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Tag: South Carolina

The content below has been tagged with the term “South Carolina.”

Bears-Bluff

  • A biologist dressed for cold weather holds an acient-looking fish on a boat at sea
    Information icon Biologist Albert Spells with Atlantic sturgeon. Photo by USFWS.

    Wildlife

    Wildlife at Bears Bluff National Fish Hatchery  Learn more...

Wildlife

  • Two cone shaped flowers with pink petals in the foreground with several similar specimens blurred in the background
    Information icon Smooth coneflower at a power-line right of way in Granville County, NC. Photo by Caroline S. Krom, USFWS.

    Smooth Coneflower

    Smooth coneflower is a perennial herb and is a composite, a cluster of flowers grouped together to form a single flower-like structure that will live for more than two years.  Visit the species profile...

  • A black, grey and yellow snake with a rounded head.
    Information icon Southern hognose snake. Photo by Pierson Hill, FWC.

    Southern hognose snake

    Taxon: Reptile Range: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina Status: At-risk species, petitioned for listing on July 11, 2012; 90-day-finding that petitioned action may be warranted First described by Carl Linneaus in 1766 from a specimen received from Charleston, South Carolina, the southern hognose snake is the smallest of the five species of hognose snakes native to North America. All belonging to the genus Heterodon, there is the eastern hognose snake (H.  Visit the species profile...

  • Bright pink conical flowers.
    Information icon Flowering swamp pink. Photo by Maja Dumat, CC BY 2.0.

    Swamp pink

    Swamp pink and it’s beautiful conical flower is only found in wetlands along streams and seepage areas in freshwater swamps.  Visit the species profile...

  • Five white swans with black feet and a black beak in flight in winter
    Information icon Tundra swans on the wing at Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

    Tundra swan

    Taxon: Anseriformes, Anatidae Range: Tundra swans breed primarily in Alaska and northern Canada and winter on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the United States. The eastern population migrates southeast to coastal areas from Delaware to North Carolina, while the western population migrates south to the Pacific Northwest and several inland areas. Status: Not listed, low concern – Continental population sizes exceed 200,000, and populations appear to have been increasing since the early 1980s.  Visit the species profile...

  • A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.
    Information icon Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

    Venus flytrap

    The Venus flytrap, a small perennial herb, is one of the most widely recognized carnivorous plant species on Earth. It occupies distinct longleaf pine habitats in the Coastal Plain and Sandhills of North and South Carolina.  Visit the species profile...

  • A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.
    Information icon Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

    Venus flytrap

    The Venus flytrap, a small perennial herb, is one of the most widely recognized carnivorous plant species on Earth. It occupies distinct longleaf pine habitats in the Coastal Plain and Sandhills of North and South Carolina.  Visit the species profile...

  • A Florida manatee calf sticks close to its mother in shallow water
    Information icon A Florida manatee calf sticks close to its mother in shallow water. Photo: Keith Ramos, USFWS

    West Indian manatee

    Manatees are large, elongated marine mammals with paired flippers and a large round or spoon-shaped tail. They can reach lengths of over 14 feet and weights of over 3,000 pounds  Visit the species profile...

  • A plant that looks similar to grass with tiny white flowers extending from the ends.
    Information icon White irisette flowers. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    White irisette

    White irisette is a perennial herb that lives in areas with partial sun and flowers from late May through July.  Visit the species profile...

  • A duck with long green and brown feathers on its head in the shape of a backwards-hat
    Information icon A wood duck at Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Robin Koch, USFWS volunteer.

    Wood duck

    Taxon: Anseriformes, Anatidae Range: Wood ducks are common year-round in the Southeastern United States and during summer and autumn throughout the Eastern United States and Canada. Wood ducks breed in most states east of the Rocky Mountains and throughout the Pacific Northwest, but they migrate from northern states and provinces to southern areas during early fall. Status: Not listed, low concern – Although breeding population estimates are not available for wood ducks based on breeding surveys, perhaps as many as 3 million breeding pairs exist across North America.  Visit the species profile...

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