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Tag: Spruce-Fir Forest

The content below has been tagged with the term “Spruce-Fir Forest.”

Podcasts

  • A man wearing a backwards highland brewing company hat.
    Highland Brewing Company supporting mountain conservation. Cattail Peak hike, June 2010. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Highland Brewing Company steps up to help high elevation habitat

    June 8, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature It’s no secret that Asheville has established itself as a beer capital of the country, and the anchor of that status is Highland Brewing Company, the largest and oldest brewer in town. At the beginning of the summer, Highland will begin distributing its summer seasonal beer, Cattail Peak Wheat. Cattail Peak sits in the Black Mountains, just north of the highest mountain in the Eastern United States – Mount Mitchell.  Learn more...

  • Dozens of green plants in the shape of a pitcher.
    Information icon Clump of green pitcher plants. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Endangered Species Day 2010

    May 18, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature May 22 is Endangered Species Day. The phrase endangered species often brings to mind animals like panda bears and elephants, but the Southern Appalachians is home to a plethora of fascinating imperiled species. Our region is home to the spruce-fir moss spider – the world’s smallest tarantula, coming in about the size of a pencil eraser. It lives in the moss beds beneath the spruce-fir forests on our highest mountaintops.  Learn more...

  • Bright purple flowers emerge from large bushes on the side of a mountain.
    Information icon Rhododendron on Roan Mountain. Photo by Jim Liestman, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Roan Mountain - a biological gem

    October 9, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The view from Jane Bald is impressive. On a good day. The day I was there, the fog was socked in, accompanied by a constant strong wind. Although the beautiful views were missing, we were able to watch the wind rush the fog through the neighboring gap as if we were watching a stream squeeze between a pair of rocks.  Learn more...

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