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Tag: South Dakota

The content below has been tagged with the term “South Dakota.”

Faq

  • A black beetle with orange markings on its back, the ends of its antenae and its fore legs
    Information icon American burying beetle. Photo by Mark Dumont, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    American burying beetle Endangered Species Act downlisting proposal and 4(d) rule

    May 1, 2019 | 13 minute read

    What is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposing? The Service is proposing to downlist the American burying beetle from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). This proposal is based on a thorough review of the best available science and information, including the recently completed Species Status Assessment (SSA), indicating the beetle is not presently in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range.  Learn more...

News

Podcasts

  • A yellow and black bee lands on a bright pink/purple flower.
    Bee at a Heller’s blazing star flower. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Poaching a threat to our natural heritage

    January 19, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript A South Dakota man was recently convicted in federal court for smuggling leopard parts into the United States in a case that exposed illegal hunting in South Africa and the laundering of rare animal parts through Zimbabwe. However, illegal trade in plants and animals is not limited to cats from Africa or orchids from South America. Sadly, it happens right here in the Southern Appalachians as well. The region is home to the bog turtle, North America’s smallest turtle, and the victim of a vibrant trade in rare reptiles despite being federally protected.  Learn more...

Wildlife

  • Male and female mallard ducks on a lake
    Information icon Mallards at Morris Wetland Management District in Minnesota. Photo by Alex Galt, USFWS.

    Mallard

    Taxon: Anseriformes, Anatidae Range: Mallards occur year-round throughout North America, but most individuals are migratory and breed in the northern United States and Canada and winter in the Southern United States and Mexico. Most of the breeding population occurs in the Prairie Pothole Region of the north-central United States and central Canada. Status: Not listed, low concern – In 2018, the breeding population size exceeded 10 million in the traditional and eastern survey areas of North America.  Visit the species profile...

  • Eight northern pintails including two females and six males on a cold, winter lake
    Information icon Northern pintails at Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Clayton Ferrell, USFWS.

    Northern pintail

    Taxon: Anseriformes, Anatidae Range: Northern pintail typically breed in the Prairie Pothole Region of the north-central United States, central Canada, and Alaska. They spend their winters in the southern United States and Mexico, especially along the Texas and Louisiana coasts of the Gulf of Mexico. Status: Not listed, low concern – More than 2.3 million northern pintail were estimated in the breeding population in 2018. However, substantial declines since the 1950s has resulted in restricted harvest regulations for this species.  Visit the species profile...

  • A duck with long green and brown feathers on its head in the shape of a backwards-hat
    Information icon A wood duck at Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Robin Koch, USFWS volunteer.

    Wood duck

    Taxon: Anseriformes, Anatidae Range: Wood ducks are common year-round in the Southeastern United States and during summer and autumn throughout the Eastern United States and Canada. Wood ducks breed in most states east of the Rocky Mountains and throughout the Pacific Northwest, but they migrate from northern states and provinces to southern areas during early fall. Status: Not listed, low concern – Although breeding population estimates are not available for wood ducks based on breeding surveys, perhaps as many as 3 million breeding pairs exist across North America.  Visit the species profile...

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