thanks to the diligence of many partners working together in the United States and Canada, there are more than 850 cranes in North America and the population continues to increase slowly and steadily. The iconic bird is one of the success stories of the Endangered Species Act (ESA). But it remains one of the rarest animals in the world.  Learn more...

  • Biologist assess damage to a forest after a hurricane
    Information icon Joshua Havird (blue shirt) and Joel Casto (plaid shirt) assess RCW clusters. Photo by Michael Keys, USFS.

    Test flight for red-cockaded woodpeckers

    November 21, 2018 | 3 minute read

    Joshua Havird lifted his quadcopter drone from its case as if he was handling a carton of eggs. The assistant fire management officer from St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge was on hand at the neighboring Apalachicola National Forest in the wake of Hurricane Michael. The Apalachicola, the only national forest on Florida’s panhandle and about 20 miles to the east of Mexico Beach, was hit hard on its western flank.  Learn more...

  • A white sign that reads "Monarch Butterfly Festival, October 27th, St. Marks NWR, 850-925-6121"
    Information icon The festival takes place Oct. 27 at the refuge, located on Apalachee Bay on the Florida Panhandle. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

    It’s monarch time

    October 24, 2018 | 5 minute read

    St. Marks, Florida — And now for a small bit of good news in a part of the country where a hurricane has made nearly every tale bad: The Monarch Butterfly Festival will take place as planned. Walk, drive and — yes — fly to the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge to celebrate that colorful flutterer, Danaus plexippus. The festival is Oct. 27 at a refuge where Hurricane Michael came calling earlier this month.  Learn more...

  • A brown sign bent in half by high winds that reads St Vincent NWR
    Information icon The sand-clogged dock with St. Vincent NWR in the background. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Survivors of the storm

    October 22, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Bradley Smith seeks evidence that the red wolves survived Hurricane Michael off St. Vincent NWR. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS. Apalachicola, Florida — Bradley Smith stood tall on the bow of the SeaArk 21-footer with a VHF antenna held high. It was quiet, too quiet. It had been six days since Hurricane Michael devastated the Panhandle and Smith was listening for signs of life on St.  Learn more...

  • A drum-shapped buoy washed ashore with plam trees and a lighthouse in the distance
    Information icon A buoy washed ashore by Hurricane Michael at St. Marks NWR.

    Service makes headway in Hurricane Michael repairs

    October 17, 2018 | 5 minute read

    St. Marks, Florida — The images of Hurricane Michael’s rampage across the Panhandle have been seared, by now, into the nation’s collective consciousness: the roofless homes; the mountains of debris; the long lines of anguished people; and the miles of chopped-in-half trees. The worst of the damage came courtesy of winds nearing 155 mph. Michael’s counter-clockwise punch, though, pushed water from the Gulf of Mexico deep inland, swamping small towns, barrier islands and wildlife refuges, particularly along Michael’s eastern edge.  Learn more...

  • A shining example

    June 4, 2018 | 7 minute read

    Atlanta, Georgia — Sam Shine, for years, quietly bought up North Florida property and set about conserving it. A successful Midwestern manufacturer, Shine made a number of under-the-radar land deals that received little notice outside the Panhandle conservation community. Until now. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service just received 6,200 acres of ecologically critical pine lands and headwaters adjoining the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Shine is donating the land to the Service — a gift — not merely selling of a chunk at a good price or establishing a conservation easement.  Learn more...

  • A visitor looks intently at an iPhone screen attached to a large photographic scope.
    Information icon Shutterbugs photography course in action on St. Marks NWR. Photo courtesy of Karen Willes, USFWS Volunteer.

    Shutterbugs at St. Marks

    February 28, 2018 | 3 minute read

    When St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge on the Florida panhandle was awarded a $5,000 grant to encourage mobile photography on the refuge, staff originally planned to offer a class to children with an accompanying adult. However, few adults with children signed up for the first class. In addition, adults told refuge staff members that they would like to sign up but didn’t have a child to bring with them. After the refuge opened the classes to adults, more than 100 participants enrolled in the three-hour classes that have been offered in the last two years.  Learn more...

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