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Tag: Southern Appalachian Creature Feature

The content below has been tagged with the term “Southern Appalachian Creature Feature.”

Podcasts

  • A shiny green insect burrowed into a tree.
    Emerald ashe borer. Photo by USDA.

    Emerald ash borer control

    September 21, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. On a recent camping trip to Great Smoky Mountains National Park, it bore remembering that the park only allows outside firewood that is certified as being heated to the point that undesirable insects hitching a ride on the wood would be killed. One of the undesirable insects that is already in the park is the emerald ash borer. This Asian insect was first detected in the United States in Michigan in 2002 and has killed tens of millions of ash trees across the U.  Learn more...

  • A colorful yellow and red trout covered in small black spots.
    Information icon A wildlife biologist holds a rainbow trout. Photo by Mark Lisac, USFWS.

    Cold water species and climate change

    September 14, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. New research on the effects of warming temperatures and stream acidity projects average habitat losses of around 10 percent for coldwater aquatic species in southern Appalachian national forests – including up to a 20 percent loss of habitat in the Pisgah and Nantahala National Forests. The researchers, from the Forest Service, Oregon State University, and E&S Environmental Chemistry, focused on streams draining seven national forests in the southern Appalachian region, first mapping out how much of the area’s current habitat is suitable for acid- and heat-sensitive animals such as the native eastern brook trout.  Learn more...

  • A colorful green/brown and red trout covered in small red spots.
    Information icon A wildlife biologist holds a small eastern brook trout. Photo by Steve Droter, Chesapeake Bay Program.

    Whirling disease and North Carolina

    September 7, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Whirling disease, a parasitic disease affecting trout and salmon, has been found in North Carolina. The disease, native to Europe, affects trout and salmon by damaging nerves and cartilage, which may result in abnormal whirling or tail-chasing behavior. Other signs are a black tail and deformities to the head or body. These abnormalities in behavior and body make the fish more susceptible to predation and make it more difficult for the fish to find food.  Learn more...

  • A monarch butterfly perched on a bushy plant with bright yellow flowers.
    Monarch fueling up for migration. Photo by Lilibeth Serrano, USFWS.

    Pollinator garden success

    August 31, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature Staff at the Asheville-based non-profit Monarch Rescue recently reported that monarch butterfly eggs and caterpillars were found at a pollinator garden they worked with students to install at Yancey County’s Mountain Heritage High School. The high-school pollinator garden is one of 100 sties recently added to the Rosalynn Carter Butterfly Trial. The trail, established in April 2013, raises awareness of the monarch’s plight and encourages the conservation of butterflies and their habitats.  Learn more...

  • Tall stems extending from the forest floor give way to bright white dangling flowers.
    Information icon White fringeless orchid. Photo by USFWS.

    North Carolina receives bog conservation grant

    August 24, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently announced 37.2 million dollars in grants to 20 states to support the conservation of threatened and endangered species across the nation, and a portion of that money is coming to the southern Appalachians. The North Carolina Plant Conservation Program is receiving more than $41,000 to help acquire seven Henderson County acres that are home to an endangered and a threatened plant.  Learn more...

  • A colorful yellow and red trout covered in small black spots.
    Information icon A wildlife biologist holds a rainbow trout. Photo by Mark Lisac, USFWS.

    Gill lice in North Carolina

    August 17, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Fresh off of discovering whirling disease for the first time in North Carolina, fisheries biologists with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission recently confirmed gill lice on rainbow trout in three North Carolina streams. Gill lice—which are actually tiny, white crustaceans—attach to a fish’s gill, which can inhibit the fish’s ability to breathe. While most fish are able to tolerate a moderate infestation of gill lice, some fish, particularly those suffering from other stressors like drought or high water temperatures, can succumb.  Learn more...

  • A colorful fall scene with a road cutting through.
    Information icon Lynn Cove Viaduct, Blue Ridge Parkway, North Carolina. Photo by Matthew Paulson, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Blue Ridge Parkway bio-blitz

    August 10, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The Blue Ridge Parkway, the National Park Service unit that stretches from Great Smoky Mountains National Park, along the Blue Ridge Mountains, to Virginia’s Shenandoah National Park, is hosting a bio-blitz in mid-September. The blitz will be a 24-hour period, when experts on plants, mushrooms, birds, and other forms of life will descend on the Rock Castle Gorge area of the Parkway in southwest Virginia.  Learn more...

  • Three women in wet suits snorkeling in a shallow river.
    Oconaluftee River snorkelers. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    River snorkeling

    August 3, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. We’re in the heat of summer, and one thing is evident – river recreation is on the uptick this year. Why not add a new dimension to hitting the water? We think of snorkeling as a tropical, saltwater pastime, but there’s no reason we can’t bring it to freshwater, and there’s no better place than the rivers of the Southern Appalachians.  Learn more...

  • Outdoor Heritage Act

    July 25, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. North Carolina governor Pat McCrory recently signed into law the Outdoor Heritage Act. The act does a handful of things, the one that has gotten the most attention is that it allows for hunting on Sundays with the use of firearms on private property with written permission from the landowner, beginning Oct. 1, with the following provisions: Hunting on Sunday between 9:30 a.  Learn more...

  • A low-growing shrub on a rocket mountain with bright yellow flowers.
    Mountain golden heather near Linville Gorge. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Mountain golden heather monitoring

    July 20, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Despite the elevation, it was quite hot, as the midday sun fell on the dry ridge running along Linville Gorge. We were there to monitor mountain golden heather, a threatened plant. Despite being a Wednesday, an off day for outdoor recreation, during three three or four hours we were in the sun counting plants, several people hiked by on the trail that bisected our work area.  Learn more...

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