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Tag: Southeast Conservation Adaptation Strategy

The content below has been tagged with the term “Southeast Conservation Adaptation Strategy.”

Articles

  • Two Southeast Region employees nominated for national science awards

    February 28, 2018 | 3 minute readEvery year, the Service honors science leadership through three national awards. This year, the Southeast Region has two nominees for those awards, Bill Uihlein and Yvonne Allen. Both have demonstrated visionary leadership and innovation in helping the Service use science to address complex problems. Allen, an ecologist from the Gulf Coastal Plains and Ozarks Landscape Conservation Cooperative, has been nominated for the Rachel Carson Award. This award recognizes scientific excellence through the rigorous application of science to a conservation problem. Learn more...

  • An open gate surrounded by live oaks covered in Spanish moss.

    A gem for hunters and hikers alike

    July 12, 2017 | 4 minute readBrunswick, Georgia – Altama Plantation is perhaps the most critical, and intriguing, piece of property along the entire Altamaha River corridor. It was here in the early 1800s that plantation owner James Hamilton Couper introduced the Dutch system of tidal floodgates to grow rice. He planted sugar cane and built a refinery whose red-brick remains still stand. Couper, a noted scientist, also recorded the first eastern indigo snake, a threatened species which bears his name (Drymarchon couperi). Learn more...

    Altama Plantation. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

  • A gentlman with gray hair poses for the camera with a smile and his arms crossed.

    Local landowner fights for the Altamaha

    July 12, 2017 | 3 minute readJesup, Georgia – “Well now, welcome to the swamp.” Dink NeSmith stands astride a weathered wooden dock on Sandy Lake, a meandering offshoot of the Altamaha River. To some, the oxbow lake is nothing but a muddy, buggy, alligator-friendly bog. To NeSmith, it’s an open-air cathedral in all its natural “majesty.” “God put it here a long time ago,” he preached, “and it’s on loan to my family and me and we want to do our part to make sure it remains a clean, safe environment for our great, great, great, great grandchildren. Learn more...

    Mr. Dink NeSmith has a special relationship with the Altamaha River. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

  • The sun sets over a lush green marsh cut in half by a calm brackish channel.

    Many partners work together to protect “the Amazon of the South” for generations to come

    July 12, 2017 | 13 minute readIt meanders 137 miles through the wild heart of Georgia, a blackwater beauty that nourishes longleaf pine forests, cypress swamps, saltwater estuaries and the barrier islands that protect the Atlantic coast and migratory birds alike. Learn more...

    Salt marsh along the Altamaha River. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

  • Wiry pine trees sparsley dot a sandy landscape.

    A harmonious future for profits, pine and at-risk species along the Florida-Alabama line

    May 9, 2017 | 7 minute readPace, Florida — Longleaf pine forests once covered 90 million acres from Virginia to Texas, a bio-diverse swath of timber prized by shipbuilders and gopher tortoises alike. Sprawling cities, large farms and commercial pine plantations, though, replaced much of the longleaf habitat. Today, less than five million acres remain. Conservationists’ goal of eight million acres by 2025 seemed laughable. Until Resource Management Service and Jimmy Bullock came along. Map of the Coastal Headwaters Forest by the Conservation Fund and RMS. Learn more...

    A field of young longleaf pine at the Coastal Headwaters Forest. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

  • A bearded man wearing a bike helmet and kit in front of wildflowers.

    Employee spotlight: Dr. Wylie Carr, external affairs

    May 3, 2017 | 2 minute readWylie Carr’s job as a social scientist for conservation is to look at the forests to help save the trees for our children and grandchildren to enjoy. He sees conservation as an inherently biological and social endeavor. Learn more...

    Dr. Wiley Carr enjoying a bike ride. Photo by Wylie Carr, USFWS>

  • A group of children runs through shallow water with a net in the foreground.

    Conserving the Tennessee River Basin: it takes a village

    April 11, 2017 | 3 minute readFor Shannon O’Quinn, a watershed specialist at the Tennessee Valley Authority, the Tennessee River provides much more than a livelihood. “It is a special place to my family,” he says. “It is where we live and play and work to ensure the river stays healthy for people and wildlife.” Considering that the Tennessee River Basin is one of the most biologically diverse watersheds in North America, that’s a critically important job. Learn more...

    Collecting fish in the North Toe River. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

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