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Tag: Species Status Assessment

The content below has been tagged with the term “Species Status Assessment.”

Faq

  • A bright green irrodescent fish in a small blue net.
    Information icon Barrens topminnow. Photo by Emily Granstaff, USFWS.

    Proposed listing of the Barrens topminnow

    January 3, 2018 | 7 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? We are proposing to list the Barrens topminnow as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). What does it mean when a species is listed as endangered? A species is listed in one of two categories: endangered or threatened. An endangered species is one that is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range.  Learn more...

News

  • A small, blue and yellow fish floating above rocky substrate
    Information icon Tippecanoe darter. Photo © Robert Criswell, used with permission.

    Tiny freshwater fish does not warrant federal protection

    December 18, 2018 | 3 minute read

    After a thorough scientific review, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that populations of the Tippecanoe darter, a small freshwater fish, do not warrant federal protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). In some places, surveys suggest increasing populations, likely due to improvements in water quality. One of the smallest darters in the world, the Tippecanoe darter continues to be found across its historical range in larger streams and rivers of the Ohio River watershed in Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and West Virginia.  Read the full story...

  • A bright green irrodescent fish in a small blue net.
    Information icon Barrens topminnow. Photo by Emily Granstaff, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes endangered status for Barrens topminnow

    January 3, 2018 | 4 minute read

    The Barrens Plateau is home to a beautiful, iridescent fish that rarely grows longer than four inches and is found in only a few creeks and springs in four Tennessee counties. That little fish is now in trouble, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to help protect it as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Barrens topminnow has suffered from introduction of the non-native western mosquitofish, which has invaded the minnow’s habitat, outcompeting it for food and directly preying on young topminnows.  Read the full story...

  • A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.
    Information icon Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

    Bat, snail, and popular plant may need endangered species protection

    December 19, 2017 | 5 minute read

    More research is needed on three species before U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials can determine whether to add them to the threatened and endangered species list. More scientific and commercial information will be compiled for the Venus flytrap, located in the Carolinas; oblong rocksnail, located in Alabama; and tricolored bat, located in 38 states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. The Service and its partners will continue to research the species’ life history, biological requirements and habitats to develop a Species Status Assessment (SSA) and 12-month finding.  Read the full story...

  • A small fish with dark stripes on a yellow tinged back and white belly.
    Information icon Blackfin sucker. Photo by Matthew Thomas, KDFWR.

    Endangered Species Act protections not needed for Southeastern fish and crayfish

    December 5, 2017 | 2 minute read

    A crayfish found in sinkholes and freshwater spring caves in the Florida panhandle and a small fish found in clear headwater streams of the Upper Barren River System in Kentucky and Tennessee, do not warrant listing under the Endangered Species Act.  Read the full story...

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