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Tag: Southern Appalachian Creature Feature

The content below has been tagged with the term “Southern Appalachian Creature Feature.”

Podcasts

  • A family of ducks swimming in a line.
    Ruddy duck at Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Tom Koerner, USFWS.

    Duck stamp

    July 13, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The 2015-2016 Federal Duck Stamp was recently unveiled, and features a pair of ruddy ducks painted by wildlife artist Jennifer Miller of Olean, New York. Last fall, a panel of five judges chose Miller’s art from among 186 entries at the Federal Duck Stamp Art Contest. Miller is the third woman to win the Federal Duck Stamp Contest. A federal duck stamp is required for hunting waterfowl.  Learn more...

  • A tiny turtle with orange patches on the side of its throat crawls through the grass
    A young bog turtle in an Appalachian bog. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Working lands for bog turtles

    July 13, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Western North Carolina is dotted with farm fields, and while most don’t even draw notice from those driving by, contrary to conventional wisdom some of these farm fields play a key role in conserving one of our rarest turtles – the bog turtle. Bog turtles are North America’s smallest turtle, and protected by the Endangered Species Act. These are two populations – a northern and southern, with the southern population centered on western North Carolina.  Learn more...

  • Two reddish black bear cubs hustle down a gravel path.
    You never know what you'll see along the road or in a nearby field or forest when you take the Alligator River Refuge tram tour. Photo by Jackie Orsulak.

    Living with bears

    June 15, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Bears have been in the news a lot recently, most notably related to a hiker who was pulled from his hammock by a bear in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. According to the Park Service’s report, the young man, and his father, who were traveling together, had properly stored their equipment, food, and packs on aerial food storage cables.  Learn more...

  • A butterfly covered in white spots with orange and yellow wings perched on a purple flower.
    Information icon A monarch butterfly on a purple plant with bright colors in the background. Photo by Christine Lisiewski.

    Tennessee supports monarchs

    June 8, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Features. On the heels of numerous pollinator gardens being installed in western North Carolina, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency has announced a major effort to help save monarch butterflies. The agency, along with the National Wildlife Federation, Tennessee Wildlife Federation, Tennessee Parks and Greenways Foundation, Mississippi River Corridor and The Nature Conservancy are partnering with Roundstone Native Seed Company to save the butterflies.  Learn more...

  • A tiny turtle with orange patches on the side of its throat crawls through the grass
    A young bog turtle in an Appalachian bog. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Tracking bog turtles

    June 1, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. I’ve often talked about southern Appalachian Mountain bogs, their rarity, and the rareness of many of the plants and animals found in them. There’s a bog south of Asheville that’s a bittersweet place. Despite development in its vicinity, it still hangs on, and in fact people in the community recognize its importance. What makes it a sad place is it used to be home to one of the best bog turtle populations in the southeast.  Learn more...

  • A small, brown, furry bat in a gloved hand.
    Information icon Northern long-eared bat caught at Roanoke River National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

    Northern long-eared bat on endangered species list

    May 18, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. On May fourth, the northern long-eared bat was added to the federal endangered species list as a threatened animal. What makes this listing especially notable, is it’s the first related to the fungal disease white-nose syndrome, which has killed millions of bats in eastern and central North America. In the United States, the northern long-eared bat is found from Maine to North Carolina on the Atlantic Coast, westward to Oklahoma and north through the Dakotas, reaching into eastern Montana and Wyoming.  Learn more...

  • A butterfly covered in white spots with orange and yellow wings perched on a purple flower.
    Information icon A monarch butterfly on a purple plant with bright colors in the background. Photo by Christine Lisiewski.

    Monarch butterfly conservation

    May 11, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. In the wake of dramatically declining populations, last year the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was asked to place the monarch butterfly on the endangered species list, beginning a process of reviewing data and scientific literature to determine if listing is warranted. However, people aren’t waiting for that final decision, and instead are proactively working to boost monarch numbers. The Asheville-based Monarch Rescue is among those leading the charge in the Southern Appalachians, funded in part by the Fish and Wildlife Service.  Learn more...

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Mountain Bogs National Wildlife Refuge establishment

    May 4, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This past spring Mountain Bogs National Wildlife Refuge became America’s 563rd refuge. National Wildlife Refuges are lands managed by, or in partnership with, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for the conservation of fish, wildlife, and plants. This new national wildlife refuge is devoted to the conservation of southern Appalachian mountain bogs, one of the rarest and most imperiled habitats in the United States.  Learn more...

  • The rising sun paints a row of mountains beautiful shades of purple.
    Clingmans Dome at Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Photo by Matthew Paulson, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park visitation

    January 19, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. For the fourth time in 80 years, Great Smoky Mountains National Park had over ten million annual visitors in a single year. In 2014, 10,099,275 visitors visited the park, an 8% increase over 2013. The other years when visitation topped ten million were 1987, 1999, 2000. These numbers are good news for a lot of folks. They give the National Park Service something to cheer about and they demonstrate the park’s economic power, as more visitors means more people spending money in the communities around the park.  Learn more...

  • The rising sun paints a row of mountains beautiful shades of purple.
    Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Photo by Steve Harwood, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park firewood restrictions

    January 5, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. I’ve previously spoke about a proposal by Great Smoky Mountains National Park to limit the spread of invasive insects into the park by limiting the type of firewood that could be brought into the park, and come March 2015, those news rules will go into effect. Firewood has long been known to be a vector for accidentally moving insects around, which can be a tremendous problem if it happens to be carrying invasive insects – it can very quickly enable those insects to spread their range into virgin territory, to the detriment of native forests.  Learn more...

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