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Tag: South Carolina Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “South Carolina Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    A unique mountain refuge protects endangered wetlands and the wildlife within

    August 24, 2017 | 8 minute read

    East Flat Rock, North Carolina – It’s not much to look at really. Nothing about this all-too-familiar stretch of Southern blacktop indicates that a rare, beautiful and endangered flower thrives just beyond the railroad tracks. There’s a convenience store, a small engine repair shop, a few modest homes. General Electric makes lights at a factory up the road. Bat Fork Creek meanders nearby. Below the tracks, though, in an Appalachian mountain bog, bunched arrowheads rise from soggy ground.  Learn more...

  • The beach at Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge goes dark mid afternoon during the solar eclipse.
    Information icon Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuges goes dark during the total solar eclipse. Photo by Kristen Peters, USFWS.

    Dark delight

    August 23, 2017 | 5 minute read

    Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, South Carolina – The solar eclipse of 2017 seemed to approach slowly. In truth, it came hurtling toward the eastern edge of America at more than 1,000 mph, a 70-mile-wide swath of temporary nightfall that stopped traffic and quickened hearts.  Learn more...

News

  • Three men meet before deloying with heavy equipment.
    Information icon USFWS employees at Mississippi Sandhill Crane finalize their equipment and supply checks before responding to Florida to support the Irma recovery response in Florida. Photo by USFWS.

    Service assesses damage, starts cleanup

    September 12, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Hurricane Irma, once a category 5 storm, has nearly played itself out. As of Tuesday, Sept. 12, the storm that howled up the west coast of Florida had dwindled to gusts and rain over North Carolina – a tempest, still, but nothing like the terror that came ashore two days earlier. Weather in Florida is returning to what is normal this time of year, said Kevin Scasny, a meteorologist with the U.  Read the full story...

  • Radar or Irma.
    Information icon Irma marches north. NOAA/NASA.

    Irma continues its assault on Southeast

    September 11, 2017 | 2 minute read

    Hurricane Irma pushed north from Florida early Monday morning leaving behind miles of downed trees and power lines with Georgia and Alabama next in her dangerous sites. Roughly 7 million Floridians remained without power, yet fears of widespread death and destruction proved, thankfully, unfounded. Virtually every U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employee, from Key West National Wildlife Refuge to Piedmont NWR, was safe and accounted for, according to mid-morning field reports.  Read the full story...

  • A swirling cloud mass south of Florida.
    Information icon Hurricane Irma from space. Satellite image by NOAA/NASA.

    Irma reaches Florida, heads north

    September 10, 2017 | 2 minute read

    Hurricane Irma sped up early Sunday morning before hitting the Florida Keys, returning to Category 4 status with top speeds of 130 mph. And, for the first time ever, Atlanta was placed under a tropical storm warning. Irma arrived just east of Key West about 9 a.m. Although shifting somewhat westerly, Irma now targets Fort Myers and Tampa where peak gusts could reach 160 mph. Hurricane Irma forecasted path.  Read the full story...

  • A massive spinning cloud mass between Cuba and the Bahamas.
    Information icon Hurricane Irma image from space. NOAA/NASA.

    Irma aims at Keys, Georgia, Alabama

    September 9, 2017 | 2 minute read

    Hurricane Irma is headed toward the Florida Keys and the south-central part of the state. Its winds are at 130 mph, but it’s expected to gain strength over the water. Irma should be a category 4 tempest, with winds at 150 mph, when it makes landfall around 8 a.m. Sunday. Hurricane Irma forecasted path. Map by Roy Hewitt, USFWS. Already, say meteorologists at the National Hurricane Center, south Florida is experiencing 30 mph wind gusts.  Read the full story...

  • A biologist looks out at the destruction and fallen vegetation outside the gate of the aviary.
    Information icon Looking out at Aviary gate towards the facility entrance. Photo by USFWS.

    Friday Hurricane Irma roundup

    September 8, 2017 | 1 minute read

    Damage assessment continues in Puerto Rico in the aftermath of Irma. All U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees are safe, but about 70 percent of the island was without power Friday morning, and ATMs were not working. Culebra National Wildlife Refuge reported minor damage to its greenhouse and shop office. Service meteorologist Kevin Scasny estimates Irma will make landfall in south Florida, around 6 a.m. Sunday as a Category 4 hurricane.  Read the full story...

  • Satellite image of huge hurricane between Florida and Puerto Rico.
    Information icon Hurricane Irma from space. Photo by NASA/NOAA GOES.

    Service prepares for Hurricane Irma

    September 8, 2017 | 2 minute read

    Releasing water. Moving trucks to higher ground. Closing up shop. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuges, fish hatcheries, and offices in Hurricane Irma’s projected path undertook a series of safety and preventive measures Friday in preparation for the killer storm. About 60 Service properties and 400 employees in Florida and Georgia sit within Irma’s hurricane and tropical storm cone. The Category 4 storm is expected to make landfall near Key Largo, Florida by 8 a.  Read the full story...

  • Two men attach a tarp onto a damaged roof.
    Information icon Steve Ricks and Jeff Van Vracken, an aquatic ecologist at the Panama City office, lay down a tarp on a National Key Deer Refuge home. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Tips for rebuilding

    September 8, 2017 | 2 minute read

    Some property owners facing the daunting task of rebuilding homes or businesses damaged by Hurricane Irma don’t have to worry about the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) slowing things down. People whose property also serves as habitat to endangered or threatened species can rebuild with minimal government delay, according to the Service. There is but one provision: You must rebuild on the same footprint of the original structure. If you want to rebuild on a larger footprint, you will need to call the Service for a conversation and a permit.  Read the full story...

  • A massive hurricane threatens Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.
    Hurricane Irma mid-day on September 6, 2017 off the east coast of Puerto Rico. Satellite Image by NOAA GOES-16.

    Hurricane Irma: How we are responding

    September 7, 2017 | 4 minute read

    Hurricane Irma, the second most powerful Atlantic basin hurricane in recorded history, has killed at least nine people in the Caribbean region, and is projected to be heading for Florida and the southeastern United States soon. “Our priority is the safety of our employees, making sure they are safe and then back to work as soon as personal priorities are taken care of,” said David Viker, acting deputy regional director of the Service’s Southeast Region, which is directly in Irma’s path.  Read the full story...

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