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Tag: Spruce-Fir Moss Spider

The content below has been tagged with the term “Spruce-Fir Moss Spider.”

Articles

  • A woman wearing a warm hat preparing to plant a tiny spruce tree seedling.
    Information icon Sue Cameron plants a red spruce at Whigg Meadow in Tennessee. Photo by Garry Peeples, USFWS.

    Women lead the effort on Appalachian mountain-top forests

    May 24, 2018 | 8 minute read

    The story of an ambitious effort to restore red spruce to the Southern Appalachians spearheaded by four women brought together by a commitment to the highest peaks east of the Mississippi River.  Learn more...

  • Explore Little Hump Mountain, honored by local brewery’s seasonal beer

    March 24, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Following the release of their spring seasonal beer, Little Hump Spring Ale, Highland Brewing Company is teaming with the Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to offer an opportunity to learn about and visit the peak recognized by the seasonal beer, Little Hump Mountain, found in the Roan Mountain area of Mitchell County. On April 6, the brewery will host Jay Leutze in their tasting room, from 6:00 to 7:00 p.  Learn more...

  • Highland Brewing Company joins effort to protect important mountain peaks

    June 3, 2010 | 3 minute read

    The day after he arrived in Asheville, Ben Wicker, an employee of Highland Brewing Company, was invited to paddle the South Toe River by a near stranger – an event that helped solidify his love of these mountains and his fondness for the area’s people. Today, Ben is helping drive an effort by Highland Brewing to give back to the mountains that provide Highland employees with off-duty recreation, supply the water for its beer, and lend their names to the company’s seasonal brews.  Learn more...

News

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Information icon Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 53 Southeastern species

    June 20, 2019 | 9 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 53 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before August, 19, 2019. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • A man with a head lamp looks for spiders below a rock outcrop.
    Fred Coyle searching for spruce-fir moss spiders. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Spruce fir moss spider

    June 23, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. It was quite balmy in Asheville on that particular late-May morning. While the weather may be warm and clear in town, it’s no indication of conditions above 6000 feet, on the shoulders of Mount Mitchell, the highest peak east of the Mississippi River. It’s there, on the mountain-top islands of cool, moist climate, where you’ll find the spruce-fir moss spider.  Learn more...

  • A river runs through a valley in fall.
    Little Tennessee River. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Endangered Species Day

    May 23, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. It’s a little-known day among the litany of spring time holidays and celebrations, but here at the Fish and Wildlife Service, we like to think it important. Overshadowed by Earth Day, its April counterpart, May brings us Endangered Species Day. I recently had the chance to visit the Atlanta Zoo, and perhaps the cutest thing to be seen was the young panda bear, lounging in its hammock.  Learn more...

  • A river runs through a valley in fall.
    Eastern small-footed bat. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    The value of bats

    May 16, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. As the bat disease white-nose syndrome continues decimating bat populations as it spreads across North America, a question many people have, is… so what? They’re just bats, what good are they? According to a recent article in the journal Science, they’re worth at least $3 billion to U.S. agriculture. The value of the pest-control services to agriculture provided by bats in the U.  Learn more...

  • A man with a head lamp looks for spiders below a rock outcrop.
    Fred Coyle searching for spruce-fir moss spiders. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Spruce-fir moss spider

    October 27, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Our two-year old daughter has picked up a fascination with spiders, stemming from, as near as we can interpret, a bad dream involving the 8-legged creatures. Perhaps a little odd, since to our knowledge she’s never had a negative interaction with the animals, but now she takes the time to call attention to any spider webs she comes across and pauses and stares curiously at any spiders she finds.  Learn more...

  • Dozens of green plants in the shape of a pitcher.
    Information icon Clump of green pitcher plants. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Endangered Species Day 2010

    May 18, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature May 22 is Endangered Species Day. The phrase endangered species often brings to mind animals like panda bears and elephants, but the Southern Appalachians is home to a plethora of fascinating imperiled species. Our region is home to the spruce-fir moss spider – the world’s smallest tarantula, coming in about the size of a pencil eraser. It lives in the moss beds beneath the spruce-fir forests on our highest mountaintops.  Learn more...

  • Bright purple flowers emerge from large bushes on the side of a mountain.
    Information icon Rhododendron on Roan Mountain. Photo by Jim Liestman, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Roan Mountain - a biological gem

    October 9, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The view from Jane Bald is impressive. On a good day. The day I was there, the fog was socked in, accompanied by a constant strong wind. Although the beautiful views were missing, we were able to watch the wind rush the fog through the neighboring gap as if we were watching a stream squeeze between a pair of rocks.  Learn more...

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