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Tag: South Carolina

The content below has been tagged with the term “South Carolina.”

Articles

  • Three young longleaf pine trees growing in a larger forest
    Information icon Young longleaf pine at The Jones Center, also known as Ichauway. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Woodpecker swap meet

    January 13, 2020 | 9 minute read

    Tallahassee, Florida — Will McDearman stood on a chair, raised his voice and beseeched the hundred or so wildlife officials gathered in a nondescript auditorium to offer up every woodpecker they could find. “Are all the birds on the table?” he asked. Murmurs of assent followed. McDearman, like an auctioneer, then ended the bidding that joined woodpecker donor with woodpecker donee. “Going once,” he said. “Going twice,” he said.  Learn more...

  • Learning about aquatic invertebrates

    January 10, 2020 | 1 minute read

    In November 2019, Bears Bluff National Fish Hatchery staff held an aquatic invertebrate diversity lab with four third and fourth grade classes and one gifted and talented class at James B. Edwards Elementary School in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina.  Learn more...

  • A calm river banked on both sides by tall trees.
    Information icon Groton Plantation fronts 24 miles of the Savannah River. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    What the world used to look like

    December 11, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Estill, South Carolina — The descendants of John Winthrop, founder of the Massachusetts Bay Colony nearly 400 years ago, recently set aside 14,000 acres along the Savannah River that will forever remain undeveloped. It is the largest private conservation easement in South Carolina history. Its significance, though, goes well beyond the creation of a natural bulwark against overdevelopment and forest loss. A bevy of private, commercial, nonprofit and government donors, including the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, cobbled together the $12.  Learn more...

  • A green toad with dark spots in a biologist’s gloved hand
    Information icon Biologists at the Saratoga National Fish Hatchery in Wyoming hopped at the chance to raise the endangered Wyoming toad. Photo by USFWS.

    They’re growing what?

    November 6, 2019 | 9 minute read

    In Virginia and South Carolina hatcheries, biologists keep a close eye on shad and striped bass while taking time to focus on something that will never wear scales: mussels. And down in Florida, hatchery scientists charged with making sure rivers and streams are stocked with catfish and bass are singing the praises of a tiny bird they’re raising outside their labs. The Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery is growing alligator snapping turtles to boost that species’ population.  Learn more...

  • A new culvert under a bridge allows water to flow freely rather than through narrow channels.
    Information icon Downstream view of the Gills Creek Drive road crossing after culvert replacement. Photo, Morgan Wolf, USFWS

    Against all odds: return of the Gills Creek ecosystem

    October 28, 2019 | 2 minute read

    If you had asked recovery biologists 10 years ago to list the best places to return mussels to the wild, Gills Creek would have been at the very bottom of that list. The small South Carolina stream had been through a lot. Too much, it seemed, to recover. Situated just south of Charlotte, North Carolina, and east of Lancaster, South Carolina, the watershed had seen the advance of suburban sprawl, and was battling ongoing agricultural degradation.  Learn more...

  • 2019 regional “Sense Of Wonder” award winner

    September 30, 2019 | 1 minute read

    It is with great pride we announce Patricia Midgett, visitor services manager at Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, located in South Carolina, as our 2019 Regional “Sense Of Wonder” Award recipient.  Learn more...

Bears-Bluff

  • A brown entrance sign that reads Bears Bluff National Fish Hatchery under a canopy of live oak and palm trees.
    Information icon Entrance to Bears Bluff National Fish Hatchery in South Carolina. Photo by USFWS.

    Bears Bluff National Fish Hatchery

    The Bears Bluff National Fish Hatchery serves as a part of the Warmwater Fisheries and Aquatic Conservation Program in the South Atlantic-Gulf Region of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The coastal location of the 31-acre facility along the banks of the North Edisto River in South Carolina provides an ideal site to investigate culture techniques for a wide variety of freshwater, saltwater and anadromous (fish that migrate from saltwater to fresh) aquatic species.  Learn more...

Charleston

  • A black, grey and yellow snake with a rounded head.
    Information icon Southern hognose snake. Photo by Pierson Hill, FWC.

    South Carolina Ecological Services Field Office

    Serving the entire state of South Carolina, our mission is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.  Learn more...

News

  • A small, beige minnow-like fish with a dark stripe down its side
    Information icon Ozark chub. Photo by Dustin Lynch, Arkansas Natural Heritage Comission.

    Improved science and conservation partnerships mean a Southeastern fish and flowering plant do not need Endangered Species Act protections

    December 18, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Based on an extensive review of the best available science, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that the Ozark chub and the purpledisk honeycombhead do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future. Protection of these species on conservation lands and new survey data helped inform the Service’s decisions not to list these species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). These not warranted findings are due in part to ESA-inspired partnerships between local, state and federal stakeholders, who collaborated to protect and conserve these species before they required federal protections.  Read the full story...

  • A small yellow breasted bird with grey feathers.
    Information icon Kirtland’s warblers nest exclusively in jack pine stands. Photo by Joel Trick, USFWS.

    Partners celebrate successful recovery of beloved songbird

    October 8, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Bird enthusiasts from around the world travel to northern Michigan in hopes of catching sight of a Kirtland’s warbler, a small songbird once poised on the brink of extinction. Now the species is thriving thanks to decades of effort by a diverse group of dedicated partners. Due to the species’ remarkable recovery, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced that it no longer warrants protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Read the full story...

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