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Tag: South Carolina

The content below has been tagged with the term “South Carolina.”

Articles

A man wearing a yellow hard hat and firefighting gear

On the front lines

July 27, 2018 | 7 minute readAustin Griffin and Stephen McGuin are training to become wildland firefighters, an odd career choice given their unusual, at-times troubled backgrounds. Yet they’re perfect fits for a still-new training program crafted by The Nature Conservancy (TNC) to put a diverse and economically disadvantaged cadre of young men and women on the front firefighting lines. Learn more...

Stephen McGuin. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

Veterans carry their hog through a swamp.

Hog heaven

March 28, 2018 | 3 minute readFeral pigs are widely considered a nuisance species. The wild hogs cause an estimated $1.5 billion in property damage every year all over the United States on both public and private lands, according to the Mississippi State University Center for Resolving Human-Wildlife Conflicts. They are an invasive species that can disrupt entire food chains. “They’re really bad for the ecosystem,” said Craig Sasser, refuge manager at Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge in South Carolina. Learn more...

Two wounded warriors and a volunteer, accompanied by a cameraman, carry a feral pig through the swamp at Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by SOWW.

Two dozen primary school students gather around an instructor and a small fire.

Wood Magic happens at Sewee Visitor Center

December 21, 2017 | 2 minute readHave you ever wondered how paper is made from trees? Do you know why it’s important to recycle paper? Do you know that when a log is cut at the saw mill everything is used to make different wood products? Why do foresters use prescribed burning for forested areas? What are some gifts from the forest? Just ask South Carolina a fifth graders who attended the Wood Magic Forest Fair at the the Service’s Sewee Visitor and Environmental Education Center in Awendaw, South Carolina in November. Learn more...

Describing the benefits of prescribed fire. Photo by Durwin Carter, USFWS.

A small green plant growing in a sand dune with bright red/pink stems.

From Massachusetts to South Carolina, recovering seabeach amaranth

December 7, 2017 | 6 minute readThis is a story about people, places and a plant — but it’s more than just that. This is a story about faith in a tiny little seed and the huge potential for recovering a threatened species. First things first — the plant Most people have probably never heard of seabeach amaranth, but for such an obscure little dune plant, it bears a mighty burden. This low-growing annual colonizes newly disturbed habitats such as over-wash areas at the end of barrier islands and flat, low-lying areas along the foremost dunes. Learn more...

Seabeach amaranth at Onslow Beach, Camp Lejeune, NC. Photo by Lilibeth Serrano, USFWS.

A woodpecker perched on a tree with a bug in its mouth

The woodpecker’s journey

November 20, 2017 | 9 minute readIt was getting dark. A light rain fell. Distant thunder rolled across the steamy, late-summer sky. The hunters were apprehensive. Their prey: endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers. Learn more...

A red-cockaded woodpecker has dinner outside its nesting cavity. Photo by USFWS.

A building built on steel footings ready for hurricane force winds.

Service facilities built to withstand nature’s worst

November 9, 2017 | 5 minute readHurricanes are never welcome, but they can prompt changes in buildings to make them better, stronger, and more capable of handling high water and even higher winds. Learn more...

The rebuilt Grand Bay National Wildlife Refuge visitor's center built to withstand future storms.

Bright green grass emerges from a huge marsh.

Refuges reach out to urban visitors

November 8, 2017 | 7 minute readHilton Head Island, South Carolina – The hiker was in bad shape. Overweight and exhausted, she had crumpled into a sitting position along the Ibis Pond Trail at the Pinckney Island National Wildlife Refuge. Her face turned red, almost purple. Sweat poured in torrents. Her breathing was labored. Heat stroke seemed imminent under the searing sun with temperatures nearing 100 degrees. Monica Harris and Nancy Fernandez – mercifully – happened by in their U. Learn more...

Pinckney Island National Wildlife Refuge in South Carolina is a kayaker’s paradise. Photo by Eric Horan, USFWS.

News

Secretary Zinke announces more that $1.1 billion for sportsmen and conservation

March 20, 2018 | 4 minute readHoricon, Wisconsin – Today U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke traveled to Horicon, Wisconsin, where he announced more than $1.1 billion in annual national funding for state wildlife agencies from revenues generated by the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration and Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration (PRDJ) acts. The Secretary presented a ceremonial check to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources for $34,966,603 while visiting the Horicon Marsh State Wildlife Area. Download state-by-state listings of the final Fiscal Year 2018 apportionments of the Wildlife Restoration Program fund and the Sport Fish Restoration Program fund. Read the full story...

A tiny yellow/orange frog with big round eyes.

Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of eight southeastern species

March 9, 2018 | 3 minute readAs part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of eight endangered fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before May 11, 2018. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis. Read the full story...

Coqui Llanero. Photo by Luis J. Villanueva CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.

A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.

Bat, snail, and popular plant may need endangered species protection

December 19, 2017 | 5 minute readMore research is needed on three species before U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials can determine whether to add them to the threatened and endangered species list. More scientific and commercial information will be compiled for the Venus flytrap, located in the Carolinas; oblong rocksnail, located in Alabama; and tricolored bat, located in 38 states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. The Service and its partners will continue to research the species’ life history, biological requirements and habitats to develop a Species Status Assessment (SSA) and 12-month finding. Read the full story...

Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

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