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Tag: South Carolina

The content below has been tagged with the term “South Carolina.”

Articles

  • Pink flowers with petals in a conical shape and a deep red stigma.
    Information icon Heather Alley near an experimental population she planted for her master thesis. Photo courtesy of Heather Alley.

    With help from many partners, the endangered smooth coneflower fights to come back

    August 16, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Droopy and slender pink petals give it a daisy-like appearance. Delicate, yet fierce, with a tall and spiked-domed center, it thrives in places that aren’t exactly dainty. Along power line rights-of-way, roadsides, dry slopes, and other disturbed places, the smooth coneflower fights to defend its turf. Left unchecked, trees and shrubs can opportunistically overpower the open prairie-like spaces that wildflowers call home. The smooth coneflower is an endangered wild plant in the aster family.  Learn more...

  • A grass-like plant with white flowers emerges from the marsh.
    Information icon The proposed expansion would allow a population of the endangered bunched arrowhead to be conserved as part of Mountain Bogs National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    McKinney Tract in Greenville, South Carolina protects two rare plants

    June 5, 2019 | 2 minute read

    In the spring of 2019, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) acquired in fee-simple a 55-acre tract called the McKinney Tract located in Greenville County, South Carolina. This tract was purchased with Recovery Land Acquisition from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and partner funding from SCDNR and Naturaland Trust. Other partners involved included Forever, Southern Environmental Law Center, South Carolina Native Plant Society, and the SC Plant Conservation Alliance.  Learn more...

  • Two large white birds flying low over a wetland coming in for a landing with a Service biologist in the foreground
    Information icon Two endangered whooping cranes coming in for a landing. Photo by Greg Pope.

    “Journey of the Whooping Crane” follows efforts to save a rare, endangered bird

    November 30, 2018 | 2 minute read

    In 1940, only about 20 whooping cranes were known to exist. Today, thanks to the diligence of many partners working together in the United States and Canada, there are more than 850 cranes in North America and the population continues to increase slowly and steadily. The iconic bird is one of the success stories of the Endangered Species Act (ESA). But it remains one of the rarest animals in the world.  Learn more...

  • A brown sign bent in half by high winds that reads St Vincent NWR
    Information icon The sand-clogged dock with St. Vincent NWR in the background. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Survivors of the storm

    October 22, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Bradley Smith seeks evidence that the red wolves survived Hurricane Michael off St. Vincent NWR. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS. Apalachicola, Florida — Bradley Smith stood tall on the bow of the SeaArk 21-footer with a VHF antenna held high. It was quiet, too quiet. It had been six days since Hurricane Michael devastated the Panhandle and Smith was listening for signs of life on St.  Learn more...

Charleston

  • A black, grey and yellow snake with a rounded head.
    Information icon Southern hognose snake. Photo by Pierson Hill, FWC.

    South Carolina Ecological Services Field Office

    Serving the entire state of South Carolina, our mission is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.  Learn more...

News

  • Sign at the entrance of the hatchery.
    Information icon Orangeburg National Fish Hatchery. Photo by Robert Pos, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes allowing fishing in the Orangeburg National Fish Hatchery boardwalk and portion of shoreline

    May 28, 2019 | 1 minute read

    Orangeburg, South Carolina — County Hatchery Pond may soon be open to anglers, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has announced. The pond would be open for all legal species. It’s located in the Orangeburg National Fish Hatchery substation on Cannon Bridge Road in Cordova, about six miles southwest of Orangeburg. The area would be open for anglers from dawn until dusk. All state of South Carolina fishing regulations will apply.  Read the full story...

  • A backhoe breaks apart a dam in a stream
    Information icon Heavy machinery gets to work removing the Congaree Creek Dam near Columbia, SC. Photo by Kaley Lawrence, SCDNR.

    Small dam scheduled to be removed from Columbia-area creek

    May 16, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Through a successful partnership, the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR), American Rivers, Congaree Riverkeeper and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) are happy to announce plans to remove a small dam from one Columbia-area creek starting May 21. Removal of the small sheet pile dam in the Congaree Creek would result in restoring the natural flow of the stream, improving habitat for aquatic species, and removing a safety hazard for boaters.  Read the full story...

  • A bird of prey flying over a wetland.
    Information icon Everglades snail kite at Lake Kissimmee, Florida. Photo by South Florida Wetland Management District.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 36 Southeastern species

    April 11, 2019 | 6 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 36 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. They are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before June 10, 2019. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate, and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

  • A light orange salamander with a bright orange stripe
    Information icon Juvenile striped newt. Photo by FWC.

    Conservation partnerships help keep two birds, salamander and skink from requiring endangered species act protections

    December 18, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Following rigorous scientific reviews, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that, thanks in part to ongoing conservation partnerships, four southeastern animals do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future. Accordingly, the MacGillivray’s seaside sparrow, Florida sandhill crane, striped newt and Cedar Key mole skink do not warrant Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection. “Our efforts working closely with diverse partners to proactively understand and address threats to wildlife is succeeding,” said Leo Miranda, the Service’s Southeast regional director.  Read the full story...

  • New regional director to head southeastern conservation efforts Fish and Wildlife Service

    December 10, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Service officials announced late last month that Leopoldo “Leo” Miranda will head the Service’s Southeast Region. The tract encompasses 10 southeastern states as well as Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.  Read the full story...

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