skip to content

Tag: Southern Appalachian Creature Feature

The content below has been tagged with the term “Southern Appalachian Creature Feature.”

Podcasts

  • A white and black hornet.
    Bald-faced hornet. Photo by Carin Rhoden, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    The bald-faced hornet is one of the South’s most famous and feared insects

    April 17, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. At our oldest daughter’s pre-school there’s a nature table that brings artifacts of the natural world a little closer to the hands of three and four year olds. Scattered across the table are seeds, bones, crystals, and leaves. A parent recently brought in a new addition – small, round, paper hornet’s nest. These paper balls that simultaneously evoke aversion and curiosity are made by the bald-faced hornet, which isn’t a true hornet, but a wasp found across much of North America and common here in the Southeast.  Learn more...

  • Protection of the McElrath property helps protect an important stream and national forest

    April 10, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings, and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. We wanted our oldest daughter’s first camping trip to be close to home in case panic struck in the middle of the night and to limit time cooped up in a car. We also wanted plenty of opportunity for childhood exploration - always better if water is present. We arrived at the North Mills River recreation area, near the Asheville airport, on a Saturday afternoon to find the campground full.  Learn more...

  • Two students wearing waders in a stream inspect a seine.
    Western North Carolina’s Pigeon River is home to the endangered Appalachian elktoe mussel. Photo by Gary Peeples.

    The Southeastern drought impedes efforts to recover the Pigeon River

    April 3, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The Pigeon River flows across North Carolina’s Haywood County and into Tennessee, where it joins the French Broad River. The river is infamous for the historical levels of pollution from the Champion Paper mill in Canton, North Carolina - pollution which eliminated a lot of life from the river. Although not yet to a point many people would like, the effluent from the mill, now Blue Ridge Paper, is a lot cleaner than it used to be and for several years the University of Tennessee has led a project to help restore some of the aquatic diversity to the Pigeon River.  Learn more...

  • Eastern Tennessee’s Rocky Fork Tract receives protections

    March 27, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The future I-26 out of Asheville and over to Erwin, Tennessee is about as scenic of a drive as you can get on a four-lane interstate. Crossing the state line and dropping into Tennessee, I’ve always been fascinated by the seemingly endless forest one sees off to the west giving the appearance of a wild frontier, waiting to be hiked.  Learn more...

  • Triangular green leaves with sharp, throny vines.
    Mile-a-minute weed. Photo by John Beetham, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.

    Tearthumb - a fascinating if painful wetland plant

    March 20, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Immediately before heading out into the field, I went over the list of gear – food, water, first aid kit, rubber boots. I had everything. Except the long-sleeved shirt. Not a big deal, I thought. I had the most important things. And I did. But marching through the muck of a Southern Appalachian bog, the long-sleeve shirt would’ve been nice.  Learn more...

  • The Hidden Reservoir - a new report looks at ways to save water on a large scale

    March 13, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Although its presence in the forefront of the news has long since passed, the fact remains that the Southeast is still in a drought. Water management in the Southeast is going to become increasingly challenging – with the future of numerous fish and mussel species hanging in the balance, and an increasing population steadily increasing water demand. In a nod toward the increasing scarcity, the non-profit American Rivers recently published a report, Hidden Reservoir: Why Water Efficiency is the Best Solution in the Southeast.  Learn more...

  • A brown frog pokes its head through the water.
    Leopard frog. Photo by Jonathan Brenncke, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    A new study looks at pesticide and frog deaths

    March 6, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. It’s become a right of spring in our home to venture to the neighbor’s backyard ponds, get a handful of frog eggs, put them in a jar in the middle of the dining room table and watch them mature into frogs. Hopefully this is a tradition we can maintain for years to come. It’s well-known that amphibians around the globe are experiencing a die-off.  Learn more...

  • A winding road cuts through a forested mountain in fall colors.
    Cherohala Skyway. Photo by Dzmitry (Dima) Parul, CC BY 2.0.

    Getting rare flying squirrels across the Cherohala Skyway road

    February 27, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The Cherohala Skyway is a 36-mile road connecting Robbinsville, North Carolina with Tellico Plains, Tennessee. It’s scenic, curvy, and desolate, cutting across Nantahala and Cherokee National Forests with no amenities aside from bathrooms. This lonesome ribbon of road may not seem to impact wildlife, but try looking at it through the eyes of a flying squirrel. There are two subspecies of flying squirrels in the Southern Appalachians: the more common Southern flying squirrel, which is sometimes a pest in people’s homes, and the endangered northern flying squirrel, which lives only at extremely high elevations, including along the Cherohala Skyway.  Learn more...

  • A small oval spider with long legs perched on a fern in a forest.
    Daddy longlegs at the Charlie Elliott Wildlife Center. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Daddy longlegs

    February 20, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Slides, and swings are quickly forgotten when there’s a daddy longlegs in the vicinity and our three-year old focuses her efforts on picking up the fragile arachnid with her tiny hands. Though daddy longlegs are arachnids, they aren’t spiders. They lack silk glands and don’t have as many eyes as spiders. While a spider’s two body sections are distinct, in a daddy longlegs they come together such that they give the appearance of a single-sectioned oval body.  Learn more...

  • A biologist uses a caliper to measure a tiny turtle with orange markings on its neck
    Measuring a bog turtle. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Protecting rare bogs means protecting their water flow

    February 13, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. “You’re not going to find any if you don’t stick your hand in,” was the instruction. We were searching for bog turtles, the smallest turtle in North America and one that’s federally protected. To find a bog turtle, you dip a long stick into the muck and mud of a bog bottom, hoping to tap the shell of the tiny animals, which measure only about four inches long.  Learn more...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn